"Phased plasma rifle in the 40-watt range."


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CNYCacher
April 29, 2007, 02:29 AM
I have read that phrase I don't know how many times on this board and I always wondered where it came from.

Just found out as I was browsing THR and heard those words coming from my television, what a great scene! It definitely deserves its place as a gunny inside joke.

". . . Only what you see here, buddy!"

It's on Spike TV right now, BTW

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Roccobro
April 29, 2007, 03:24 AM
My TV was off. Where does it come from?

Justin

Vairochana
April 29, 2007, 03:27 AM
Terminator

DoubleTapDrew
April 29, 2007, 03:31 AM
Da UZI 9 millimeter. Da 45 long slide with da laser sight. Da 12 gauge autoloader...

You sure know your weapons pal

Kinda funny though, I think that movie was in cali and he bought a full auto or two from a regular pawn shop type dealer. I wonder how many times Diane Feinstein watched that scene before she sighed the assault weapons ban :barf:

Vairochana
April 29, 2007, 03:35 AM
So why does a robot from the future have an Austrian accent?-does it make him more efficient or just a worse painter?

PeteRR
April 29, 2007, 03:42 AM
Kinda funny though, I think that movie was in cali and he bought a full auto or two from a regular pawn shop type dealer.

I read an article interviewing Jim Cameron long ago about the movie. There was a scene that was cut from the movie showing the Terminator converting the Uzi and AR180 into full auto.

The Good
April 29, 2007, 03:55 AM
hey just what you see pal

fattsgalore
April 29, 2007, 05:02 AM
I've heard it in numerous cartoons. That and the term "I'll be your huckle berry."
I don't know what they mean or where they originated, but they make me laugh for sure.

HardRock
April 29, 2007, 05:08 AM
"I'll be your huckle berry" came from the Kurt Russel "Tombstone". Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday.

Henry

CC Bob
April 29, 2007, 08:45 AM
It's "I'm your huckleberry..." , by the way...:neener:

G36-UK
April 29, 2007, 09:43 AM
I was just watching that last night.


"Twelve gauge autoloader"

"That's Italian. You can go Pump or Auto."

"The .45 Longslide with Laser Sighting"

"These are brand new; we just got these in. That's a good gun: you just touch the trigger and a beam comes out, and you just put the red dot where you want the bullet to go. Anything else?"

"Phased-plasma pulse rifle in 40-watt range"

"*chuckles* Hey, just what you see, pal."

"The Uzi Nine Millimetre?"

"You know your weapons buddy. Any one of these is ideal for home defense. So, which'll it be?"

"All."

"I may close early today. There's a fifteen-day wait on the handguns, but the rifles you can take right now - you can't do that."

"Wrong"

*BLAM*



At least, that's as far as I can remember.

There was a scene that was cut from the movie showing the Terminator converting the Uzi and AR180 into full auto.

It was in the Randall Frakes novel. In the Shaun Hutson novel, he's got what Hutson called a "Heckler and Koch" MP-44, and a Remington shotgun.

Edit: Hang on, didn't one of the first drafts of the Cali AWB ban the Plasma Rifle and the M-41A?

TexasP226
April 29, 2007, 10:33 AM
Did you see how huge the laser on the .45 was??? Yikes! Thank goodness for lasermax! ;-)

kjeff50cal
April 29, 2007, 01:26 PM
"I'll be your huckle berry" came from the Kurt Russel "Tombstone". Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday.


"I'll be your huckle berry" is a phrase that is period correct for "Tombstone". It is a tip of the hat to Mark Twain's "Tom Sawyer" character Huck Finn. Huckleberry was Tom's pard in adventure.

Snowdiver
April 29, 2007, 01:42 PM
Quote:
"I'll be your huckle berry" came from the Kurt Russel "Tombstone". Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday.
"I'll be your huckle berry" is a phrase that is period correct for "Tombstone". It is a tip of the hat to Mark Twain's "Tom Sawyer" character Huck Finn. Huckleberry was Tom's pard in adventure.
And all this time I thought it was from Huckelberry Hound?

44AMP
April 29, 2007, 06:08 PM
More than 20 years ago (1984?). Laser sights for pistol at that time were science fiction. Laser sights for rifles at this time were about 2 feet long, 4 inches wide and about 6 inches deep. And they were the smallest that could be built with existing technology!

In an interview (when the movie was new), the director made a point of saying the gunshop(pawnshop) scene had deliberate factual errors, (the shotgun ammo on the counter making it simple for the terminator to load) in order to enhance the dramatic content of the scene.

There are a many great scenes in the movie, including the seldom shown penetration of firearms. In the police station, the Terminator shoots the detective through the wall. How often does this happen? Not very often. Common are the scenes of the heroes hiding behind things that are not even remotely bulletproof, and emerging completely unscathed!

Terminator is virtually non stop action. Other than the motel love scene, ( which I think is only there to allow the audience to catch their breath) the entire film drives along with the pace of the relentless killing machine from the future. As much as the special effects, it is the pace of the film that put it in a class by itself when it was released.

FYI, Schwartzenegger was originally considered for the "Kyle Reese" character, but after reading the script, insisted he be the Terminator! Even with the accent, I'd say that one worked pretty well.

Hawk
April 29, 2007, 07:06 PM
I kept wondering why I remembered the line as being from Aliens.

Leave it to Wikipedia to make me feel a little better about my memory:

In Aliens, another Cameron film, "phased plasma pulse rifle" is a weapon that the excitable Private William Hudson (Played by Bill Paxton), jokingly informs Ripley is part of the Marines arsenal (along with knives and sharp sticks). The scene takes place aboard the marine dropship and was omitted from the original version released to theaters. It can been seen in the films Special Edition which was first released in 1992 and then later in subsequent DVD box sets.

The first time I saw the movie was in the "special edition".

<whew>

rc135
April 29, 2007, 07:14 PM
I read a recent Ayoob article in one of the gun rags. It was about the OK Corral shootout and was VERY well written and informative. Anyway, he quotes what Doc Holiday really said, something about a daisy, don't remember exactly, but the original line by Doc isn't really translatable into modern English, so the writers used the huckleberry line instead. Read the Ayooob article if you can. I'll try to find out which magazine it's in and re-post later...

"Nostalgia isn't what it used to be." -- Peter DeVries

"Perhaps one should not think so much of oneself -- though it is an interesting subject." -- Norman Douglas

Callahan: Well, we're not just gonna let you walk out of here like that.
Hood: Who's ‘we,’ sucka?
Callahan: Smith, Wesson, and me. -- “Dirty Harry”

sansone
April 29, 2007, 07:18 PM
it was 40 kilowatt if I remember correctly. 40 watts would barely light a bulb

Notch
April 29, 2007, 07:50 PM
The scene where Doc says "I'll be your hukleberry" isnt at the ok shootout. It takes place in a stand of trees and only doc and the antagonist are present.....

Notch
April 29, 2007, 07:51 PM
I thought that doc said "I'll be your huckleberry" when he met some guy in a stand of trees... in the movie..

mrmeval
April 29, 2007, 08:02 PM
He said 40 watt.

Scroll down to the audio link
http://www.sciflicks.com/the_terminator/sounds.html

telomerase
April 29, 2007, 08:34 PM
40 watts would barely light a bulb

Tasers use less than 40 watts... so do the new laser-tasers that use conductive paths generated by UV lasers. 40 watts of gamma rays is pretty lethal. If you'd spend more time in the many alt universes where the US kept the 2nd Amendment in force, you'd be more familiar with weapon technologies invented after 1947 :D .

Anyway, how do you "phase" a plasma? It's just intended to indicate he's asking for something not invented yet.

MikePGS
April 29, 2007, 08:56 PM
I actually think i might rent that movie tonight, because terminator 2 was on yesterday. I haven't seen it in some time and i noticed that the 1911's (which were used extensively by Sarah Connor and The Terminator) not only had their hammers back, but also used seven shots. nice.

Gifted
April 29, 2007, 09:06 PM
I prefer this scenario.
http://www.cyantian.net/csafari/archive.php?day=20010527

auberg
April 29, 2007, 10:06 PM
Just don't forget, "You're a daisy if you do."

Great movie.

Kilmer was great in the part.

Lucky
April 29, 2007, 10:09 PM
Anyway, how do you "phase" a plasma? It's just intended to indicate he's asking for something not invented yet


Whether you use lasers or particle beams, you'll need a bit over a kilojoule of output energy to reliably incapacitate a human target. In the case of a laser weapon, that energy would be subdivided into ~1 joule pulses at ~5 microsecond intervals, to achieve penetration in the face of a laser's natural tendency to deposit energy at the target's surface. Particle beams don't have that problem; boost the electrons up to a few hundred MeV, and you can dump the whole kilojoule's worth at once.

The plasma clears away easily in that time frame; debris is the real issue, and the driving force between the 5 microsecond pulse rate. That allows roughly 90% of the debris to clear the beam path, assuming a 1mm beam and instantaneous 1J pulses. 1 joule every 5 microseconds is optimal against soft tissue, other materials will want different pulse trains.


It was recently revealed that the US military was researching a rather alarming line of less-lethal weapons, the Pulsed Energy Projectile (PEP) program.

(As a side note, understand that there is no such thing as a "non-lethal" weapon. This is because any weapon or gas that can reliably incapacitate or render unconscious a 300 pound world wrestling champion will be strong enough to instantly kill a small child or elderly person.)


PEP weapons fire a laser pulse that is very intense but only a fraction of a second in duration. The pulse vaporizes a tiny portion of the hapless victim's clothing or skin, creating a plasma burst intense enough to knock the victim to the ground. This was intended to be used for crowd control. I don't know about you but it seems to me that a pulse strong enough to knock one down is also strong enough to make one's eyeballs explode if it hit your face. But I digress.

However, during test performed on animals, the researchers noticed something unexpected. The pulses were creating pain and temporary paralysis in the test animals. As it turns out, certain pulses would create a plasma burst emitting an electromagnetic signal of proper frequency to artificially stimulate the nerve endings in the animal's skin.



The 'phase' part could be one of several things, #1 it could be like a phased-array of laser diodes Phase-locked diode laser arrays
Lots of microlasers on a chip, all working together. Extremely efficient, if you can actually get them to work together. #2 it could be that there is something changing frequency I also mentioned earlier that lasers would likely have to have pulse energy and frequency tuned to the specific material being targeted. It might be possible to do this automatically, based on crude spectoanalysis of the material vaporized in each pulse, but if not expect penetration to be roughly halved if a laser weapon is fired at a target it has not been optimized for.

Or perhaps something altogether different.

http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/rocket3l.html

asiparks
April 29, 2007, 10:23 PM
i noticed that the 1911's (which were used extensively by Sarah Connor and The Terminator) not only had their hammers back, but also used seven shots. nice
heh ! count the shots from the T1000's 1911 in the scene where our heroic trio run into the elevators to escape from the asylum...around 21 with no reload...but as it was insanely cool, it's safe to let it slide....

hotsauce
April 29, 2007, 10:38 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H47QlGq3zQ4

Here's the clip. Enjoy.

Kael
April 29, 2007, 10:47 PM
I thought that doc said "I'll be your huckleberry" when he met some guy in a stand of trees... in the movie..

it was when Doc fought Johnny Ringo, because he knew Earp couldn't beat him.
I've seen it a...few times. good flick. ;)

evan price
April 29, 2007, 11:10 PM
Billy Clanton: Why, it's the drunk piano player. You're so drunk, you can't hit nothin'. In fact, you're probably seeing double.
[Billy Clanton draws a knife]
Doc Holliday: [takes out a second gun] I have two guns, one for each of ya.


Val Kilmer played that part to perfection.

Although the Huckleberry line was said first, when Holliday was sitting on the porch in the barber's chair, and Johnny Ringo says, "Isn't anyone here man enough to play for blood?"
Holliday stands up and draws a pistol that he holds behind his back at the ready and says, "I'll be your huckleberry."

DoubleTapDrew
April 30, 2007, 01:08 AM
Only on THR do we dissect movie quotes about weapons that haven't been invented :p
Terminator 2 has been on a lot lately. The lever action shotgun is pretty cool. Not something you see every day.
Now...in the first scene of T2, ahnold goes into the bar and confronts a biker that matches his size and asks for his clothes, boots, and motorcycle. The guy is eventually thrown into the kitchen and lands on the grill burning his hands badly. He tries to rack the slide on his 1911 with his sleeve since his hand is so burnt and doesn't make it work. Yet another reason to carry cocked and locked (although against a terminator it doesn't matter what you have short of a phased plasma rifle :D )

Lucky
April 30, 2007, 01:33 AM
They eye's on the H.K. model are susceptible to damage:)

Kr4kJ4k
April 30, 2007, 05:58 AM
here's an interesting link to the origin of the phrase "I'll be your huckleberry"
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-huc1.htm

kjeff50cal
April 30, 2007, 09:39 AM
As huckleberries are small, dark and rather insignificant, in the early part of the nineteenth century the word became a synonym for something humble or minor, or a tiny amount. An example from 1832: “He was within a huckleberry of being smothered to death”. Later on it came to mean somebody inconsequential. Mark Twain borrowed some aspects of these ideas to name his famous character, Huckleberry Finn. His idea, as he told an interviewer in 1895, was to establish that he was a boy “of lower extraction or degree” than Tom Sawyer.

Also around the 1830s, we see the same idea of something small being elaborated and bombasted in the way so typical of the period to make the comparison a huckleberry to a persimmon, the persimmon being so much larger that it immediately establishes the image of something tiny against something substantial. There’s also a huckleberry over one’s persimmon, something just a little bit beyond one’s reach or abilities; an example is in David Crockett: His Life and Adventures by John S C Abbott, of 1874: “This was a hard business on me, for I could just barely write my own name. But to do this, and write the warrants too, was at least a huckleberry over my persimmon”.

Quite how I’m your huckleberry came out of all that with the sense of the man for the job isn’t obvious. It seems that the word came to be given as a mark of affection or comradeship to one’s partner or sidekick. There is often an identification of oneself as a willing helper or assistant about it, as here in True to Himself, by Edward Stratemeyer, dated 1900: “ ‘I will pay you for whatever you do for me.’ ‘Then I’m your huckleberry. Who are you and what do you want to know?’ ”. Despite the obvious associations, it doesn’t seem to derive directly from Mark Twain’s books.


I stand partially corrected:scrutiny: .

G36-UK
April 30, 2007, 10:32 AM
I kept wondering why I remembered the line as being from Aliens.
...

The first time I saw the movie was in the "special edition".


Me too. Want me to quote that part too?;)

it was 40 kilowatt if I remember correctly.

It was 40 watt, but in the S.M. Stirling novels, it was changed to 40 kilowatt, mainly because it seemed more realistic.

heh ! count the shots from the T1000's 1911 in the scene where our heroic trio run into the elevators to escape from the asylum...around 21 with no reload...but as it was insanely cool, it's safe to let it slide....

As far as I know, that's a Browning Hi-Power that he got off the unfortunate Lewis.

Yet another reason to carry cocked and locked (although against a terminator it doesn't matter what you have short of a phased plasma rifle)

Heh. Good point. I'm pretty sure a .50BMG would do okay against the 800 Series (Probably why the Governator banned them).

Red Tornado
April 30, 2007, 10:52 AM
Yet another source....with references yet!
http://home.earthlink.net/~knuthco1/Itemsofinterest1/huckleberrysource.htm



On and off I hear discussions in which people speculate on the exact origin and meaning is of the quaint idiom used by Doc Holliday in the movie "Tombstone." I've heard some wild suggestions, including "huckleberry" meaning "pall-bearer" suggesting "I'll bury you."

Still others think it has something to do with Mark Twain's character, Huckleberry Finn, and means "steadfast friend, pard." This is unlikely, since the book of that title was not written until 1883. Tom Sawyer was written in 1876, but nowhere there is the term "huckleberry" used to mean "steadfast friend" or the like.

Still others claim that a victor's crown or wreath of huckleberry is involved, making the statement "I'm your huckleberry" something like "I'll beat you!" But no such reference can be found in the historical materials supporting the use of this term in 19th century America. Additionally, "huckleberry" was native to North America so it's unlikely it was used in ancient Britain as a prize!

Solutions to such questions are actually very easy to find, since there are numerous dictionaries of the English language in its various periods, and there are dictionaries of English slang. These works simply cull from books, magazines, and newspapers of the period representative usages of the words to illustrate their meaning. I consulted several of these and found the expression to have a very interesting origin.

"Huckleberry" was commonly used in the 1800's in conjunction with "persimmon" as a small unit of measure. "I'm a huckleberry over your persimmon" meant "I'm just a bit better than you." As a result, "huckleberry" came to denote idiomatically two things. First, it denoted a small unit of measure, a "tad," as it were, and a person who was a huckleberry could be a small, unimportant person--usually expressed ironically in mock self-depreciation. The second and more common usage came to mean, in the words of the "Dictionary of American Slang: Second Supplemented Edition" (Crowell, 1975):

"A man; specif., the exact kind of man needed for a particular purpose. 1936: "Well, I'm your huckleberry, Mr. Haney." Tully, "Bruiser," 37. Since 1880, archaic.

The "Historical Dictionary of American Slang" which is a multivolume work, has about a third of a column of citations documenting this meaning all through the latter 19th century.

So "I'm your huckleberry" means "I'm just the man you're looking for!"

Now ain't that a daisy!

The "Daisy" comment is easier. In the late 19th century "daisy" was a common slang term for "the best in it's class." So for "daisy" just substitute "the best" and you'll have it. It was a short-lived idiom and doesn't seem to be popular much after 1890.



I've been hearing the huckle bearer stuff for a while, but I think this seems more likely...and more documented.
RT

Creeping Incrementalism
April 30, 2007, 11:27 AM
I too watched T2 this weekend on cable. And again a few weeks before that. And again a few months before that.

Regarding the first Terminator, in the scene where he shoots up the police station, what kind of rifle is he using?

I heard that Arnold's casting as the terminator was actually something forced on Cameron by the studio. One reason Cameron deliberately had few lines for the Terminator was because he wasn't sure of Arnold's acting ability--I've never heard anything about Arnold considering the Reese character. Originally, the terminator was supposed to be a normal-looking person, and the actor who played Bishop in aliens was used by Cameron as a terminator in some stunt he used to pitch the movie idea to the studio.

AJ Dual
April 30, 2007, 12:36 PM
The Plasma rifles as supplied to the Terminators by Skynet have two "barrels". While it creates the impression of being an OICW type weapon firing two different things, The skinny underbarrel is an ultraviolet laser that creates an electricaly conductive ionization path in the atmosphere that the plasma bolt from the upper barrel can follow to the target.

As compared to pen pointers which can begin to burn holes in paper and thin plastic at just 50 milliwats or so, 40 Watts of UV is pretty huge. And "40 Watt Range" which would initialy seem to confuse distance and power, (or just be a range of Wattage) could mean a 40 watt UV laser that reliably creates an ionization path out to a certain distance for the plasma shot to follow.

That's at least the lore that's grown up around the "Plasma Rifle" from the Terminator franchise, (admittedly after the fact, from the movie dialouge) and it does bear at least some semblance to real-world physics. There actualy is development of "wireless tazers" that use UV lasers to create conduction ionization paths for the disabling electric charge to strike the target, so perhaps firing something more deadly down that ionization path is not such a stretch.

rocinante
April 30, 2007, 01:14 PM
Yeah concerning Doc Holiday and the movies I always just yell at the screen when Doc Holiday in the 1957 Gunfight at O.K. Corral says he was from Philadelphia. Doc Holiday was from Newnan GEORGIA! Don't get your history from Hollywood folks.

You guys don't have a plasma rifle? For 19.99 I will sell you a easy DIY home kit. I also have a steal deal on an old bridge in Brooklynn New York.

Dravur
April 30, 2007, 01:16 PM
and who knows, maybe I don't. A huckleberry is also the name of a holster, kind of like an across the chest shoulder rig. A few CAS use them and I have heard them referred as such. Now, I have no idea why he would say "I'm your shoulder holster" but it is another definition.

Hehe

G36-UK
April 30, 2007, 02:37 PM
I too watched T2 this weekend on cable. And again a few weeks before that. And again a few months before that.


I watched it two days ago for the first time in about a year. Sister's ex forgot to return it.

Regarding the first Terminator, in the scene where he shoots up the police station, what kind of rifle is he using?


It's an Armalite AR-180 (http://world.guns.ru/assault/as36-e.htm), with (IIRC) the stock removed.

I heard that Arnold's casting as the terminator was actually something forced on Cameron by the studio. One reason Cameron deliberately had few lines for the Terminator was because he wasn't sure of Arnold's acting ability--I've never heard anything about Arnold considering the Reese character.

Yep, the Behind the Scenes featurettes on the DVD gives you the story. Arnold was considered for Reese initially, but wanted to be Terminator, so the studio kind of put pressure on Cameron.

He was supposed to meet with Arnold for lunch, and got the idea to start a fight with him to "dissuade" him (he actually said to his friend "I'm going to pick a fight with Arnold, if it goes wrong, the TV and the stereo are yours").

He ended up liking Arnold, and agreed to give him the part.

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