The most interesting Range trip yet


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kd7nqb
April 30, 2007, 03:53 AM
So, on Friday a buddy of mine and I ventured to our favorite gun store and he got a new Kel-Tec P3AT. So of course this morning we had to go put some rounds through it. His GF is also looking for a new gun since she is now applying for her CHL and we figured we should take her along. Well this turned out to be one of the best trips ever with some noted draw backs. It also prompted questions.

1. When we first arrived there were two guys who had .454C carbine out and they were letting it rip for what seemed like forever. Reminder this is an indoor 25yd range so even one gun of that magnitude effects everyone. It actually made it so the new shooter we had with us couldn't get good instruction from either of us because she could not concentrate.

2. I wandered down to where the guys with the .454C were and tried to explain to them the new situation and asked if they could just go grab a soda or something (or shoot a different gun) for like 5min so we could get her all set up and then the could go back to whatever they were accomplishing they rejected the idea, not in a rude or obnoxious way but certainly were going to do us any favors either.
Do you guys ever encounter these situations? How do you handle them

3. The new P3AT shot like a charm, we held off on having my buddies GF shoot it until she had shot the Mark II a bunch so she could get down pistol basics before adding the challenge of a tiny pocket pistol. The recoil off that thing was much different than I expected. My father has an Astra A-60 in .380 so I expected the Kel-Tec to be comparable and frankly it was not that kel-tec shot great but had much more recoil and took some getting use to.

4. Everybody at the range (including people we didnt know) seemed very interested in us. Some because we had the cool little microgun and others because we had the cute 90lb girl shooting. This actually did encourage her at first but she quickly got tired of 6-8 old white men telling her all the things she was doing wrong.

5. At the point where we had been at the range about an hour a family of 5 showed up in the 2 lanes next to us and they had a pretty good selection of firearms one of which was a .45acp glock (not a glock guy so I could not ID the model) and I made them the deal to let them all shoot the .380 for a few rounds if they would give us a little bit of .45free time so we could show his GF the specific differences of the pocket pistol. They very much agree and the mother who was also of small statue was very helpful in showing her some of the tricks that let small framed women shoot easier.

6. When we left in all the congratulations and focus on our new shooter we left one of the .22lr rifles at the range, we noticed it later and picked it up on my way to work. I had never done that and felt like a moron but I guess we just got excited about adding one more small framed woman to the shooters club.

7. FINALLY AND BEST OF ALL. As we were about ready to pack up the girl we had taken with us said, wait cant we shoot one more box and went and got another box of .380 and ripped through it like a champ. It was really satisfying to see that moment. She also moved her CCW class from next week to NEXT SATURDAY. Because she was really excited about the whole idea of being responsible for her own safety.

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swingset
April 30, 2007, 04:17 AM
2. I wandered down to where the guys with the .454C were and tried to explain to them the new situation and asked if they could just go grab a soda or something (or shoot a different gun) for like 5min so we could get her all set up and then the could go back to whatever they were accomplishing they rejected the idea, not in a rude or obnoxious way but certainly were going to do us any favors either.
Do you guys ever encounter these situations? How do you handle them

While I certainly would have been cool with holding off if you had asked me in that situation (I feel initiating new shooters is one of the best things you can do on a gun range), others might not feel you're entitled to quiet time on the range - they paid for the use of it just like you did.

These issues are a large part of why I shed buying fancy cars & full autos and instead bought 44 acres and a shooting range of my own. I like being able to instruct new people, or be free of them, if you know what I mean. Public ranges suck, because they involve the public.

kd7nqb
April 30, 2007, 04:38 AM
I 100% agree that the had no obligation to take it easy. Just seems to me that a little good will goes along way.

vis--vis
April 30, 2007, 05:02 AM
The range I go to allows rifles and shotguns only during the week when the amount of shooters is low so as to prevent this. I stood in the next lane while my roommate was shooting my AR. I remember thinking how much it would suck if I had to try shooting with that going on right next to me.

Alexfubar
April 30, 2007, 06:29 AM
Never seen a prob like that before. I shoot at a club though , so we all know each other and actually try to get along.

Now & then I'll trade places with a black powder guy so he doesn't have to be showered with the brass from my AR or AK.

But he won't ask me to stop doing my thing ( mostly offhand standing with an EBR , while he is a precision bulleye shooter ). And I don't ask him to put away his notebook,spotting scope, and trays of carefully made handloads.

jeepmor
April 30, 2007, 06:39 AM
I'm in Portland area also. You might try out the impromptu outdoor range at Brown's Camp area off hwy 6 towards Tillamook. Can be very busy to very quiet, however, my experience is that people have always been happy to chill for a few while other instruct folks, setup targets and what have you.

Another CCW'r in Oregon, awesome.

Glockman17366
April 30, 2007, 07:01 AM
Were those guys with the carbine paying for the range time, or was the range crowded enough that they would have lost their lane if they took a break?

skud_dusty
April 30, 2007, 10:59 AM
I'm in Portland as well...there's a sweet little outdoor range just across the river from Cascade Locks that we found. It's really not that busy most of the time. Just yesterday me and a female friend went out there to try my new Taurus and introduce her to shooting. We were the only ones there for a couple hours before more finally showed up...It was beautiful out I don't see why there weren't more people there.

kd7nqb
April 30, 2007, 02:21 PM
Glockman, The way my range works is there is no time limit once you rent a lane. Its not uncommon to leave your guns and ammo on the table and grab a soda or snack. But again I want to say that they had NO obligation to change their ways for me, it was only a favor so I dont really want to complain about that.

RPCVYemen
April 30, 2007, 02:40 PM
I wandered down to where the guys with the .454C were and tried to explain to them the new situation and asked if they could just go grab a soda or something (or shoot a different gun) for like 5min so we could get her all set up and then the could go back to whatever they were accomplishing they rejected the idea, not in a rude or obnoxious way but certainly were going to do us any favors either.

Asking another shooter for a 5 minute lull does not strike me as a reasonable request. If you had asked me to stop shooting and go grab a soda, I would likely have declined your request.

I am happy to have the range go "cold" when when new shooter shows up on the line so they can set targets, etc. I am happy to put a brass catcher/net between my lane and yours if I am shooting an auto and flinging brass across your field of vision, etc. If you express interest in a weapon I am shooting, I will generally be happy to let your run a few rounds through it. (In fact, that happens fairly often - I shoot an SA revolver, and while it's not an unusual weapon. Usually I am surrounded by autoloaders. A lot of those folk are curious.) I think I am pretty flexible.

But your request that I not shoot for a couple of minutes so you can train/talk to someone seems pretty out of line to me.

If you want that level of control you need a personal range, or wait until the range is empty. Actually, swingset has the best solution:

These issues are a large part of why I shed buying fancy cars & full autos and instead bought 44 acres and a shooting range of my own.

So I would not be rude, but I would decline.

I took my niece shooting yesterday. The range I was on was a 50 yard multi/purpose (pistol rifle), and it was very crowded (the only time that I have seen every lane occupied). There were folks shooting rifles, a blackpowder muzzle loader, and a bunch of 45s. I would never have asked any of them to stop shooting so that I could get my niece "all set up." It was her first time shooting, and she loved it.

Just my opinon.

Mike

buck00
April 30, 2007, 02:49 PM
I made them the deal to let them all shoot the .380 for a few rounds if they would give us a little bit of .45free time


At a private range I would be much more willing to share a firearm with another shooter. At a public indoor range, I'm not so sure- some places you get all kinds of yahoos showing up randomly with various levels of gun experience and maturity.

But that is cool it worked out here.

Headless
April 30, 2007, 03:32 PM
I always show new shooters the basics of how the firearms function at their house before we even go to the range.
Take out .22 bolt action rifle. Explain 4 rules. Explain muzzle control. Explain muzzle control some more. Explain how to make sure a gun is safe and unloaded (action OPEN). Show what that means in a bolt action gun. Explain more muzzle control.
Take out .38 revolver. Explain differences between revolver and semiauto rifle. Explain differences between pistol and rifle (MUZZLE CONTROL). Show how to make sure the revolver is safe and unloaded (action OPEN).
Pull out semiauto pistol. Explain how semiauto differs from revolver. Show how semiauto feeds ammo, how you can check chamber, how you need to have mag ejected before you can eject your 'last' round. Show how to lock action open and verify the gun is safe.
Explain sight picture, show them the basics of grip on each gun.
Then go to the range and try and get the rest across through yelling. I think about the worst case scenario for a brand new shooter is walking up to the firing line and THEN attempting to learn all of the above. Much nicer to be able to chat about it in your own time, calmly, without the noise/distraction...

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