Does the term "packing heat" bug you as much as it does me?


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Joe Link
May 1, 2007, 01:53 AM
I really can't stand it. It seems so derogatory; I don't think I've ever heard it used in a positive way. As odd as it sounds, I think out of all the words and terms I've ever used, this one gets under my skin the most.

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thedpp
May 1, 2007, 01:55 AM
It bugs me a little, its a term a lot of criminals use to describe that they are carrying a gun.

Nitrogen
May 1, 2007, 01:58 AM
"gun free zone" and "collective right" bug me a lot more :D

Nomad, 2nd
May 1, 2007, 02:18 AM
No.

Justin
May 1, 2007, 02:21 AM
Does the term "packing heat" bug you as much as it does me?

No.

ArchAngelCD
May 1, 2007, 02:24 AM
Nope

Logan5
May 1, 2007, 02:59 AM
It's telling, in a way. People put on masks to blend into their sociopolitical environment, and try to maintain them, but then they slip.

It always seems to come up in conversation with my New York friends at parties, and it goes like this...
Beginning of party: Blah blah blah, I support gun control, blah blah...

+2 beers: Blah blah, you "packin' heat all the time?" blah blah "Wolverines!" blah blah "Zombies" blah...

+3 beers: Can we come up and go shoot handguns next weekend?

+4 beers: When I move out of NYC, I'm buying a gun, and I don't care what my wife says. Will you give me a discount on the NRA safety course, teach me everything you know, find me a good deal, and hold my hand?

No one really thinks that they should be the ones prohibited from doing something that might be cool, like going target shooting with a friend on the weekend, and they constantly bag on the scary looking guns, but when it comes right down to it they're fascinated with them. No one ever wants to drive up from NYC to shoot my Savage 99 in .300 Savage, or my 1886 Winchester.

When I think "Packing Heat" I'm thinking about an airweight bodyguard in my jacket pocket when I run out to the convenience store, and they're thinking about the Desert Eagle in the safe.

Monkeyleg
May 1, 2007, 03:06 AM
Yes, it bugs me. It's the phrase that the anti-gun media uses whenever a shall-issue concealed carry bill is up for debate.

It's an emotionally-loaded term. It implies some sort of reckless conduct on the part of those who go through the process of training, background checks, and licensing to carry a weapon.

I'm sure that many people here could come up with a similar phrase that describes the ethnicity or country of origin of those who commit the vast majority of violent crimes in the US.

But that wouldn't be PC, would it?

Plink
May 1, 2007, 03:14 AM
It does bother me, but only because I'm a guy with a lot of pet peeves. I dispise most all of the "hippisms" and "trendisms" that people toss around trying to be oh so hip and trendy, look cool, and fit in.

I'll give credit where credit is do. At least that term has survived a long time. Unlike stupid things like the "knuckle knock" or terms like "phat".

Hk996
May 1, 2007, 03:27 AM
not as much as the media using the term "clips" instead of magazines.....

Joe Link
May 1, 2007, 03:54 AM
Haha ask my girlfriend how many times I complain about that ^

Davo
May 1, 2007, 03:55 AM
Logan I know those types too. Seems alot of us have the signifigant other "feeling" things out for us.

Skibane
May 1, 2007, 04:13 AM
It's one of a handful of sarcastic cliches that is often used to subtly reinforce the stereotype of gun ownership as a throwback to earlier, more violent times (i.e., the wild west, or the gangster era). Other examples:

Gun-toting
pistol-packing
Strapping on a gun (or heat/a piece/a rod/a hog-leg, etc.)
Plugging (or ventilating) someone
Blasting (or blazing) away
Getting the drop (on someone)
(virtually any reference to) The OK Corral or High Noon

ETA: Logan5, if nothing else, your description of New Yorkers confirms my own conviction that they are pushovers when it comes to tolerating alcohol! :D

Jacka L Ope
May 1, 2007, 05:05 AM
Is that a submarine in your pants or are you packing heat? :neener:

jeepmor
May 1, 2007, 05:06 AM
Is that a submarine in your pants or are you packing heat?

Then I tell my wife....both. ;)


Let it go man, it's the low blood sugar talking, not you.

BTW, no bother here.

Cosmoline
May 1, 2007, 05:47 AM
I've used it before. I don't see the problem.

gun ownership as a throwback to earlier, more violent times

What's wrong with that? I pack iron, stow a hog leg, and burn down rogue ptarmigan. This *IS* the frontier.

coulta
May 1, 2007, 05:52 AM
With terms like "assault rifle" in popular usage, this phrase seems pretty benign.

Robert Hairless
May 1, 2007, 05:52 AM
How could it bother me when I'm wearing my trench coat and slouch hat, have my piece in my waistband, and am going off to solve a caper down those mean streets with my frail? That gat is what keeps the gunsels from drilling citizens with their Chicago typewriters.

"Is you packin' heat?" she asks while flashing her gams. Her hair flows over her shoulder like melted butter and the look in her eyes is wicked.

"Do your eyes hurt you?" I ask right back at her. And before she can answer I say, "Well they're killing me."

"Oh, big boy," she says right back to me. "Hubba hubba."

In the summertime, though, we call it packing cool.

:)

1911Tuner
May 1, 2007, 07:37 AM
Nah. I don't sweat the little things. It just don't mean nothin'...

FCFC
May 1, 2007, 07:59 AM
I was just thinking the other day that I really disliked the term "packing heat." (Almost as much as I dislike "packin' heat.")

I think it is too too casually hip and I associate it with the old late 1950s gangster movies (Raft, Cagney, etc.). I never use it. It's kind of caricature-ish to me.

OTOH, some very responsible, conservative and unhip gun guys use the term.

.cheese.
May 1, 2007, 08:19 AM
It only bugs me when my brother (an anti) blurts it out in public.

"Are you packin' heat?"..... and all I can think of is, "Well, technically it was called CCW'ing until you just blurted it out!.... now, yes I suppose I am!"

it bugs me from him.... I wish he realized the potential that can come from blurting that stuff out. It seems no matter how often I explain it to him, he doesn't get it and just says I'm overreacting.

But anyways.... that's the only time the answer is yes. Otherwise I couldn't care less.

BigG
May 1, 2007, 08:31 AM
No.

tinygnat219
May 1, 2007, 08:33 AM
I HATE cliches in any size shape and form.

eng23ine
May 1, 2007, 08:58 AM
Would you rather be "strapped"? Homie.:scrutiny:

bakert
May 1, 2007, 09:12 AM
The term "packing heat or iron" does irk me. Usually read in books, heard in movies, used by the media to sort of downgrade gun or gun owners in a subtle way, or by people trying to sound more knowledgable about guns that they really are. I carry a gun or a concealed weapon, no "heat" or "iron". Maybe I'm just getting to be a contrary old fart:p

Clipper
May 1, 2007, 09:26 AM
What elshe would you call carryin' a Roscoe, schweetheart?

Deanimator
May 1, 2007, 09:31 AM
It doesn't bother me at all. What bothers me:

1. The term "tooled", which means the same thing. It's typically used by effete Brits who think that everybody has a duty to be a victim of any violent criminal who takes an unhealthy interest in them. Without exception, EVERY person I've ever seen use the term "tooled" WAS a tool.

2. The term "shotty", referring to a shotgun. It's typically used by the same crowd who use the term "tooled" and who refer to soccer as "footy". I suspect that if George Michael had a shotgun, he'd refer to it as a "shotty".

Troutman
May 1, 2007, 10:53 AM
<<"gun free zone" and "collective right" bug me a lot more>>

As it should.


Terms like: Chopper….
Heater…
Rod…
Gat….
Should be less.


A lot better than slang from the anti-gun crowd.

Btw. Gun slang dates back to the 30’s, 40’s. …i.e. Old movies.

tydephan
May 1, 2007, 11:08 AM
Yes it bothers me...but that's life.

My dad (a retired Alabama State Trooper) doesn't like the term "Cops." He thinks it's derogatory.

My wife (a school teacher) cringes every time someone says "out loud" (technically, the correct usage is "aloud").

We all have our little...things. :p

Outlaw Man
May 1, 2007, 11:12 AM
I prefer "goin' heeled." :D

Megistopoda
May 1, 2007, 11:46 AM
Yes, that language bugs me too. It implies criminal intent and behavior.

I prefer "lawfully armed."

Cosmoline
May 1, 2007, 02:03 PM
It implies some sort of reckless conduct on the part of those who go through the process of training, background checks, and licensing to carry a weapon.

License? We don't need no stinking license!

beaucoup ammo
May 1, 2007, 02:18 PM
It takes a lot to really bug me. "Packing heat" isn't on my "bug" radar. The people who don't want me "packing heat" do bug me.

Lashlarue
May 1, 2007, 02:19 PM
Not near as much as "Is that a gun in your pocket or are you just happy to see me!"

BigG
May 1, 2007, 02:25 PM
How bout "skin that smokewagon and see what happens." :)

tradja
May 1, 2007, 02:29 PM
This phrase has always seemed flip to me. It refers to a practice that I regard with extreme gravity. I suppose I simply consider my "state of CCW" to be "armed" or simply prepared and equipped to defend myself and others.

As a "gun-lovin' hippie" (as one of my moderate friends calls me), I am somewhat uncomfortable (or usually just :rolleyes: ) with a lot of "John Wayne" gun culture. I have several liberal shooting buddies, I would like to shoot more with conservatives.

Gordon Fink
May 1, 2007, 02:47 PM
Yes, especially when used in an otherwise serious context. It’s like fingernails on a chalkboard.

And don’t get me started about “information literacy.” :mad:

~G. Fink

romma
May 1, 2007, 02:57 PM
Packing heat!! It is a throw back term... " Alright Jinksy, We're gonna sweat a confession outa you, so,,, Come Cocoa"!..

JCF
May 1, 2007, 03:25 PM
Yes.

Legionnaire
May 1, 2007, 03:34 PM
Although it sounds affected to me, it doesn't really bother me ... unless I'm the target of the question. If asked, my preference is to play stupid.

"Are you packin' heat?"
"I'm sorry, what do you mean?"
"Uh ... do you have a gun with you?"
"Do you really expect me to answer that?"

... etc.

Waitone
May 1, 2007, 04:39 PM
I think it a perfectly good term and I use it frequently. I do not like to surrender the language to the opposition. I prefer to infuse my own definition into a term. Why do we feel compelled to flee the battlefield every time we run into opposition.

Plink
May 1, 2007, 04:55 PM
How bout "skin that smokewagon and see what happens."

I've seen that term all over the net, in about a dozen variations. I know it's from a movie, but I can't for the life of me figure out what it means. I guess I had to see the movie to get it, eh?

Gordon Fink
May 1, 2007, 04:59 PM
I think it a perfectly good term.…

Sure, when you’ve reholstered after emptying a magazine or two. :neener:

~G. Fink

Nekron
May 1, 2007, 05:16 PM
Yes, it bugs me. It's the phrase that the anti-gun media uses whenever a shall-issue concealed carry bill is up for debate.

It's an emotionally-loaded term. It implies some sort of reckless conduct on the part of those who go through the process of training, background checks, and licensing to carry a weapon.

I'm sure that many people here could come up with a similar phrase that describes the ethnicity or country of origin of those who commit the vast majority of violent crimes in the US.

But that wouldn't be PC, would it?


All I would need to say about it, Monkeyleg just said. Thanks ML.

MrDig
May 1, 2007, 07:04 PM
On one of the Local News Programs our most Senior Anchor used the term "Packin Heat" in reference to our CCW Reform. Fortunatly for those of us that want to the Initiative passed. Our Efite Elitist Knows what best for us all News Anchor still has his hackles up over this and I just laugh at his stupidity. I objected to the manner in which he used it, the phrase itself. I use it myself on occasion if some one needs me to be more clear regarding a euphamism for CCW.

Deer Hunter
May 1, 2007, 07:17 PM
I told my Mother that I was going to carry a concealed weapon, and she made the comment. "Why would you need that? To cap people?"

tubeshooter
May 1, 2007, 07:34 PM
No.


The phrase may sometimes be a bit overly light for the gravity and responsibility of it, but overall..... no.

Cosmoline
May 1, 2007, 07:44 PM
I am somewhat uncomfortable (or usually just) with a lot of "John Wayne" gun culture

I'm more uncomfortable with the anti-gun culture.

Pitt762x54r
May 1, 2007, 07:48 PM
My wife calls it "Strapping on heat"

and I am offended at the idea of strapping anything on.


If it is said in a joking tone then it's fine. If someone seriously asks me I just stare blankly at them for a while.

Lonestar49
May 1, 2007, 07:55 PM
Quote: It bugs me a little, it's a term a lot of criminals use to describe that they are carrying a gun.
-------------------
...

With that in mind, let us move forward in our advancing Political Correctness ruled society,:scrutiny: and ban that term.


LS :neener:

WC145
May 1, 2007, 08:12 PM
Alot of these responses seem a little sensitive to me. If I'm in serious company, as in just been pulled over or going somewhere off-duty and have to ID myself, I'm armed. Any other time, particularly if I'm among friends, family, or colleagues I'll usually use similar terms to "packing heat" to describe my "state of ccw". I've never thought of carrying a gun as something that needs to be so seriously described, so, for me, concealed carry slang works just fine. I'd certainly use packin', carrying, strapped, wearing, going heavy, or any number of other cliches before I ever called it CCW'ing. If I ever heard that in conversation I'd probably laugh out loud.
IMO, in this case, as with most things in life, it's probably better not to take ourselves too seriously.

Clipper
May 1, 2007, 08:37 PM
Ya got that right, WC145...

Bazooka Joe71
May 1, 2007, 08:46 PM
no.


but the term is F'n stupid.

03Shadowbob
May 1, 2007, 09:22 PM
nope.

Skibane
May 1, 2007, 09:34 PM
Quote:
gun ownership as a throwback to earlier, more violent times
What's wrong with that? I pack iron, stow a hog leg, and burn down rogue ptarmigan. This *IS* the frontier.

The implication is that modern society is more "advanced", and has "evolved" beyond the need for guns. Thus, gun ownership is regarded as an anachronism, and anyone who embraces it is viewed as living in the past.

Lonestar49
May 1, 2007, 10:36 PM
Quote: The implication is that modern society is more "advanced", and has "evolved" beyond the need for guns. Thus, gun ownership is regarded as an anachronism, and anyone who embraces it is viewed as living in the past.
...

Exactly, and is the exact reason, when anyone hugs me, then gets those big eyes, and kinda looks down, I answer immediately:

Yep, I'm glad to see ya.


LS :)

eng23ine
May 1, 2007, 11:46 PM
Quote:
How bout "skin that smokewagon and see what happens."
I've seen that term all over the net, in about a dozen variations. I know it's from a movie, but I can't for the life of me figure out what it means. I guess I had to see the movie to get it, eh?
__________________

From Tombstone, which is on my all time top 10 movie list.

basically, Wyatt Earp is calling Johnny Tyler out.

"throwdown boy!" *smack*

"You gonna do somethin....or just stand there and bleed?"

The Canuck
May 2, 2007, 12:31 AM
Not as much as, "Why don't you just call the Police"?

Or, "Nobody needs guns in civilized society".

How about, "Why do you need a gun? Are you going to off somebody"?

Calling it "packing heat" would be great up here. I would call it "wearing" or "carrying", but if somebody called it "packing heat" I would have no truck with it.

JWarren
May 2, 2007, 12:34 AM
I don't care for the term, and it is not something you are likely to ever hear me say.

But if you want to say it, more power to you. I'll just cringe inwardly. :)


-- John

Biker
May 2, 2007, 12:40 AM
I don't let much bug me these days and I'm happier this way. As far as "packin' heat" goes, it depends on who is saying it. A 'sidewalk kommando'? Maybe just a tiny bit.
A Veteran of various kinds (military, cop or street)? You've earned the right.
In any case, it's really none o' my bidness.

Biker

230RN
May 2, 2007, 01:43 AM
Monkeyleg

It's an emotionally-loaded term. It implies some sort of reckless conduct on the part of those who go through the process of training, background checks, and licensing to carry a weapon.

That's why I like it, and use it in reference to myself, usually in a flip way. Somebody mentioned "surrendering" the term to the antis, ands someone else mentioned fleeing from these issues. I regard its usage in the same way that some ethnic and other groups can use self-referenced pejoriative terms amongst themselves.

And I can get away with it since I'm a very responsible, conservative and unhip gun guy.

Hk996

not as much as the media using the term "clips" instead of magazines.....

Good thing you weren't at the Tanner Gun Show in Denver last weekend. Some exhibitor had a big sign saying "CLIPS" over his table. Probably a function of signage space, though. MAGAZINES is a bigger word.

For myself, I don't care -- outside of technical treatises, if the meaning is clear from context, me knickers don't get wadded up over it. What does still bother me a little is homonym reversal, like muzzle break instead of muzzle brake. Don't know why. Saw that at the gun show, too. Me knickers got all wadded up and pinchy.

FCFC

OTOH, some very responsible, conservative and unhip gun guys use the term.

There. See? I told ya so.

tinygnat219

I HATE cliches in any size shape and form.

I agree. I avoid them like the plague.

What elshe would you call carryin' a Roscoe, schweetheart?

Great Bogey characterization, Clipper.

mnrivrat
May 2, 2007, 01:45 AM
Doesn't raise any eyebrows here.

Not a big deal, but I admitt I don't use that terminoligy as it sorta sounds Hollywood tacky to me.

Monkeyleg
May 2, 2007, 02:11 AM
"And I can get away with it since I'm a very responsible, conservative and unhip gun guy."

You may view yourself that way, your family and friends may view you that way, but I can guarantee that the media does not view you that way.

"Packing heat" is a perjorative term used by the anti's and the media to discredit any efforts to establish shall-issue CCW laws, or improve upon existing laws.

When the term "assault weapon" arrived on the scene back in the late 1980's, many of us tried to correct the media's use of the term, but to no avail.

Today, the term "assault weapon" is used to describe anything more than a BB gun.

Those who control the language control the debate.

Limeyfellow
May 2, 2007, 02:50 AM
Not as much as when my dog is in heat, but yes its an annoying phrase.

Im283
May 2, 2007, 03:03 AM
+1 to hating cliches.

Other than that I am packing heat, stowing a rod, carrying a piece, wearing an iron, protecting my family, and strapped, the list goes on and on.

Does it bother me, NO. It is what I am doing at the moment. Mostly I am exercising my 2nd ammendment right to keep and bear arms.

PS: Who cares if someone says clip or magazine? Stop splitting hairs! Either term lets people know what you are saying, same difference as motor or engine. Everyone knows it is a powerplant;)

dzimmerm
May 2, 2007, 03:35 AM
No, it does not bother me.

My personal feelings on CCW, which I have, is that if someone asks me if I am carrying the answer is always no. Otherwise it is not concealed. It is not a question of honesty. It is a question of implied brandishing, which is illegal in almost all situations.

dzimmerm

P.S. One exeception to my rule, if a member of the constablitory asks, I am required by law to answer truthfully.

230RN
May 2, 2007, 05:00 AM
Monkeyleg:

"Packing heat" is a perjorative term used by the anti's and the media to discredit any efforts to establish shall-issue CCW laws, or improve upon existing laws.

When the term "assault weapon" arrived on the scene back in the late 1980's, many of us tried to correct the media's use of the term, but to no avail.

I still like to use it. Repetition diminishes and trivializes the impact of the term. And we weren't smart enough to realize how bad the anti-gun sentiment was back then (eg, the soon-to-be GCA 68, to which you're referring , I'm sure.)

For all his immanent evil, Joseph Goebbels was a pretty smart cookie when it came to Public Relations. "Tell a lie often enough..."

And I am told that the Propaganda Machine was very effective in demeaning and diminishing the Poles with Polish jokes before September of 1939*. Also, with some other significant ethnic groups.

So nowadays some of our own minorites and protected class citizens have realized that "taking back the pejorative terms" is an effective means of countering this kind of propaganda.

So I like it. I pack a rod.

----------
* Subject to verification. I was told this a long time ago from a presumably reputable source, a Holocaust survivor, but I have not seen historical references to it, however. Yes, he still had his blurred number tatooed on his arm.

Soybomb
May 2, 2007, 05:48 AM
It doesn't bug me, it just sounds cheesy.

Hey Tony, you packing heat? If you got your iron we're going to rub a guy out sees. That wise guy stool pigeon will be called in and we'll wack 'em. Then we'll take the swag to the fence and lay low watching for the fuzz. No one muscles in on our territory. What vig does that shylock charge anyway?

It just sounds to me like something people that don't carry say. Its the same feeling you get when you hear some people talk about drugs and throw in the cool lingo.

BigG
May 2, 2007, 12:06 PM
"skin that smokewagon and see what happens."

That's from Tombstone (http://www.epinions.com/mvie-review-3381-683AF93-395A1DEB-prod1)

arkangel06
May 2, 2007, 12:50 PM
its pritty dameaning but i think its used more by the ''punks'' or ''gangsters'' then everyday people

arkangel06
May 2, 2007, 12:52 PM
it also really bugs me when they call guns ''heaters'' now i think thats an extremly stupied phrase

MrPeter
May 2, 2007, 01:19 PM
Good thing you weren't at the Tanner Gun Show in Denver last weekend. Some exhibitor had a big sign saying "CLIPS" over his table. Probably a function of signage space, though. MAGAZINES is a bigger word.
Yes, but "MAGS" is even shorter than "CLIPS" :)

Personally, I don't use the term, and cringe when my friends use it to describe me. This is probably because to me anyway, it is used in a derrogatory sense.
Recently my roommates and I were looking at a house for rent, and when I was getting dressed, as usual, I put my XD .45 in my IWB holster, and in my pants. He asked, "You're not taking that to the walkthrough, are you?" I answered the obvious, "Of course I am. I take it everywhere I go, you know that."
Now in other situations he might have used the term "armed" like I do to describe me, but in this case, he said in an attacking tone, "You're not seriously going to be packing heat (emphasis) when we're looking to rent someone's home?! Leave that here man!"
The discussion we had after that was besides the point. The fact is that using the term "packing heat" or "packing" or "strapped" or the like, unless used in a joking manner to parody thugs and lowlifes is insulting to me. I will make clear to anyone who uses that term unintentionally that I prefer "armed" or the everpleasing term: "prepared".

Let it also be known though that although it may qualify me as a "prude", I also don't allow anyone, even when making a joke, to call me their N-word or Wigger. G and Thugg are acceptable though :)

2cents.

romma
May 2, 2007, 01:56 PM
I prefer "carrying"... Or even "armed"...

kd7nqb
May 2, 2007, 02:03 PM
some of my "less informed" friends use terms like packing heat and it generally bugs me but not too much. My favorite way to suggest discreatly if somebody is carrying is to simply say "Are you naked?" but thats a long running inside quote in my circle of friends.

RandyC
May 2, 2007, 02:46 PM
It doesn't bug me. But then not alot does.

Stevie-Ray
May 2, 2007, 08:29 PM
Doesn't bother me a whit. I don't use it, but I don't care who does.

old4x4
May 2, 2007, 09:02 PM
Nope, not at all...

Leedavisone
May 2, 2007, 09:38 PM
Man! People are desperate for something to complain about. "Packing Heat'? Now, that is inocuous. "Killing" is a far worse term. Or "abuse". or Lock and load. Even "lets give our plan for Iraq a chance" is far more destructive in lives. Give me a break! Why not talk about the important things?

glassman
May 2, 2007, 10:21 PM
I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that. Sounds a little 'hollywood'. Can't say it bothers me though.

spooney
May 2, 2007, 11:11 PM
I have been known to use it myself...I rather like it.

theken206
May 4, 2007, 01:47 AM
no the term doesnt bother me in the least.


"its pritty dameaning but i think its used more by the ''punks'' or ''gangsters'' then everyday people"

everone keeps saying this, IME I have to disagree.

"strapped" "holding" "heated" are the far more common are terms your most likley going to hear in that social circle.

I dont think ive heard that one in a long time with relation to "underworld" types at least where Im from.

Its going to be more along the lines of "yo homie, you holding the burner"?? or "sup *igga you strapped up/heated" ect ect ect

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