Which revolvers stack the most?


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Geister
May 3, 2007, 04:24 AM
Which revolvers stack the most? When I mean 'stack', I'm talking about the increase of pressure needed through the trigger pull in DA mode.

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Sundles
May 3, 2007, 10:57 AM
Every one rants and raves about how wonderful a Pythons double action trigger is, but they stack. How badly is a subject of debate, but bad enough.

Old Fuff
May 3, 2007, 11:17 AM
Smith & Wesson revolvers that are larger then the J-frame series have leaf mainsprings, and if properly adjusted the felt tension slightly decreases after the hammer has traveled through about ¾ of its travel. Older Colt double-action revolvers had a “V” mainspring that could stack if the two leaves came together before the hammer had reached full-cock. Again, careful adjustment would eliminate most of the felt stacking.

Later Colt’s, Taurus, Ruger and J-frame Smith & Wesson’s, as well as most other current revolvers have coil mainsprings, and the increased tension on the trigger stroke is progressive as the hammer travels backwards.

Objectionable stacking is usually caused when the coil or “V” springs are totally compressed – or almost so – before the hammer has fully completed it’s travel.

MrBorland
May 3, 2007, 11:17 AM
From Cunningham's "What is a Good Trigger?"

From http://www.grantcunningham.com/good_trigger.html

Consistency (double action only): when a trigger has the same pull weight from start to finish, it is said to be consistent. Some triggers (Colt, Dan Wesson) continually increase their pull weight toward the end of the stroke, an effect called "stacking". Some triggers (S&W "J" frames) have a slight decrease in pull weight before the sear releases, while others start out at one weight, increase in the middle of the pull, then decrease at the end.

In general, the more consistent the pull the easier it is to shoot; however, some people like a bit of "stacking" in their actions, and shoot best that way. A gun with decreasing pull weight is slightly harder to shoot, and those with a "hump" in their pull are (at least for me) the hardest of all to shoot.

1 LT MPC
May 3, 2007, 04:39 PM
I like a little bit of stack--helps keep my squeeze honest.:D

DogBonz
May 3, 2007, 04:42 PM
however, some people like a bit of "stacking" in their actions, and shoot best that way.

It helps me know when the trigger will break.

Boats
May 3, 2007, 05:10 PM
My Colt DS stacks a bit towards the end. I actually consider it more of a feature than a bug. I know that the end of the rope is "right there." I have never had a problem with the mild stacking, but if the effect were larger, I can see how it would annoy.

I guess to be fair, my coil sprung Ruger GP-100 stacks a bit too. Again, it doesn't bother me, especially since the Ruger has been slicked up considerably and has 10/10 springs from Wolff.

My M38 J framed Bodyguard has the "humping" trigger pull. It is the toughest to anticipate. I almost hate it and count on adrenaline making it not matter if I have to stress fire it. One thing is sure, the J-frame trigger setup doesn't allow for as precise shooting because of the difficulty in predicting the hammer falling.

schmeky
May 4, 2007, 08:12 PM
I agree with Old Fluff.

My S&W 586 does exactly what Fluff stated. Why anyone would want the DA to stack is a mystery to me.

Nothing compares to the S&W DA and I have owned some of the best (including my new Python).

The worst "stacker" I can remember was a Dan Wesson I owned years ago.

I disagree with Cunninghams assessment, I have shot all manner of DA's and I shoot my 586 DA better than anything else.

S&Wfan
May 4, 2007, 09:01 PM
To stack, or NOT to stack . . . that is the question.

Colt always liked to have a progressively stiffer trigger near the end of the trigger pull . . . Smith disagreed.

The arguement will never be solved, for there are proponents of each philosophy.

IMHO, NOTHING beats the smooth, consistent double-action pull of a finely tuned S&W revolver . . .

Jim March
May 4, 2007, 09:16 PM
My old Charter Undercover has a weird stack. Near end of stroke it goes lighter, and then tightens a bit before release. So it's possible to do an "SA type" release with the DA trigger by holding it right there at the release point while lining up a precision shot.

It's otherwise quite smooth. Note that this is a late-70s-era critter from when Charter quality was at it's all-time peak...case-hardened hammer, fr'instance...

ADKWOODSMAN
May 4, 2007, 09:41 PM
I also agree with Old Fluff, my 586,624,629,57,28 and Redhawk all seem the same. Works for me.

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