Private firearm transactions, what personal info on the receipts?


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Mike U.
May 14, 2007, 03:18 AM
Title essentially says it all. I'm wondering what is proper form for that
all-important receipt in a private party transaction.
Do we put DL #'s on the receipt?
What form of ID should be asked for and provided by me(the seller)?

I know this should be a common sense thing, but, some forms of ID can be used to do naughty things. Like stealing your identity. :eek: Which, BTW, I'm still recovering from. Mine was stolen online because one of the many shooting supply places I dealt with stored my (and apparently other customer's) personal info like my account number, pin # and DL# in an online hackable computer. :fire: :mad:

This is a total CYA thing. I don't want officer friendly knocking on my door asking why a firearm registered to me was found at a murder scene two years after I sold it.

My apologies if this is an asinine question. :o

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kd7nqb
May 14, 2007, 03:50 AM
Here is what I included in my last transaction

Date
Sellers Name
Buyers Name
Firearms Serial Number/ Make/ Model

Both peoples address and phone

sellers DL#

A little short paragraph saying that the buyer released me from all responsibilty, the gun was as is and that the buyer was able to legally purchase a firearm under both state and federal laws.

Might be able to dig up the form I used. I just googled something like FTF transfer form and found one that was pretty generic.

Ala Dan
May 14, 2007, 05:42 AM
kd7nqb has given you all the correct information, as nothing else
is needed. Be careful with your driver's license; up until just recently, my
home state of Alabama use to put your social security number on the
face of your D/L; for everyone too see~! :( :scrutiny:

Zen21Tao
May 14, 2007, 06:29 AM
Legally: In Florida you don't need anything, even a receipt. Just money for gun.

Practically: kd7nqb's suggestion is great. All I would add is that you may want to have the buyer and seller both sign each copy and then you may want to mail your copy to yourself. This creates a legal date for future reference. For example, If, God forbid, you sell a gun to someone that ends up being used to commit a crime and the police end up at your door, you have a dated and sealed receipt that predates the crime.

aka108
May 14, 2007, 08:16 AM
Any firearms I dispose of are through a friend of mine who owns a gun shop. He charges 10 percent but the price he obtains is greater than what I would receive thru a totally private sale and the new buyer gets OK'ed thru the instant check program.

rbernie
May 14, 2007, 08:53 AM
This is a total CYA thing. I don't want officer friendly knocking on my door asking why a firearm registered to me was found at a murder scene two years after I sold it.
You have firearms registtration in FL?

wally
May 14, 2007, 09:13 AM
This is a total CYA thing. I don't want officer friendly knocking on my door asking why a firearm registered to me was found at a murder scene two years after I sold it.

Your receipt won't prevent this. If you are really worried sell only thru a dealer then you are not the owner of record any longer, but even then the police might still come knocking as unless illegal databases exist and are being used, the manufacturer/importer gets a call with the the serial number and says "Dealer A". Dealer A gets a call or BATFE looks it up in the records he's turned in if "out of business". Which still point to you unless you sell thru the same dealer you bought from.

Maybe some LEO here can chime in, but I suspect the utility of crime gun traces is mostly only of value for anti's to blame the "availability of guns" for the crime. Just about everything you see on TV about guns is wrong.

For example, If, God forbid, you sell a gun to someone that ends up being used to commit a crime and the police end up at your door, you have a dated and sealed receipt that predates the crime.

Unless noterized this piece of paper is of no more value than just saying "I sold it to Joe Smith". If noterized and other evidence points at you this paper still proves nada as you could have stolen it back from Joe later to do your crime (you know where he lives, your paperwork proves it!). If Joe did the crime he'll claim it was stolen or he sold it.

--wally.

M2 Carbine
May 14, 2007, 09:21 AM
I give no personal information to a stranger and I ask for no information.

Do you really want a complete stranger knowing such things as your name, address, driver's license number, etc, and that you are a GUN OWNER?

As far as,
This is a total CYA thing. I don't want officer friendly knocking on my door asking why a firearm registered to me was found at a murder scene two years after I sold it.

This seems to be a big frightening thing to a lot of people
Exactly just what are you afraid will happen?

I'll tell you what happens.
A gun I owned and sold was used in a killing (I don't know any details).
City detectives tracked me 1,400 miles and called me on the phone. The call lasted just a few minutes and consisted of me telling the detective I sold the gun a couple years ago and (legally) had no paperwork.
That was it. No black helicopters over the house or the ATF kicking down the door in the middle of the night.

Follow any state and federal laws that apply and don't worry about it.

paul
May 14, 2007, 09:35 AM
In every one of the numerous FTF sales I've been involved with, both buying and selling, the transaction was completed with minimum of fuss.
If I didn't know your name beforehand, I generally didn't know it after.

I follow the law to the letter with absolutely no shortcuts.
p

hso
May 14, 2007, 10:15 AM
Nothing required here. If I like their looks I check that their drivers liscence is in-state and leave it at that. If I don't, then there's no deal.

News Shooter
May 14, 2007, 10:26 AM
Where the peons are only allowed four face to face transactions a year by the way...each party has to fill out and sign a form FA-10 which includes each person's personal information.

It is gun registration:mad:

Derek Zeanah
May 14, 2007, 10:26 AM
I might ask to see a CCW permit via e-mail before the meeting if I have any doubts about the buyer, but I don't keep any records. Nor do I provide any.

I'm just a little turned off by the whole "firearm purchase receipts must be created and maintained forever" mentality that seems to be the norm nowadays. In a perfect world, none of my firearms would have any records attached to them, though even I get impatient and buy new on occasion. ;)

The only justification I can give for this other than "it creeps me out" is the experience one of our members shared during the DC Sniper Shootings, when he had a couple of MD cops show up at his door and essentially demand he hand his AR over for testing. I don't want to be placed in that position.

Especially if it ever comes to outlawing a particular brand/model/caliber of arm and I've never gotten around to properly disposing of mine...

Lone_Gunman
May 14, 2007, 11:38 AM
I have never asked for any personal information on guns I have sold, but I would not sell to someone that I was worried about to begin with. Under the law here, I can sell to another individual as long as I have no reason to believe they are illegal to buy a gun.

For those who require ID or other personal info, how do you know the ID is not fake?

AirForceShooter
May 14, 2007, 11:53 AM
I'm in Florida.
What reciept?

AFS

Glockman17366
May 14, 2007, 12:04 PM
I don't sell or swap guns very often.
The last time I did was for a revolver. We went through a FFL for this. I would do the same for a long gun (although I don't believe it's required in PA).

That 20 bucks for the FFL might save a guy a world of grief in the future...

Just my humble opinion!

HiWayMan
May 14, 2007, 01:20 PM
We look at each others ID's to confirm we are from the same state, then I get money and other gets gun or vice versa. There is no reciept or paperwork. And the deal always smells a bit like freedom, (except for that ID part).

Vaarok
May 14, 2007, 02:55 PM
For mailorder antiques across state lines or mailorder from in-state, I've usually just done the "Name/DL/I'm of legal age and not a crackhead, signed X" paper for the guy I was buying from. No idea what they did with it after they got it, but it seemed only fair.

The actual text I use is:

I [Vaarok] hereby certify and affirm that I am not a crazy, a crackhead, a wifebeater, child molestor, felon, fence-jumper, or other form of bad person, and can thus legally buy, posess, disassemble, reassemble, play with, weld on, drill, tap, modify, and even maybe have explode in my face, a pre-1899 antique firearm in my home town, county, and state, and hereby discharge the seller of any liability for any bad actions I could possibly make after I take possession of the item in question, even though I’m not going to.

vis-à-vis
May 14, 2007, 03:08 PM
I bought a gun from a friend but obtained no reciept. The fella has a CCW permit and I figure pretty legit. it was the only gun I have ever obtained that way. Should I get a reciept? Any laws requiring one?

SomeKid
May 14, 2007, 03:27 PM
is the experience one of our members shared during the DC Sniper Shootings, when he had a couple of MD cops show up at his door and essentially demand he hand his AR over for testing.

Derek, did you save the thread? I would love to read it.

If not, can you fill out the story more? (Did he "politely" slam the door for example?)

Havegunjoe
May 14, 2007, 03:29 PM
I would add a CCW permit. This implies that a background check was run. Here in MN we require a Permit to Purchase if you don't have a carry permit if you are buying from a store so I would require the same in a private sale. Both require a background check but the CCW is more extensive. I would photocopy all identification. You want to show you made a good faith effort to not sell to someone that shouldn't be allowed to own a gun.

Maximum1
May 14, 2007, 03:37 PM
You all are braver than I when it comes to selling private firearms. With all the litigation and risks involved with selling a firearm to a complete stranger I just don’t. Since there’s no way for me to check both State and Federal records to know whether this person can legally own a firearm (Convicted Felon, Mentality Ill, Restraining Order, etc.) all one needs is to sell a firearm to one of these and they end up using it illegally…The next thing you know the FBI is knocking on your door, or ATF or local Police, not to mention the potential law suits that could result. To me, it’s just not worth the risk.

I’d rather trade it into a license dealer (Yes, I understand for less than its worth) who in turn resells it.

That’s just me. :what:

Derek Zeanah
May 14, 2007, 04:01 PM
Derek, did you save the thread? I would love to read it. A quick search didn't find it -- Chaim was the poster if I recall correctly.

Maybe it was on TFL?

SteelyNirvana
May 14, 2007, 04:05 PM
Does anybody know the laws here in NC?. I sold a Norinco single shot 12ga to a coworker a few years ago and didn't bother to do receipt for him or myself. I knew him for about a year and he seemed pretty normal, a lil' slow at times but he was just a good ol' country boy. I don't believe he would ever do anything stupid with it but not sure if he even has the gun anymore. We both have left the place we worked at and I haven't seen him in two years. Should I track him down and get a receipt?

Derek Zeanah
May 14, 2007, 04:18 PM
OK, follow-up. A quick search on TFL makes me think the details are in this thread (http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1221643#post1221643) (actually that's to a link partway into the thread). If not, then it'll be a follow-up thread to that one.

Of course, it's possible I found the wrong one, too...

edit: nope, wrong one. Can anyone locate the post by a member here (and likely on TFL) who had the MD State Police come by to pick up his AR for testing?

Mannlicher
May 14, 2007, 05:08 PM
Recipt? We don't need no stinking recipts for private sales. :what:

with a private sale, I don't need, or want to exchange info. Cash on the barrel head, and a handshake. What I do with my gun sales and purchases is no one's business.

wally
May 14, 2007, 05:36 PM
You all are braver than I when it comes to selling private firearms...

The timid won't retain their Rights and Freedom for long!

--wally.

Mike U.
May 14, 2007, 05:43 PM
MANY Thanks to all of you who have enlightened me on this issue.
My fellow Floridians especially.
I know we don't have an official "registration" here in Florida, but I still have to fill out paperwork when I buy a gun from a dealer. And, in the future, I feel that could very well be used as a form of registration, God forbid!
After having my identity stolen last year, I've become all about CYA in every area of my life. This inquiry is just another aspect of that. I've bought and sold firearms among my close friends and family members, but, in my present state, I find I may have to sell some to strangers so I want to make sure I'm doing it right.

Thank you guys again for your excellent assistance!

Lashlarue
May 14, 2007, 06:01 PM
According to BATF regs you do have to have it transferred by a ffl. FWIW I did have the police come knocking on my door when a pistol that had been stolen in a burglary was used in a murder. They tracked me from Texas to Nevada.I had filed a police report and that got me off the hook.This was ten years after the fact....

foob
May 14, 2007, 06:16 PM
I just chat them up, talk about guns, invite each other to shoot. Probably not the smartest thing to do, but oh well.

M2 Carbine
May 14, 2007, 06:19 PM
"FBI is knocking on your door, or ATF or local Police."

And the problem is??

The answer is,
"Sorry guys, I no longer own that gun. I followed any and all State and Federal laws when I sold the gun and there is no law (in Texas) that says I have to get the buyer's name and/or address. So I didn't".



After having my identity stolen last year,

Mike, I think right there is an excellent reason not to give a stranger ANY information about yourself, especially in a private gun transaction.

I've Googled just my name and stuff came up that I didn't even know.:eek:

Mike U.
May 14, 2007, 06:32 PM
I hear ya, M2 CARBINE!

That's why I am absolutely elated about our laws here in Fla. now.
This state really is paradise! :D :D

nwilliams
May 14, 2007, 07:57 PM
I always make out a receipt whenever I sell a gun privately, whether I'm required to or not doesn't matter.

Why? Because if the gun I sell to someone is ever used in a crime and I have no way of showing I really sold, then I could be held accountable. Personally I want as much information as possible about the person buying the gun from me as I can get. Sure you can say to the authorities that you sold the gun when they come banging on your door, but I want documented proof, just to be on the safe side and be able to rub it in their face if they don't believe me. Then again maybe I'm just paranoid:rolleyes:

Date of sale
Gun make and model
Serial #
My name
Buyers name
Buyers DOB (if its not obvious their over 18 or 21)
My signiture
Buyers Signiture

Nothing too personal just enough to show there was a transaction made, does it make me 100% secure? No, but its just added protection. I then keep the sales reciept along with my stack of purchase reciepts (yes I keep all of them also) in a lockbox in my home. Mainly I do this out of habit, nothing formal just a hand written reciept that takes all of two minutes to write up prior selling. I think even more I do it because I don't trust the legal system:uhoh:

If the person wanting to buy my gun refuses to give me their information or signature, guess what, they ain't gettin my gun. You don't like it? Well then go buy from someone else. I would say that most of the guns I've ever bought privately I've been asked by the seller to sign a reciept, and I have never put up a fuss or refused to do so because they requested it. Personally I'm more comfortable buying that way because it tells me that the owner of the gun is trying to be responsible and has nothing to hide. Its the same way when I sell, if the buyer doesn't want to sign for it, it tells me that this person may have something to hide. I only base this on my perspective since I have no problem signing when asked because I have nothing to hide. However I do have a limit on how much information I'd give them and if they wanted more information from me than what I would ask from them in a transaction I wouldn't go through with it.

On an additional note, look how the media came down on the online gunstore for selling guns legally to that Va.Tech maniac. If you sold a gun to someone who went out and committed a horrible act of violence like that, not only would the media make you out to be the bad guy but the authorties wouldn't be all that kind to you either. To me the scenario is all too clear. You sell a gun registered to you to someone you don't know, that person goes out and commits a crime with it a short time later and ditches the gun. Later the police come knocking at your door with your gun in a plastic bag asking you all kinds of questions, you tell them you sold the gun, they ask "to who" and "wheres the proof"? With no idea who you sold it to, or any proof that you even sold it to begin with, you are now a suspect in a criminal investigation. Its a hypothetical situation,but a situation I want to avoid at all costs.

Just my 2¢

Derek Zeanah
May 14, 2007, 08:14 PM
If the person wanting to buy my gun refuses to give me their information or signature, guess what, they ain't gettin my gun. You don't like it? Well then go buy from someone else.That's totally cool. Just tell me this before I drive an hour and a half to pick it up. ;)

Byron Quick
May 14, 2007, 08:54 PM
I've never had a problem with private sales.

The only call I've ever gotten from law enforcement was about a year ago. Nothing to do with a private sale.

ATF was calling all the C&R licensees in the area after a shooting in North Augusta with a SKS. I hadn't sold or bought a SKS, told the agent, he thanked me, and hung up. End of story.

ED21
May 14, 2007, 08:54 PM
North Carolina requires one to obtain a handgun purchase permit ($5) from the Sheriff of the county in which one lives. this purchase permit allows on to buy one handgun. Another permit is required to buy a second and so on. The NC Concealed Carry permit does away with this requirement as the ATF has agreed that the CCH permit takes the place of the background check which the local Sheriff does prior to issuing a purchase permit. The permit is even required for private sales and stings are attempted to trip up private sellers from time to time. Especially when one tries to sell a handgun via classified adds.

BrianCraig81: here is the URL to the NC firearms laws pamphlet. http://www.jus.state.nc.us/NCJA/ncfirearmslaws.pdf

SteelyNirvana
May 14, 2007, 09:28 PM
I didn't see anything about the transfer of long guns, such as with my situation. I knew I had to get a PP to sell a handgun to another individual. I was mainly asking if I should get a receipt or not when transferring a long gun to another person.

Geno
May 14, 2007, 09:36 PM
Didn't see this yet. In have put both people’s names, addresses, telephones, the weapon’s complete and detailed description, the serial number, I.D. used to confirm who person is. In addition, and most important, I always include the date I sell the firearm, and the exact hour and minute the transfer happened.

Assume for a moment that someone committed a crime in the AM on X day, and sold you the firearm 1 hour later? Hmmm. Bad, bad, bad. If you have the exact hour and minute that the transaction was made, you're covered. Seems like a small detail, but, while it seems terrible to contemplate, it factually could happen. Lastly, witness(es) to the sale.

Doc2005

Jim K
May 14, 2007, 10:16 PM
A lot of bombast here, but just about any gun made in at least the last 50 years can be traced if someone is interested enough. The maker's records show the distributor, the distributor's records show the dealer, the dealer's records show the first buyer. Unless the buyer is dead, he can be found and leaned on. He may claim he doesn't know who he sold the gun to, but memory improves quite a bit if the police are really putting on the pressure. And the last owner/user will be glad to rat out the guy he got the gun from, so they play connect the dots.

I don't think I would like to be the first and recorded owner of a gun used in some tragedy and not be able to say who I sold it to. Things could get, to use an old term, "intense", and I hope I would have a good alibi.

Jim

351 WINCHESTER
May 14, 2007, 10:23 PM
I don't deal with private indivudals anymore. Too much liability. If I want to give my sister or 2 sons some guns there isn't any paperwork or papertrail. I've bought and sold so many guns in the past 40 years there is no way I could possibly remember as to when, to whom. I have sold guns to individuals in the past, but now I don't have to sell any unless I get a lemon and the mfg. can't make it work either, I'll trade it in to a gunshop that I don't care for and let them deal with it.

nwilliams
May 14, 2007, 10:30 PM
351...

I'm kinda in the same boat Its been well over a year since I sold a gun to someone in person. Now I go through gunbroker.com or put guns I want to sell on consignment through local gunshops. In either case I prefer the actual transaction be done through an FFL holder.

M2 Carbine
May 14, 2007, 10:52 PM
Jim Keenan A lot of bombast here, but just about any gun made in at least the last 50 years can be traced if someone is interested enough. The maker's records show the distributor, the distributor's records show the dealer, the dealer's records show the first buyer. Unless the buyer is dead, he can be found and leaned on. He may claim he doesn't know who he sold the gun to, but memory improves quite a bit if the police are really putting on the pressure. And the last owner/user will be glad to rat out the guy he got the gun from, so they play connect the dots.

That's not so.

If it was worth a million cash to me I could not begin to remember anything about most of the the dozens of guns I've sold to individuals. I couldn't even place the date of sale on most of them within 5 years, much less anything about the buyer or seller.
The ONLY buyers I remember is the people I personally know, that I sold guns to.

I couldn't pick the sellers, of my last four M1 Carbines, out of a line up if my life depended on it.


Like I said earlier.
I'VE BEEN contacted by LEO about one of my pistols being used in a killing and it was simply,
"I sold the gun". THE END.

nwilliams
May 14, 2007, 11:40 PM
Like I said earlier.
I'VE BEEN contacted by LEO about one of my pistols being used in a killing and it was simply,
"I sold the gun". THE END.

That may be true in your case but it doesn't mean that every LEO who calls or shows up at your door will be that nonchalant about it. Sometimes its better to be safe than sorry IMO.

HiWayMan
May 15, 2007, 08:40 AM
It looks to me like we don't need the Brady Bunch to push for gun registration, many of you are more than willing to do it for them through your love of an intricate paper trail and fears of "liability".

The solution is really quite simple. Don't buy new, don't sign papers.

harbinger_j
May 15, 2007, 09:36 AM
I keep records of almost all of my other transactions. When I buy something (non gun related) on ebay I give my name and address and email... that way I can receive what I buy.

If someone buys a gun from you FTF and wants to steal your identity he could shoot you and take your wallet. If you are going to assume that the person you sell a gun to is not going to shoot someone is it that much harder to assume they won't steal your identity.

You can always be brought in to legal problems if a lawyer or LEO wants you bad enough. If you are following the current laws in your state, keeping a record of that couldn't hurt you.

Lone_Gunman
May 15, 2007, 11:26 AM
Again, I will ask, how do you know if the ID they are showing you is real?


If you are worried about someone's character and think they might be a bad guy, you should not sell to them period, whether they show you a driver's license or not.

I would also point out that convicted felons who are released will have driver's licenses.

How does showing a driver's license protect you, if it could be fake, or if the person is banned from owning guns?

HiWayMan
May 15, 2007, 11:57 AM
The DL may well be fake, but by looking at it I have fullfilled my duty to not sell to someone from out of state to the best of my ability. That is all that is legally required for a FTF transfer.

Lone_Gunman
May 15, 2007, 12:03 PM
You can legally fullfill that obligation by just asking.

A driver license is not proof of legal residency.

I think you are fooling yourself to think otherwise.


Jim Keenan says:
Unless the buyer is dead, he can be found and leaned on. He may claim he doesn't know who he sold the gun to, but memory improves quite a bit if the police are really putting on the pressure.

They could lean on me all they want and I could not tell them to whom I have sold most of my guns, because I simply do not know. They could try bamboo under the finger nails, electric shocks to my privates, water-boarding, and even send me to Gitmo, but I can't remember things I don't know. Of course, before they did all that I would just say I sold them to Jim Keenan.

M2 Carbine
May 15, 2007, 12:21 PM
It looks to me like we don't need the Brady Bunch to push for gun registration, many of you are more than willing to do it for them through your love of an intricate paper trail and fears of "liability".


Personally, I kill the paper trail on guns every chance I get.:)

kellyj00
May 15, 2007, 02:02 PM
in Kansas, you don't need any paperwork.
If you're buying, don't expect paperwork. The seller usually wants to have no connection back to them either.

That's the whole point...it's our RIGHT to bear arms. Their shouldn't be any more work than buying a loaf of bread. Right to keep and bear Bread isn't even in America's owner's manual, like the RKBA is.

dave_pro2a
May 15, 2007, 02:12 PM
"receipts" BWHAAAAA HAAAAAA HAAAAA HA HA HA HAAAAA

Some folks get brainwashed by the liberal anti-gunners ;)

Step one: pay cash.
Step two: accept firearm.
Step three: part ways.

dave_pro2a
May 15, 2007, 02:13 PM
Quote: "A driver license is not proof of legal residency."

In some states it is. Some states require 'proof of residency" in order to issue a license (i.e. current phone bill in your name).

Maximum1
May 16, 2007, 11:21 AM
According to BATF regs you do have to have it transferred by a ffl. FWIW I did have the police come knocking on my door when a pistol that had been stolen in a burglary was used in a murder. They tracked me from Texas to Nevada.I had filed a police report and that got me off the hook.This was ten years after the fact....

Goes right to my point....You can make the choice to ignore the risk...But it is what it is.....You can be held LIABLE. Some make it sounds like you have to sell privately in order to insure our Second Amendment Right (???), OK?

My two cents.....

M2 Carbine
May 16, 2007, 12:12 PM
You can be held LIABLE.

Probably hundreds or thousands of guns are transferred every month between individuals.
No doubt some are later used illegally.
If being "held LIABLE" is actually a problem, the Internet gun sites would be filled with stories about, "I was "held LIABLE", after selling a gun legally.

So, please post some cases where a person has been criminally charged or "held LIABLE" after they legally sold a gun to another individual.

Maximum1
May 20, 2007, 08:22 PM
Probably hundreds or thousands of guns are transferred every month between individuals.
No doubt some are later used illegally.
If being "held LIABLE" is actually a problem, the Internet gun sites would be filled with stories about, "I was "held LIABLE", after selling a gun legally.

So, please post some cases where a person has been criminally charged or "held LIABLE" after they legally sold a gun to another individual.


Earth to M2 Carbine, don't know what world you live in but if you want to take a chance selling to UNKNOWN buyers and risk a civil lawsuit go right ahead and keep on selling anyway you want...That's your Right. As for me (as I stated earlier) I'm not brave enough... I worked too many years to give my money away over a (on average) less than a $400.00 gun....Risk to reward ratio is way out of balance so it doesn't make financial sense. But that's me.

P.S. I'm not going to spend my Sunday afternoon proving anything to you.... Good luck in the future.

Lone_Gunman
May 20, 2007, 08:49 PM
Earth to M2 Carbine, don't know what world you live in but if you want to take a chance selling to UNKNOWN buyers and risk a civil lawsuit go right ahead and keep on selling anyway you want

Well let me ask a stupid question...

How will the UNKNOWN buyer be able to name me as the seller, if neither of us know who the other is?

busy_squirrel
May 20, 2007, 09:10 PM
In this state, cash and maybe a smile is all that's necessary as far as i know.

So I try to know as little as possible when selling. No need to. And I don't want to start keepng records. So far I've always known a name and that's enough for me. If the 5-0 come asking, I'll pass along the name and gun serial number as that's all I know. After all, detective work is for detectives right?

However, I've always bought FFL so the guns were in my name and presumably not stolen. I guess that's part of the reason I don't mind selling for cash, I assume it was clean when I sold it.

Outlaws
May 20, 2007, 09:14 PM
My last transaction when something like this.....

[wipe finger prints off firearm, then drive to meeting location]

Me: Howdy.
Buyer: Hello.
Me: [handing over rifle] I just don't shoot it much anymore.
Buyer: Thats nice. [works action] You say $250?
Me: Yeeep.
[money exchanges hands]
Me: Enjoy.
Buyer: Thanks a lot.

[speed off to purchase a new toy]

Paperwork? This ain't no gun shop.

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