Removing a Squib load


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357mag357
May 16, 2007, 07:46 PM
:banghead: I was shooting 38 special out of my Ruger GP100 6inch barrel. Bang, bang, poof. I am glad I heard it before pulling the trigger again. I tried to hammer it out using a wooden dowl and a rubber mallet. I sprayed lube in both end and started to hit the wooden dowl and then crack. The dowl broke right at the end of the barrel. There is not enough wood left to pull it out. What do I do now? Gunsmith or send it to Ruger? :banghead:

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Black Knight
May 16, 2007, 08:46 PM
You might try drilling a small hole in what's left of the dowel rod. Then screw in a nice size screw or eyelet and pull the dowel out. Then try a brass punch to knock the bullet out. Use a brass punch not a steel punch. The steel punch might damage the rifling.

LubeckTech
May 17, 2007, 01:39 PM
Once the dowel was out I would (and do) use the largest brass or aluminum cleaning rod possible. A brass punch would be ideal but I don't know where to get one unless someone made it. I have an old brass cleaning rod I keep for just such occaisions.

WayneConrad
May 17, 2007, 02:13 PM
Gunsmith?

wally
May 17, 2007, 03:03 PM
Just go to a good hardware store and get a 5/16" brass or aluminum rod, and cut it to be an inch or two longer than your barrel. Then drive out the squib with a hammer. Usually needs more force than a wooden dowel can exert. Brass or aluminum is strong enough yet soft enough to not scratch the bore.

I/4" would probably work, it has for me in the past if 5/16" can't be found.

If its in far enough that the cylinder will turn, I'd try to find the 5/16" rod as you will be surprised by how much force it takes.


No shame if sending it back to Ruger or a gunsmith you you don't feel up to the task. But if you reload or shoot surplus ammo its worth having the tools to fix on hand. I keep a small (nut big enough) hammer and aluminum rod in my range bag so such an event doesn't ruin my outing, of course if you fire than next round after the squib you'll really have a bad day!

You can buy "squib removers" from various sources, but most I've seen are too short for a 6" barreled gun.

--wally.

DogBonz
May 17, 2007, 03:11 PM
I have always wondered… Could you just shoot a blank or two. And maybe the pressure would push it out. Or maybe the gas would just escape through the cylinder gap? Just a thought.

ZeSpectre
May 17, 2007, 03:14 PM
Good brass rod can be had from Michaels arts and crafts (usually, sometimes they are out).

If you have no other option you can get a smaller steel rod and wrap it up in electricians tape but this is an absolute last resort and I take no responsibility for potential damage to the gun.

EDIT: On second thought, forget the steel rod entirely, if you are to that point then take it to a gunsmith and let them hammer it out.

wally
May 17, 2007, 03:23 PM
Depending on how far up the bore the squib is, a blank runs the risk of "ringing" or bulging the barrel. I'm sure it'd get it out though.

--wally.

Ayden
May 17, 2007, 06:02 PM
I have never had to deal with this, but...

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I have always wondered… Could you just shoot a blank or two. And maybe the pressure would push it out. Or maybe the gas would just escape through the cylinder gap? Just a thought. I don't know about a blank, but if your a reloader you can shoot it out just by loading up a piece of brass with a primer and the proper amount of powder for that bullet and you can shoot it out. It really does work.

357mag357
May 18, 2007, 07:01 AM
I have tried in the past on an other gun to remove a squib with just a shell and primer. There was no powder or brass projectile. The primer alone could not generate enough pressure. Anyway, I brought my Ruger to my local gun store because the owner thought his gun smith could fix it. He took one look at it and said we are sending it to Ruger. He did say it should be 100% after. The bad part is it could take 30 days. Not sure of the exact price either. 20 dollars to have the gun store ship it "OverNight". I think Ruger charges 50 dollars an hour. This is a costly mistake. :(

highlander 5
May 18, 2007, 07:17 AM
3/8 inch brass rod and a brass mallet is one thing I keep in my ammo box for such occasions. I would steer clear of aluminium as its soft and any debris left in the barrel would damage your barrel. Aluminium is HIGHLY abrassive.

Archie
May 19, 2007, 02:28 AM
My local hardware store (Orchard Supply Hardware in PDSR California) sells threaded brass rod in various diameters. I believe 5/16" is the biggest size that fits .38/9mm caliber. A 16" rod is fairly cheap, all things considered.

brickeyee
May 19, 2007, 03:08 PM
"I don't know about a blank, but if your a reloader you can shoot it out just by loading up a piece of brass with a primer and the proper amount of powder for that bullet and you can shoot it out. It really does work."

You will not produce the correct pressure this way, and will have no idea what will actually happen.
Powder burning rate depends on pressure and temperature, and pressure and temperature depend on burning rate.
Most handgun powders are completely burned in normal loads before the bullet has moved more then an inch, and faster powders may have completely been consumed before the base of the bullet clears the case.
Without a bullet to provide the immediate rise in pressure after primer ignition the pressure is usually lower, but a squib may act as a barrel obstruction and produce a sharp rise in pressure at a place that is not designed to withstand it. The result is a ringed barrel.

mballai
May 19, 2007, 11:54 PM
This must be a dark cloud over GP 100s because my gun got a squib just yesterday and it ain't coming out with a squib rod either. Brand new gun.
I'll see if they can just send it off to Ruger because our gunsmith won't be back for two weeks.

357mag357
May 20, 2007, 09:19 AM
Sorry to hear about your gun Mballai. My dealer sent mine to Ruger on the 5/18/7. I will keep you posted on the outcome and cost if you want. Worst case senerio is they will just replace the barrel. Hopefully that wont happen. Where you using factory or reloaded ammo?

mballai
May 20, 2007, 12:56 PM
It was a reload that the guy behind the counter gave me. I was having some light strikes with my own reloads and I wanted something to test it against. Bad move. Probably the most accurate gun I had ever fired and then this.:mad:

If it was my own reload I'd kick myself. But it wasn't. Haven't had a squib in many thousands of rounds and they've always pushed out before.

xring44
May 20, 2007, 01:58 PM
I picked up a push rod (opens and closes the valves)from a gasolene engine, round steel ball on each end, it won't deform like brass and there is nothing to scratch the bore, the ends are highly polished, works for me.

357mag357
May 20, 2007, 04:55 PM
Xring,
Do you have a picture of it? I am not sure what you are talking about.

xring44
May 20, 2007, 08:54 PM
If the batterys are up on my camera, I'll post one in a few minutes!

This is a poor quality photo, my camera's about had it.:D

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v293/xring/100_0287.jpg

The ball mic's .312, the rod .288 and is approximately 6" in length

357mag357
June 21, 2007, 06:46 AM
Because I had my gun dealer send the gun to Ruger they could not give me much info. First they said they received the gun on May 21. I guess it takes one month to just look at the gun. Second, they could not tell me a price because I was not the customer the dealer was. They did tell me they would have to remove the barrel. I will give more details when my dealer calls me. :(

Onmilo
June 21, 2007, 10:48 AM
If a squib rod won't remove the bullet by itself try this,,,,,
And I must add this will usually only work with a tight fitting squib rod. sometimes you may be able to use a brass or aluminum cleaning rod if it fits tight but I use specifically turned squib rods.
This also works great if your squib rod is too short for the problem barrel.

Fill the bore in front of the bullet with penetrating oil,
Cap the muzzle with a good dollop of modeling clay.
Insert the squib rod and tamp the clay down enough to begin hydraulic action.
Get everything all nice and adjusted and give the rod a decent smack with a rubber or leather hammer.
You should be amazed at how easy the bullet pops out. HTH

Oh yeah. please remember to fully clean the bore before you begin shooting again.

tasco 74
June 21, 2007, 11:11 AM
this is the reason i ALWAYS look into a block of cases after charging them with the proper amount of powder to be sure each case has the same level of powder in em........................sorry to hear about your mishap.......there is lot of good advice here as always...........

357mag357
June 23, 2007, 05:49 PM
259.50 for a new barrel, labor, and shipping.:eek: Ruger will not remove the barrel obstruction just replace it with a new one. If I knew that I wouldn't have sent it to them in the first place. Hopefully I will have the gun in a couple of weeks.

highlander 5
June 23, 2007, 08:47 PM
don't use aluminum for a squib rod fist its to soft and second and most important aluminum is quite abrasive and if you don't get all the small bits out it will ruin your barrel. Years ago I worked in a small machine shop on secondary operations,deburring,tapping holes etc. I was cutting counter bores in stereo knobs made of aluminum with a carbide cutter and every 200 knobs I had to have the cutter re sharpened. Sand paper is made of ......aluminum oxide
would you shove sand paper down the barrel of your pistol,revolver etc I think not

ZeSpectre
June 23, 2007, 09:34 PM
It also occurs to me that letting some Kroil (http://www.jdheritage.net/DeerelyDeparted/Items/4001.asp)sit in the barrel for a day or two and then trying to knock the squib out might work. Every time I use it for something I'm more amazed at how Kroil can seep and penetrate and loosen!

tinygnat219
June 25, 2007, 08:52 AM
Try a wooden dowel, or brass rod with a mallet. The Kroil suggestion is a good one too.

Noxx
June 25, 2007, 09:08 AM
I've never had the problem, but I'm wondering if carefully drilling out the center of the obstructing bullet would create the space for the projectile to derform inwards under pressure and ease removal by the hammering methods suggested?

ZeSpectre
June 25, 2007, 10:01 AM
The drill idea might work but you risk really screwing up the inside of your barrel (or much worse your crown) if it slips.

Bad Flynch
June 25, 2007, 11:24 AM
If it is a lead bullet, then Brownell's has a nice, brass squib rod that they sell for .38s. If it is a jacketed bullet, my gunsmith generally uses a closely fitted, smooth steel rod to pound it out. Any small marks left by the smooth, closely fitted rod are better than the price of a new barrel.

Yosemite**Sam
July 2, 2007, 04:54 PM
In the past I've used a brass punch and a bench vise to press a bullet out of a 9mm barrel. I imagine a bench vise or C-clamp could be configured with a brass punch to force the bullet out of the barrel. Special attention must be paid to avoid damaging the crown.

mballai
July 4, 2007, 09:18 PM
Since Ruger doesn't remove squibs and the cost of a new barrel is high, my dealer had my gun sent back and my gunsmith got it out for me. I don't know what the magic trick was, but I heard the word vise being used. Probably takes a lot of pressure to push some squibs out. Shoots just fine.

357mag357
July 10, 2007, 09:00 PM
Got the bad news from the dealer. 257.00 for a new barrel, labor and shipping. I still don't have the gun either. Spoke with Ruger two weeks ago and they said it would take about eight weeks for everything. This coming Monday the 16 will be eight weeks. I am having withdrawls.

orionengnr
July 20, 2007, 08:29 PM
Most handgun powders are completely burned in normal loads before the bullet has moved more then an inch, and faster powders may have completely been consumed before the base of the bullet clears the case.

Assuming this were true, why is there a fireball evident from so many loads? And why so many reports of unburned powder especially in 38/.357 Mag loads in a 1 7/8" barrel?

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