Thinking about a Mosin...


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nobody_special
June 18, 2007, 08:17 PM
It's pretty expensive to feed my M1A as much as I'd like, so I'm looking for some less expensive plinking fun. That leads me to 7.62x54R, the surplus of which can still be had for about $0.10/rd. plus shipping.

So... a few questions.

What to get... I'm looking at anything from those $35 Chinese Type 53, to Russian 91/30 or 38s, or even the faux sniper (http://www.southernohiogun.com/mn.htm) versions (I saw these, as well as a Finnish rifle, elsewhere too... lost the links though). I'm looking for something that is reasonably accurate: a good shooter, not minute-of-elephant-at-100-yards. I'm also (obviously) looking to keep it relatively inexpensive.

The ability to mount a 'scope would be nice, as my eyesight isn't the best. I saw a thread which indicated the S&K insta-mount works well, though apparently it's a scout-scope mount?

Also, Mosin-Nagants have a reputation for strong recoil. Would the recoil be noticeably stronger than that of an M1A?

So, what sayeth the forum? :cool:

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ArmedBear
June 18, 2007, 08:21 PM
Would the recoil be noticeably stronger than that of an M1A?


An unmodified M38? Heckyeah! Jackhammer to the shoulder.

A 91/30 with a Limbsaver on it? Not nearly as bad.

M1A has very low perceived recoil for a .308, IMHO. It's a heavyweight gas-operated semiauto with a heavy op rod. Recoil doesnt get much softer than that (same with a Remington 1100 semiauto shotgun).

nobody_special
June 18, 2007, 08:59 PM
Thanks... maybe the 91/30's are the way to go then. When I got it, I was pleasantly surprised at how light the M1A recoil is.

Anyone have experience with the el-cheapo "sniper" rifles like the one I linked to?

KINGMAX
June 18, 2007, 09:03 PM
RECOIL = I love it

cheygriz
June 18, 2007, 09:33 PM
Just get a $95 M44 and be done with it! Great little rifles!:D

sharkhunter2018
June 18, 2007, 09:39 PM
Mosins are great rifles. Cheap rifles and cheap ammo. I have a M44 and a 91/30 PU sniper. Both are awesome shooters. If you get one, they tend to multiply. Next on the list are a M39 and a standard 91/30.

ECVMSparky
June 18, 2007, 10:08 PM
Just get a $95 M44 and be done with it! Great little rifles!
+1 to that, just got one today, this thing is beautiful, no way are you going to get this much rifle for under 200.00 again.

Antipasta
June 18, 2007, 11:20 PM
Being kinda old fartish, I could live without another bayonet (have an SKS), so I got a M38...and get the small limbsaver.

nobody_special
June 18, 2007, 11:27 PM
Antipasta -- yeah, I can do without a bayonet too. Figure the thing I'm most likely to stick is myself...

Texas Colt
June 18, 2007, 11:46 PM
Don't forget about the 91/59 carbine. It's the same size (20" barrel) as the M38 and M44 and it doesn't have a bayonet either.

The 91/59 is basically a standard 91/30 that was arsenal modified into a carbine. I just got mine on Friday. It's great. Now I'm waiting for the ammo to show up on my doorstep.

Cosmoline
June 18, 2007, 11:52 PM
For the love of Pete, if you can afford an M1A you can afford a Finn! Get one while you still can. I'd suggest an M-39 or a late model M-91 or M-30. Any of these will eat modern commercial ammo as well as just about any ball surplus.

Gator Monroe
June 19, 2007, 12:02 AM
M38 (With original furniture and matching#s) 44 or 45 Izzy !

Texas Colt
June 19, 2007, 12:05 AM
Here's my 91/59 with all matching numbers.

DANGERRUSS
June 19, 2007, 12:17 AM
Where could one find a 91/59?????

Texas Colt
June 19, 2007, 12:24 AM
DANGERRUSS, they are getting harder to find, but I found mine on gunbroker.com. Check auctionarms.com as well.

Babarsac
June 19, 2007, 12:33 AM
AIM Surplus has very good prices on Mosin's...I think the only version they don't carry is the 91/59. But I have an M38 being shipped to my door for about $90.

Green Lantern
June 19, 2007, 12:49 AM
I have a 91/30....unless the "limbsaver" is standard equipment that they come with straight from the cosmo, then I don't think the recoil is bad at all.

Heck, I shot mine this morning. First time I'd been shooting since shooting my Glock 19, and flinching so badly that I came here to ask for help! Whereas this morning with my Mosin, I only did so once. Yeah, I've got a few red marks on my shoulder that are a little tender IF I prod them hard enough. It does recoil, but just not badly - IMO! But, I wouldn't know how it compares to the M1A...

BTW, I'm not one of them muscle-bound strongmen either. Frankly I'd classify myself as a "wimp." ;)

benelli12
June 19, 2007, 01:20 AM
For a target and fun shooting gun, I'd go with the 91/30. Mine will shoot around 3-3.5" MOA with surplus(Albanian&Bulgarian), I bought it from classic arms for $69.

My M44 is fun to shoot, but after a while the (for me) the recoil can become distracting and I start to flinch from that and the noise. It is LOUD, and breaths a big fireball, which is kinda cool, but impractical, and dosen't help when your trying to get better at long range shooting.

Both the long and short Nagants are fun for shootin' stuff. But I suggest getting the 91/30 as your first Nagant, and then go on to buy the other ones,(which you will, it is impossible to buy just one);), and they're so cheap, why not have them all:o

Ohio Rifleman
June 19, 2007, 01:24 AM
I just got myself an M44 at a gun show and I absolutely love it! If a little noise and recoil don't scare you, that's the Mosin for you. I just like to shoot stuff. I really don't care if I can't hit a shotgun shell at 100 yards with it. My M44 is just a fun gun.

Geno
June 19, 2007, 01:28 AM
If the recoil bothers you, get a recoil shield. They come in various sizes (thicknesses). Mosin 91/30 and M44...how sweet! Might also look at SKS.

Doc2005

Hoppy590
June 19, 2007, 01:36 AM
get a 35$ t53. its basicly a M44. so you can judge recoil on you own. its a conversation piece as it sure as heck looks like it toured 'Nam even if it may not have. and at 35$ + transfer, you wont regret it, even if you only fire it once

Added: i believe century has 91/59's. they are not listed in the web page or fliers, but try calling

TimboKhan
June 19, 2007, 01:40 AM
I have an M38 and an 91/30, and I sort of prefer the 91/30. I like them both, but for whatever reason, I just like the 91/30 a bit better.

Recoil is not bad, at least for me. I am not particularly recoil sensitive, but I do have a bad shoulder that lets me know when I am done shooting, and I have yet to get sore (at best) or break down into tears (at worst) from shooting my Mosin. I think they are a extremely fun gun to putz around with, and I will not be without one again.

Also, you can buy what they call "short range" ammuntion. I have a few boxes from a store in Fort Collins that sells ammo, and it is nice. I actually don't know the technical specs because I don't think the box says it, but the round feels, literally, very light. These rounds are non-corrosive and very easy to shoot, and seem to deliver good accuracy at fairly short ranges, say 150 yards and in. They are more expensive that regular old 7.62x54, but not by a whole lot.

silverlance
June 19, 2007, 02:16 AM
cosmoline is right about the finns. you should get one while you still can. military gun supply has a good selection, although you ahve to spend about 300. for that money though you get a gun that can rival damn near any m1a if you do your part. and, when the going gets tough, you have a damn good club. the finn m39 also has the best bayonet friendly grip that ive ever felt in a rifle, too.

nobody_special
June 19, 2007, 06:50 AM
military gun supply has a good selection, although you ahve to spend about 300.

Really? I googled them, but don't see any... the Finn models are scarce.

BTW, thanks for all the replies. I'm leaning toward a 91/30, but a 38 or 91/59 would be fine too. (Actually... how much extra velocity do you get from another ~ 7" of barrel?)

KimberTLE.45
June 19, 2007, 09:15 AM
my 38 couldnt hit the broadside of a barn....

24kshooter
June 19, 2007, 09:34 AM
For high volume shooting to keep your skills up it time to buy a nice 10-22 or CZ and a good scope. The 54R's are fun to shoot for 20 rounds or less at a time and after that they will not help you unless you want to practice flinching. The Finn 29's have the best stock configuration but they will still get your attention. If you want more sizzle get a 17 HMR - a 17 will put a smile on your face for $.20 per shot.

crazed_ss
June 19, 2007, 09:36 AM
My M38 doesnt seem to be very accurate either.. I've only shot Greek Olympic ammo out of it which I hear isnt the best stuff.

Picknlittle
June 19, 2007, 09:44 AM
My last trip to the range with my SKS and Chinese T53 MN was quite telluing,,..on me.:)

My Mosin was hitting hard left, the SKS was hitting hard right. I've got the windage on both really close now. With me shooting (and I'm having some issues with my eyes ghosting the rear sight), I'm getting 2' groups with the mosin, and three " groups with the SKS at 50 yds. At 100 yds I'm getting a bit worse at 4-6" with both, but I know it's an eye thing.

I let another shooter shoot them both Sunday at 50 yds. He had a five shot group with one ragged 1/2" hole and one hole off 3/4" to the left with the Mosin. That group was 1" right , 2" high. He shot about a 1 1/2" group with the SKS, but it's hitting about 6" high. I need the tool to raise the elevation on the front sight.

Point is these guns shoot great, especially the T53. I experimenting with a sighting aperture on the right lense of my shooting glasses. Some test with apertures in cardboard have proven helpful. Gotta fix the eyes!

CajunBass
June 19, 2007, 10:39 AM
I've got a couple of the T-53's. I haven't shot them yet, but they sure look like they'd kick like a mule. That steel buttplate looks pretty hard.

What's that limbsaver a couple people mentioned?

edited to add: Never mind. I found them.

Picknlittle
June 19, 2007, 01:25 PM
I didn't get the Limbsaver because I couldn't find it in teh Midsouth Catelog. I did get this one though and my T53 is a *****cat now.

http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item.asp?sku=0001004418

Cosmoline
June 19, 2007, 01:51 PM
For finns, check Wholesale Guns and Ammo (WGA) and Empire Arms. WGA has a lot of M-39's and Empire has M-91's. You can also check the swap and sell on the collector's forums on gunboards.

The recoil of Mosins is NOT THAT BAD. I've fired off hundreds of rounds at a sitting without trouble. It's on par with .30'06. People just think they recoil a lot because they're not used to steel buttplates and they see a big flash and blast.

ArmedBear
June 19, 2007, 04:11 PM
All of the above considered, I'd be inclined to get a Howa package rifle in .223.

Ammo is noncorrosive, accurate, low-recoil and available cheap at Wal-Mart (7.62x54R is also at my Wal-Mart, though it's far more expensive).

Gun is accurate and fun, but not too expensive.

Depends what you want out of it. I have a few milsurps, myself.:D But I don't expect much out of them, accuracy-wise. I don't even shoot all of them, really. I just bought some of them because I figured that soon, they'll be gone. Too many older shooters tell me stories of $20 M1 Carbines. Then they show me their carbines. Mosins don't seem to be drying up, though. Guess the Russkies made tens of millions of them, maybe more.

ArmedBear
June 19, 2007, 04:19 PM
People just think they recoil a lot

Horsepuckey, at least WRT the M-38.:D

I shot my M-38 along with my .30-06 hunting rifle (walnut Weatherby stock with recoil pad, IMO the best stock ergo's for me, bar none, vs. the M-38 original stock, about the worst stock fit of anything I've ever shot, plus a steel buttplate).

Of course the round is about like a .30-06. It's the gun that makes the difference. I shoot a fair number of shotgun rounds through various guns, and one thing you learn from shotgunning is that stock shape and fit matter a LOT, both for practical accuracy and for perceived recoil. A lot of rifle shooters don't even know what stock fit means, but shotgunners can be obsessed with it.:)

I could shoot my .30-06 all day. Not the M-38. Recoil as experienced by the shooter is influenced by a lot of things other than the round!

The narrow, sharp-edged, plate steel buttplate, the relatively light weight and the utterly terrible ergonomics of the carbine added up to a hurting shoulder. I don't give a crap about the show a gun puts on -- I learned to shoot a rifle using a .50 caliber muzzleloader with a brass crescent buttplate. I judge by how my shoulder feels after 10 rounds, not by the muzzle blast, flash, smoke, etc.

Now, put a Limbsaver on the thing, and it does improve a lot, both because of the padding and the longer LOP.

But if someone wants to do volume shooting, I'd go with the full-length rifle, not the carbine.

Or put on an aftermarket stock, though that kinda defeats the purpose of shooting a classic.:)

Cosmoline
June 19, 2007, 05:59 PM
You probably weren't holding it right. I've shot an 1895G with B Bore loads. That's a lot of recoil. I've shot the same loads out of a No. 1. That's even more recoil. I've fired high octane Rottweil loads out of a little dinky Ithaca pump action. It was memorable. The Mosin isn't that bad. It's mid-range. It does have some recoil, yes. But as long as you get into the zen of the rifle it's not going to hurt you. I've put tens of thousands of rounds out of every major Mosin type, and I'm by no means resistant to recoil.

nobody_special
June 19, 2007, 06:10 PM
Thanks Cosmoline! Niiiiiice. :D

Is there any concern with using a pre-1898 receiver? It'd avoid the FFL fee and a 150 mile round-trip drive... I don't have a C&R, and I"m not terribly interested in getting one.

24kshooter, I have a 10/22... it's fun but mostly gets used by my gf. ;) I like the idea of shooting 7.62R since it's similar in power to the 7.62 NATO I use in my M1A.

ArmedBear, the Howa looks interesting but it's a more expensive proposition, even with a Finn M39, I'll come out ahead if I want any quantity of ammo. And mostly, the point here is to save money since 7.62/.308 is so expensive. Besides, if I were to get an intermediate cartridge, I'd really want a semi-auto... and then my gf would end up with it again. ;)

Bazooka Joe71
June 19, 2007, 06:19 PM
The first round out of my m44 was the only one that was a bit shocking...I didn't know what to expect out of it because I had never been around one being fired before...Long story short, its up there was my most favorite guns to shoot...Its gets more range time than most of my other guns.

ArmedBear
June 19, 2007, 06:23 PM
You probably weren't holding it right. I've shot an 1895G with B Bore loads. That's a lot of recoil. I've shot the same loads out of a No. 1. That's even more recoil.

Both of those guns are infinitely superior on the ergonomics scale, at least to me.

The gun didn't blow me back or anything. I've shot heavier-recoiling guns, too. What it did was bash my shoulder, and I was holding it as right as the stock design would allow. I'm speaking specifically about an original M-38 carbine, not the 7.62x54R round, not the M-38 with a Limbsaver added.

It's as good a toy as any, but, bottome line, the M1A is far more pleasant to shoot. As long as one expects this, then one will end up better satisfied. Furthermore, I didn't say I will never shoot my M-38s again, just that they don't feel nearly as good as some different designs, including the M1A.

Now maybe the Mosin stock fits somebody. It must, or they wouldn't have designed it that way. But it doesn't fit me.:)

http://www.surplusrifle.com/mosincarbine/graphics/m38.jpg

http://www.surplusrifle.com/m14m1a/graphics/full.jpg

http://www.weatherby.com/_images/products/rifles/vgd_sporter.gif

Cosmoline
June 19, 2007, 06:48 PM
Is there any concern with using a pre-1898 receiver?

Nope, esp. not with the Finns. You will often see little pips in the steel of the receiver on Finnish Mosins. That's the marks left by their smiths checking the strength of the steel. Those rifles were put together by the likes of Tikka and Sako, so quality isn't usually an issue. The only real problems I've had with Finns is some are fussy about poor quality ball (esp. the early M-27's, M-28's and others with tighter chambers and bores). And some have been shot enough to wear out the ejector/interruptor spring. But that's easy to replace. The bores are usually very good because the Finns switched to non-corrosive primers long before the Soviets did.

I've ordered two or three M-39's from WGA and never had any problems with them. They're good about posting photos of any flaws. Generally you'll pay more to get mint condition or rare issue M-39's, but that doesn't mean they'll be better shooters. Any recoil issues are negated with the M-39 because it has a nice Westernized semi pistol grip stock and weighs over nine pounds. They're great for shooting mass quantities of ammo. They don't heat up nearly as fast as the thinner barrel soviets, and almost seem to have been designed from the outset to be shot all day long at advancing red army men:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KuNe0YC4Ck

(the first battle in "Talvisota")

Harry Paget Flashman
June 19, 2007, 08:50 PM
The thing about Mosin Nagant's is to just go ahead and buy them 5 at a time and try for the quantity discount. I bought mine onesy-twosies until I got smarter and bought them by the 2's and 3's. I've got two 91/30's, five T53's, a 91/59, an M39 and an M38. Just today I picked up a spike bayonet for the 91/30. I also found some Argentine Mauser stripper clips in a parts bin for 25 apiece.

What I'm buying next is an M44 to convert to this if I can:
http://www.classicarms.us/REDRIFLE.jpg
Everyone needs a stealth rifle.

(Image found at Class Arms. Inc.)

flynlr
June 20, 2007, 05:34 AM
The thing about Mosin Nagant's is to just go ahead and buy them 5 at a time and try for the quantity discount. I bought mine onesy-twosies until I got smarter and bought them by the 2's and 3's. I've got two 91/30's, five T53's, a 91/59, an M39 and an M38. Just today I picked up a spike bayonet for the 91/30. I also found some Argentine Mauser stripper clips in a parts bin for 25 apiece.

What I'm buying next is an M44 to convert to this if I can:

Everyone needs a stealth rifle.

(Image found at Class Arms. Inc.)

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=3475806#post3475806

http://tinyurl.com/3y8ant

thats a good looking rifle. bling bling.

Old Time Hunter
June 20, 2007, 09:54 AM
If you load 'em with 28-30 grains of H4895 behind a 150gr LRNGC, they shoot just fine. About 2100fps compared to Wolf 150's@2700, but felt recoil is almost half, mostly due to the slower burning powder. Paper does not know the difference!

nobody_special
June 20, 2007, 11:21 AM
Would I have to feel guilty for shooting corrosive ammo through an M39? (I am compulsive about cleaning...)

Edited to add: cleaning aside, I live in the desert, so the integrity of my steel is probably doubly safe. Salts require some humidity to cause corrosion.

KaiserBen
June 20, 2007, 12:48 PM
Would I have to feel guilty for shooting corrosive ammo through an M39? (I am compulsive about cleaning...)

I do it all the time with mine. Just make sure you clean it thoroughly afterwards. Granted, mine's no safe queen, it's been around the block a few times (and a few more for good measure); it has <10% bluing remaining, and the interrupter is worn out, but it still shoots excellently and has a wonderful trigger.

nobody_special
June 20, 2007, 01:03 PM
thats a good looking rifle. bling bling.

My reaction was more like...:what: :scrutiny: :rolleyes:

:D

Okay, one final question... what's the rationale in choosing heavy ball vs. light ammo?

Edited - make that two final questions. Many are advertised as "80% blue" or "10% blue" etc. -- presumably the finish has worn off. Does this have significant practical (corrosion?) implications, or is it purely cosmetic?

Cosmoline
June 20, 2007, 02:17 PM
Some rifles shoot better with heavy (180-200 grain) bullets, some better with the lighter weights in the 140 grain range. You need to shoot an array to find out what a particular rifle favors.

Noxx
June 20, 2007, 02:34 PM
Great sire for Mosin info http://www.russian-mosin-nagant.com/index.html

I own a 91/30 and an M44, they're great, cheap, fun rifles with actual historic value... did I mention cheap?

I prefer the russians, for historical reasons. Take your time buying em, they're all cheaper than dirt, but the quality varies wildly. Most of the stores that sell em don't seem to differentiate arsenals at all, my 91/30 is a 1940 Tula (woo, I win!) that I picked up for the same $80 as the fours Izhevsk's next to it.

Buy a headspace gauge, most of these rifles have seen severe service and / or poor maintenance.

Edit: include blurry peekture! (too much coffee)
http://www.noxxshouse.com/pics/mosins.jpg

lathedog
June 20, 2007, 03:01 PM
I have had good results with M91/30's. I have a Finnish "SA" marked gun that shoots way way better than I do.

They can be finicky with some of the steel case ammo out there, but seem to all like wolf brand with the heavier bullets.

I also have a few boxes of reloadable (boxer primed) brass that I load with Remington brand 180 gr .311 soft points (bulk pack from MidwayUSA and fairly cheap) on top of a moderate/light load of 4895. Very pleasant to shoot, and prints to a center hold at 100yds with the rear sight at the battlesight setting.

I have an M44 that has real issues with any kind of ammo and likes to shoot minute-of-barn groups and sometimes put rounds through the target sideways. No ideas, seems to have a good bore, maybe has throat erosion or muzzle damage. When I get back to it I will have to try recrowning and a chamber cast with cerrosafe. Still goes bang.

The biggest problem I see with other shooters is the way they hold the old military bolt guns. I've found that they are much more controllable if held more parallel to the torso, i.e. a right handed shooter is standing looking 90 degrees to the right of the target, with the rifle pointed right at the target, turns his head to the left and kinda lays the head down onto the stock like you were bad in class. I'm not sure I explained that as well as I could, but I see guys at the range all the time standing straight on to the target like they are staring it down or something.

For the <$100 a MN will cost you, what is the downside?

ECVMSparky
June 20, 2007, 09:01 PM
Armedbear:Now maybe the Mosin stock fits somebody. It must, or they wouldn't have designed it that way. But it doesn't fit me.

They were designed with a shortened stock to accomadate heavy winter clothing.

Harry Paget Flashman
June 20, 2007, 11:14 PM
Nobody Special.

Okay, one final question... what's the rationale in choosing heavy ball vs. light ammo?

My rationale is that I like the "Thump" and at Aim Surplus they sell the 183 grn heavy ball, brass cased, 1950's Bulgarian ammo inside a 300rd sealed galvanized can for $32.95. If you fire your Nagant a lot it ejects easier than with the lacquered steel case ammo.

nobody_special
June 21, 2007, 01:29 AM
Thanks everyone... I'm taking the plunge. I just ordered a boatload of ammo, half Bulgarian heavy ball and half Hungarian steel-cased, and there's a particular M39 that has caught my eye... :D

Avenger
June 22, 2007, 01:24 AM
Another thing to remember is that they come with a sling for a REASON, and it ain't to make it easier to carry around. Wrap the sling around your fore hand and use it to PULL the rifle back into your shoulder. It's called a "hasty sling" technique, and it WORKS.
I didn't get a sling with my M44, and didn't use one with it until I got a "bonus" one with my 91/30. Last week at the range, I was about 75 rounds into the day when I realized that my shoulder wasn't hurting nearly as badly.

nobody_special
June 23, 2007, 07:21 AM
So, I just ordered an M39 :D ...decided I like the Finn stocks much more than the Russian ones, and I can be more confident of getting an accurate shooter this way. I know you people like to see pictures, so here it is courtesy of gunsnammo.com:

http://www.gunsnammo.com/3411X-2.JPG
http://www.gunsnammo.com/3411X-1.JPG
http://www.gunsnammo.com/3411X-3.JPG

VKT, 1941, 80% original blue, new bore, matching bolt, war time stock with initials "SR" on the butt. There doesn't appear to be a cartouche, just the initials. I assume it was re-barreled at some point if it has a "new bore." With a 1941 production date, I'll bet this gun saw some action. :scrutiny: Makes one wonder... if rifles could speak, what stories could this one tell?

I couldn't justify a really nice one since I'm going to actually use it. That said, would it be considered bad form (or otherwise undesirable) to sand and refinish the stock, and perhaps touch up the metal finish? Or should I leave it as-is?

Cosmoline
June 23, 2007, 04:04 PM
Excellent choice!

Technically, all Finns have been re-barreled. The Finns never made receivers, they just used old Russian receivers--mostly from M-91's. So to make an M-39 they would combine an old receiver with a custom brichwood stock with a new barrel often made by Sako or Tikka. They did not really rearsenal rifles on the scale the Soviets did, so you don't find them with expanding bores. They used non-corrosive ammo and never had the problem of accelerated bore wear. So a "new" bore may well have seen some action. "SR" looks like trench art. There's a lot of that on Finnish rifles. I've seen some with distinct kill notches.

That said, would it be considered bad form (or otherwise undesirable) to sand and refinish the stock, and perhaps touch up the metal finish? Or should I leave it as-is?

That one looks like it's in very good condition. I wouldn't mess with the wood unless it's badly dry or saturated with grease. Usually they aren't. If you want to be accurate about it, the current theory is to use a pine tar wood finish to give it that Finnish black look. Old down east finish, for example. Like they use on boats. Or you can just use BLO if you like the look of the wood.

Any steel that's lost blue will likely have picked up a nice grey/brown patina. This actually works as well as blue and I've never had problem with rust on Finns, even when they're 40% or less blue. Rebluing will look terribly wrong. They used their own process and I'm not aware of anyone who can duplicate it. You'll either get a way too shiny blue or a dull blue that comes off when scraped.

You will likely find the M-39 heavier than a Soviet Mosin. It weighs near nine and a half pounds. The advantage to this heavy construction becomes apparent when you start capping off hundreds of rounds at the range. The barrel is heavier than a Soviet and designed for sustained shooting.

If you open it up you may find little brass shims at the stock/wood contact points. These were put there to tune the rifle for accuracy, and generally work very well. Just make sure your receiver screws are hand tight.

Texas Colt
June 23, 2007, 09:59 PM
I finally had time to stop by my friends ranch and test fire my 91/59 today. I was running errands with my better half, so I only fired four shots, but wow! I can't wait to put some more bullets down range with it. Tons of fun and I had no trouble hitting my 12" gong at 50 yards with the first shot!

I have read on other threads about how addictive the Mosin Nagants can be... now I understand. I definitely see more Mosins in my future. And since I have two pickups, I certainly need at least one more - one for each truck :D

Nameless_Hobo
June 24, 2007, 12:06 AM
The biggest problem I see with other shooters is the way they hold the old military bolt guns. I've found that they are much more controllable if held more parallel to the torso, i.e. a right handed shooter is standing looking 90 degrees to the right of the target, with the rifle pointed right at the target, turns his head to the left and kinda lays the head down onto the stock like you were bad in class. I'm not sure I explained that as well as I could, but I see guys at the range all the time standing straight on to the target like they are staring it down or something.

Excuse my MS paint (lack of) skills, but is this what you mean?

http://img502.imageshack.us/my.php?image=howtoshootnagantuh6.png

I suck, I can't get it to post the image, but it should hotlink to it

Hoppy590
June 24, 2007, 01:57 AM
for a mosin, stated simple. Square up to the target son!

Mauserguy
June 24, 2007, 03:55 AM
Mosins are beautiful rifles. Just check the general condition, and the condition of the bore.
Mauserguy

aaronrkelly
June 24, 2007, 04:01 AM
You want the Russian 91/30 (around $70). Longer barrel means better accuracy and less muzzle blast. Extra weight means less recoil.

If your wanting even more accuracy, better finish and more collect ability then score a Finnish rifle. You can score a SAKO rifle for $300ish and a Match Grade gun for around $350. These will be your best bet for accuracy.

This is my $60 91/30 from SOG.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w193/aaronsguns/All%20Guns/M9130.jpg

PAPACHUCK
June 24, 2007, 09:05 AM
I finally got a chance to go shoot my M38 yesterday and let me tell you, it's a thumper! I like that, though. After 25 rounds, I moved on to my other new toy, a Siaga .308. I'm very impressed! I wish I would have bought one of these sooner.

I like big booms!

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