HELP! I lost my gun!


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RandomFool
June 26, 2007, 11:28 PM
Dear THR,

I am in desparate need of your help. I have done a terrible thing. This morning on my way to work, I got my keys, cell phone and wallet together with my daily carry piece and extra mag which I keep in my car at work. I set my gun and magazine on the roof of my car while I filled my pockets and started to dry a load of laundry before I got in the car. I was in a hurry, because I was a little late.

I drove to work and worked all day, and drove home at 5 this evening, the usual time, and as I do every day, check the compartment where I keep my gun to make sure it is still there. It wasn't, and neither was the spare mag. I thought I must have just left it at home because the car didn't look broken into, since I have left my gun at home on occasion.

When I got home after a little while I started to get nervous about my handgun. It wasn't anywhere to be found. When I remembered that I left the gun and magazine on the roof of my car in the morning, I ran to the garage, and amazingly the spare mag was still there but the gun was GONE! It was in an Uncle Mikes grippy IWB holster, so I have already traced all of my driven steps with a friend (which is only two highway exits away) and found nothing.

I am so worried and scared that someone found it and is playing with it or something awful. I am scared as heck and I don't really know what to do! I had the idea to call the local police station using SKYPE or something untracable to ask if anyone had turned in a handgun today, remaining anonymous, just to hear if they had. I don't care about the gun, if I never see it again. I just want to know someone isn't going to rob a store with it or blow their friend's head off, but at the same time I don't want to go to prison, if in fact that's what would happen, even though I probably deserve it.

I am of course writing with an alternate name because I am so embarassed about this I don't want anyone to know about it. I think I will never carry again.

PLEASE someone give me some advice.

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GigaBuist
June 26, 2007, 11:35 PM
I'd post your state of residence in the thread. Some have requirements with regards to reporting stolen handguns. Michigan is one.

With that others might advise you on what to immediate actions you should untake to legally protect yourself.

RandomFool
June 26, 2007, 11:38 PM
I'm in Washington State.
But the problem I have is that it wasn't actually really stolen! I don't know the legal repercussions of essentially throwing a loaded gun in the middle of a field and leaving it. Can I report it stolen without having to explain just exactly how it was stolen?

Oh man my stomach hurts. I've never been literally sick with worry before.

igpoobah
June 26, 2007, 11:41 PM
Call the cops and report it lost. Better now than after someone uses it for the unmentionable.

RandomFool
June 26, 2007, 11:41 PM
I'm going to go do another lap. I'll come back and read your responses very soon. I can't just sit here.
I'll respond to any questions or anything in about 15 minutes.

HeedJSU
June 26, 2007, 11:42 PM
Lost, stolen, report it. As long as it's legally yours in the first place, I don't think you have anything to worry about. Your bigger worry comes when 10 years down the road a pistol registered to your name is used to commit a crime. Tell them the truth. they're human; they'll most likely understand.

REPORT IT. You'll be fine.

Justin

Don Gwinn
June 26, 2007, 11:47 PM
If it's not where you left it or where you lost it, then somebody took it. Tell the cops what really happened.

Don't bother posting about it on a message board; there's nothing we can do about it.

I sincerely hope you aren't some poster from Robyn Ringler's blog who thinks it's really funny to pretend the Wooding case is being repeated.

Assuming you're serious, read this link (http://blogs.timesunion.com/underfire/?cat=9) to see what could happen if your gun is out there in public somewhere and some kid picks it up. I don't post this to scare or sicken you, just so you understand that there are worse things than embarassment.

Logically speaking, the chance that someone took it off your driveway but left the loaded mag there is nil. That means the mag fell off and the gun didn't, so you're right to check your route. Check it some more.

Call your local TV station and tell them anonymously that someone lost a pistol along that road? People need to know somehow.


Again, if you're some chowderhead from Ringler's blog (http://blogs.timesunion.com/underfire/), this isn't funny.

JCF
June 26, 2007, 11:47 PM
Personally, I would report it. Regardless of what the technical legal obligation may or may not be.

Bezoar
June 26, 2007, 11:55 PM
you must be crazy or trolling for a news article if you havent reported a missing gun to the local police. Its the most basic thing to do when a gun dissapears. For one thing, as long as it is considered NOT LOST/STOLEN by police, any crims commited with it are pined on your own ass, and not the 16 year old who may have foudn it in the ditch and knocked over a gas station with it.

AndyC
June 27, 2007, 12:01 AM
Responsibility comes along with gun-ownership - report the loss.

RandomFool
June 27, 2007, 12:24 AM
I have called 911 and am waiting for a deputy to call me now. The mag was actually still on the roof of my car when I got back, not on my driveway.

If you all aren't to disgusted at me, I'll post whether they're about to arrest me or not.

sig228
June 27, 2007, 12:28 AM
If it's not where you left it or where you lost it, then somebody took it.

Huh?

If it's not where you lost it?????????

LOL!!!!

(From a moderator.............more LOL!!!):rolleyes:

igpoobah
June 27, 2007, 12:29 AM
I wouldn't have called 911, just regular police # should suffice. But what's done is done.

People make mistakes, by admitting that now you could save yourself a lot of liability later.

There shouldn't be any arrest; it's not a crime to lose a gun. Irresponsible, yes, but I doubt it will ever happen to you again. Lesson learned.

lanternlad1
June 27, 2007, 12:34 AM
Losing a gun isn't a crime. You are human, just like the rest of us. Any one of us could have done that - beating yourself up is counter productive.

Just make sure you have the Make, Model and Serial Number to give the police. It's important you report it, just in case it has been found and might be used in a crime. Reporting it stolen will help absolve you of guilt in the (hypothetical) crime it is used in. I just hope it wasn't an expensive gun too. That would be the rotten icing on a crappy cake.

S&W620
June 27, 2007, 12:38 AM
Just try to relax. You have done the right thing by calling the police, so just wait until they arive and tell them what happened.

Keep us updated.

RandomFool
June 27, 2007, 12:40 AM
Alright, I just got off of the phone with the deputy. I'm kind of a fat guy, but I think I know what it's like to suddenly weigh hundreds of pounds lighter:

Someone found my gun on the freeway at 3:00.

This means that from 8:30 am, when I drove to work, the gun was run over nonstop until 3:00. He said my gun is a little scuffed.

The gun was a Taurus PT145, and was bought last week. I haven't even had a chance to break the darn thing in! I have fired it for functionality though.


He said he didn't think I would be in any trouble, but I should bring my box, reciept, and CPL (WA st CCW) in to prove that I am the owner and get it back.


Lesson learned is an understatement. I am never carrying ANY OTHER WAY than IWB. If it's not on me, it's not with me, period. If I continue to carry, that is.

Thanks for your help THR. I have had a few experiences with police that have been 99% incredibly negative, so I was hesitant to call the station. Thanks for helping me do what was, in the end, obviously the right thing to do.

nvshooter
June 27, 2007, 12:45 AM
You got lucky, RF. Next time, give your heat the attention it deserves because of what it is. I always devote my full attention to where my guns are when they are not under my bed-- even when I am at the range with my fellow clubmembers. I trust no one with my steel...

S&W620
June 27, 2007, 12:52 AM
Glad to hear everything worked out for you.

igpoobah
June 27, 2007, 12:54 AM
That pistol will have character now, and a good story to go with it. Consider yourself lucky. Glad it was found by a good guy.

RioShooter
June 27, 2007, 12:57 AM
The gun was a Taurus PT145, and was bought last week.

By any chance is this your first gun?

old_22LR
June 27, 2007, 01:01 AM
Your not ready to own a firearm! People like you make it easier for anti-gun nutts to come down on gun rights.

sig228
June 27, 2007, 01:04 AM
.....the gun was run over nonstop until 3:00. He said my gun is a little scuffed.

Sounds like a real life "Guns and Ammo" tortute test. It will be interesting to see if it fires.

Zundfolge
June 27, 2007, 01:11 AM
...from 8:30 am, when I drove to work, the gun was run over nonstop until 3:00. He said my gun is a little scuffed.

http://www.glocktalk.com/images/smilies/postpics.gif

kingpin008
June 27, 2007, 01:21 AM
Your not ready to own a firearm! People like you make it easier for anti-gun nutts to come down on gun rights.

I'm sorry, but I'm gonna have to agree. If I'm carrying a pistol intended to save my life, I'm going to know where it is AT ALL TIMES. Not just because I may need it, but because as a concealed carry holder, it's my duty. I understand that you may have been running late, but that's no excuse. Think if some neighborhood kid had come along as you were busy puttering with the laundry, and capped himself or someone else with your gun. Pure accident, but a purely STUPID one, and totally preventable.

I'm glad that you ended up getting the pistol back, but make no mistake that it was luck that made it happen. Once again, that person who found the gun could have kept quiet and done some bad, bad things with it and it would have been preventable had you been more responnsible and given the weapon the attention it demands.

Archie
June 27, 2007, 01:27 AM
"Keep your words soft and sweet, you may have to eat them."

I'm glad everything's okay, RF. This is one of those 'one time' mistakes. You'll remember this lesson for a good long time.

igpoobah
June 27, 2007, 01:28 AM
Look, it's a rookie mistake, I'm sure you folks who are coming down hard have made rookie mistakes. I certainly have. Hopefully we survive and learn from them.

Why don't we try to encourage safe behavior and act as a mentor rather than tell someone they are not fit to own a firearm? That seems counterproductive to me.

obxned
June 27, 2007, 02:08 AM
Call the cops and your insurance agent ASAP.

skinnyguy
June 27, 2007, 02:38 AM
I learned in my CCW class last week that EVERYONE will become complacent at some point in time. Everyone will do something careless, stupid, or downright dangerous because it has become as much of a habit as reaching for the light switch in a dark room. (my words, not his).

It turned out you just had your time, it was worse than some, not as bad as others. You LEARNED something, though, didn't you? I'll bet good money you don't do that ever again. Because as the instructor said, you'll make some dumb mistake, you'll know you did it, and then you'll pay MUCH more attention from that day on.

Glad things worked out well for you.

outerlimit
June 27, 2007, 02:45 AM
Your not ready to own a firearm! People like you make it easier for anti-gun nutts to come down on gun rights.


Another great supporter of the Second Amendment.

I'm sure you've done something very stupid in your life as all of us have. If not, you're not human.

Mortech
June 27, 2007, 02:45 AM
Damn , that was that bump I felt on my way too Seatac this morning . Well I'm glad you got it back and yes now it has character .

jeepmor
June 27, 2007, 02:50 AM
Yes, please post pics when you get it back. Lesson learned. Some are learned through others, some are learned the hard way by experiencing them yourself directly. You are not the first person this has happened too, and definitely not the last.

I make it a habit NOT to leave my home with my CCW even exposed to any wandering eyes. This insures I have it on my person either in my pocket or in it's IWB holster some place secure when I get in the car.

Bob R
June 27, 2007, 03:22 AM
Glad you got your gun back, and I am sure you will never do anything like that again.

OTOH, now that the slide to frame fit has been tightened up a little, it may shoot better. :evil:

bob

RandomFool
June 27, 2007, 04:40 AM
Thanks for the responses. I will of course be posting photos when I get the gun back tomorrow morning. I work all day so I'll post them in the evening.

It's sad that sometimes it takes a mistake to learn a lesson. If the gun doesn't work right, I think I'll keep it, as a reminder, instead of having it fixed, or at least keep the scratches.

As for whether this is my first gun or not, that's a big no. I've owned guns for years, but I haven't carried for much more than a half a year. Not fit to own a firearm? Maybe. I've left my wallet on the roof of my car the same way more than once, does that mean I'm not fit to own a wallet?

I guess I have to follow a rule that the gun is either on me or at home. None of this glovebox crap. I need to know where they are at ALL TIMES, which I normally do.

I would like to extend a thanks to those who replied in kind and with understanding. A few hours ago I was at the brink at the brink of losing it with guilt and confusion. I realize now with a calmer mind that it was obvious what I should have done to begin with, but it's not always so clear when you're the one in the situation. A lot of "How could this have happened?"'s are running through your head at the same time can make it harder to think.

Stay tuned, for tomorrow come the pictures.

mnrivrat
June 27, 2007, 05:07 AM
A few hours ago I was at the brink at the brink of losing it with guilt and confusion. I realize now with a calmer mind that it was obvious what I should have done to begin with, but it's not always so clear when you're the one in the situation.

Your first post did indicate this and I have to confess I thought you to be a bit hi-strung for a CCW holder. Thinking you would be in trouble for loosing the weapon & reluctant to report it , seemed rather over the top and frantic .

Glad you have calmed down, but remaining cool headed should also be part and parcel with the responsibility of carrying a weapon. We all make mistakes, it's how you deal with them that counts - stay calm my friend.

lanternlad1
June 27, 2007, 06:51 PM
So you are a licensed psychiatrist I take it? :banghead:

The guy was going through a stressful time and reached out for help. Next-day negative armchair quarterbacking is not help. 2nd'ers have to be supportive of one another. To quote a founding father, "If we do not hang together, we will all hang seperately."

AndyC
June 27, 2007, 07:16 PM
Glad it ended well, for everyone concerned :)

CountGlockula
June 27, 2007, 07:19 PM
Glad you got it back. Lesson learned...life goes on.

bg
June 27, 2007, 09:05 PM
Bet ya won't do that again..

mnrivrat
June 27, 2007, 09:51 PM
So you are a licensed psychiatrist I take it?

If your refering to me the answer is NO - I'm not THAT screwed up !

My point was meant to be constructive in nature, not condemning. If it sounded condemning then I apoligize to the OP .

The fact of the matter is that I was left wondering wether the seeming very nervous OP could hold it together if being in a situation as stressful as needing to use that CCW. He sounded very much like he was loosing control in the post.

That's an issue all of us who carry needs to do a soul search regarding.
I know - just my opinion - but I'm going to express it anyway.

GRIZ22
June 27, 2007, 10:39 PM
Call the cops and report it lost. Better now than after someone uses it for the unmentionable.

If it's not where you left it or where you lost it, then somebody took it. Tell the cops what really happened.


+1 for the above comments.

Keep in mind that there are times when LEOs lose guns too. One of the guys I worked with had his j frame in a thumb snap holster and had commuted on his motorcycle for years never having any problem. He had worked 4-12 so he was going home in the dark. That night the gun fell out of his holster. He called each police jurisdiction he passed through to report it. It was found by a patrol car just after sunrise. It was run over a few times and had some scars on it but it was repairable. While the circumstances here may display some negligence on the part of the owner it's even more negligent not to report it.

Creature
June 27, 2007, 10:53 PM
Do like we do in the military...check sheet everything!

IN>IL
June 27, 2007, 11:23 PM
We all make mistakes when we get complacent around our firearms. The don't deserve respect... they DEMAND respect.

I accidently shot myself about a year ago, and now every time I pick up one of my pistols, I rack the slide seven times to be 100% certain there is not a round in the chamber. It's just one of those things that is a result of a stupid mistake.

Furthermore, friend, there should not have been any doubt about calling the police. You really need to study the Washington laws concerning gun ownership because I am sure you'll have no problem with the same sort of irresponsibility for quite some time. You may even need to search your soul and look for your moral compass, being that you had trouble wondering whether to call the police concerning such a serious matter. The police, and public, needs to know when something like this happens to ensure public safety. I'm sure you know this by know though!

RandomFool
June 27, 2007, 11:32 PM
http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o41/mistrpeter/IMGP2580.jpg
Overall gun is not in bad shape, all things considered.

http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o41/mistrpeter/IMGP2582.jpg
Detail of the back. The sight was moved to the extreme left. This was fixed with just a regular old allen wrench and eyeballing the center. I can fine tune it later.

http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o41/mistrpeter/IMGP2583.jpg
Muzzle detail. Also not too bad. Not a single ding on the barrel.

http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o41/mistrpeter/IMGP2581.jpg
The control levers took the biggest beating, but they're all cosmetic. These things are made of tough stuff, because they all still functioned just fine.

The overall state of the firearm was fairly good. Functionality of the gun was still alright, although very grainy. Nothing could be moved without sounding like the gun was chock full of sand, which is more or less was.
After disassembly (which went as it should have with no unusual snags) I blasted most of the innards with CLP a time or two and wiped it down. It was a bit tricky to blast out the crap that was in the safety lever, but I eventually got it so the operation of the gun was clean again.
Then I have taken a high-grain sanding tool on my dremel and evened out the rough spots on the slide (there were very few and not all that large as you can see on the pictures) so that it wouldn't tear apart my holster, and followed that up with a buffing wheel and some polishing compound. Now the gun just looks like it has a history to it, when in reality, I haven't even shot it yet! (well, not really anyway).

If you're still curious I'll let you know how it shoots on Friday.

As for the comment about keeping your cool, to you I say that I will probably never know whether I can take the stress of defending myself in a serious situation. I can however, say that I would still much rather have the option of using deadly force if it need be, and finding I don't have the gall to use it, rather than not having the tools I need to get out of a situation alive. Besides the fact that this situation was very different. It was a sick-with-worry kind of situation, not a fight-or-flight situation. I can't say that they have all that much in common.

In my defense, I would also like to make it clear that once I realized I would not find the gun, I knew I had to call the police. After that point, I knew that I would, I was just nervous as to how, or what would happen. I will admit though, that it is probably a bad thing that I wanted to call the police as a last resort. Until now however, they haven't given me much reason to trust them.

On that note, I will say that every LEO I dealt with during this ordeal was nothing but understanding, professional, reassuring, and kind. I have a new founded respect for officers of the law.

yhtomit
June 28, 2007, 12:04 AM
That's incredible! (That you got it back.) Glad it all worked out! I am a bad one for leaving stuff on the car roof etc, and sadly I'm not the only one in my family to be so afflicted -- so far, I'm still paranoid enough about my guns that I've not yet left one of those around, but I think everyone has the occasional "Whoopsie!" moment of either realizing that such a thing has just happened, or thinking for a brief moment that it has.

(And if you know what a Saab 900 looks like -- a sexy hatchback -- imagine what that giant rear hatch sounds like if you start driving highway speeds with it poised in the air, when the wind decides that is shuts NOW. It's ... loud.)

old_22LR
June 28, 2007, 01:17 AM
Hey if some p.o.s. gang member would of found that gun and killed a cop you guys would see my point. Thank goodness it didn't happen. I have carried for over ten years and never made a mistake like that. I have made mistakes in my life just like everyone else. Never with a firearm. When ever its with me I know where its at. This guy treated this gun like if it was a cell phone or a hamburger. To me my firearm is a life or death situation not a phase or an accessory.

JLStorm
June 28, 2007, 01:23 AM
hey, I bet you dont feel as dumb as the secret service agent that left his gun in the pocket of the seat in front of him on a commercial flight last year...it was found by the cleaning crew later that day :eek:

GRIZ22
June 28, 2007, 01:29 AM
hey, I bet you dont feel as dumb as the secret service agent that left his gun in the pocket of the seat in front of him on a commercial flight last year...it was found by the cleaning crew later that day

JL, I think that was done by...no kidding...an Air Marshal! Another left their gun in the men's room.

I spent over 30 years as a LEO, most of that time as a firearms instructor and I have a slew of "I lost my gun stories".

LightningJoe
June 28, 2007, 01:34 AM
We've all made stupid mistakes. That doesn't mean we give up the RKBA. If only perfect people could handle guns, well, that wouldn't leave very many people.


Of course, I once left a loaded, automatic rifle in the bathroom. So, it's possible I don't know what I'm talking about.

JLStorm
June 28, 2007, 01:40 AM
JL, I think that was done by...no kidding...an Air Marshal! Another left their gun in the men's room.



I could have sworn I read it was the secret service, but your version is even more funny!! lol

The-Fly
June 28, 2007, 01:42 AM
you made a mistake, and learned your lesson. No one got hurt, and thats the most important part.

.cheese.
June 28, 2007, 01:49 AM
RandomFool - honest mistake. Crap happens unfortunately.

I disagree with those who say that you're not ready to own a gun. People do make mistakes. It doesn't matter if it's with a gun, a car, or anything. People are human... enough said. If this was the 5th time this had happened, then it would be different - but I highly doubt you'll ever make the same mistake again.

Not to mention I've heard the same story before essentially. The whole "gun on car roof" scenario seems to happen more often than I'd guess. I suppose I should feel fortunate that my gun goes on my him when I wake up and off when I go to bed. Habit makes things easy. There is no inbetween.

Glad it all worked out. Can you imagine the shock of the guy who reported it on the road?

xpun8
June 28, 2007, 02:01 AM
RF,
Where was it found? (Exit #'s)

We all make mistakes, some more costly than others. I left my "planner" on the roof of my car (Kirkland Park Place), gone forever. One credit card was used at the (then) Texaco across the street for $15. Then they went to Bellevue Square and proceeded to spend more than $5000. That was all because I waited until I finished running my errands to call the CC company. I didn't loose too much money, thankfully. Five years later, guy from bar across the street from Key Arena calls me and asks if I am missing my planner. I had forgot that I lost it, but the guy new my name and my number and described a picture of my truck I'd sold more than 6 years before. Turns out the place was getting a new roof, the roofers gave it to the manager of the place. I went down to get it, I was surprised to find my Watermark fountain pen still in it, the nylon shell looked like it had spent 10 years in the Seattle "sun".

I glad everything worked out for you. Where are you shooting on Friday?

TimboKhan
June 28, 2007, 03:33 AM
JL, I think that was done by...no kidding...an Air Marshal! Another left their gun in the men's room.

Clearly, that air marshall is not ready to own a gun. I bet he is high strung too.

Look, it was a very stupid mistake, on that I think we all agree. The key word there is "mistake", and gun-related or not, we all make them. I am betting that many of us have made more than one, even. Everytime I see someone riding proudly upon their silver-maned stallion of morality about some facet of gun safety, I think about the fact that the sainted Jeff Cooper once had an accidental discharge.

Mistakes happen. Learn from it and move on.

skinnyguy
June 28, 2007, 04:02 AM
One thing I've learned over time, lost wallet, lots of coffee, camera, etc., if you want to set something on your car, put it on the hood. You'll see when you forget it and get in.

Once again, glad it all turned out good, and you learned something.

RandomFool
June 28, 2007, 04:39 AM
Posters who mention that I'll never do it again are right. I most certainly never will. This is exactly why I'm using a different/temporary name to post this story.

I'm a pretty tall guy, and the top of a car is perfect shelf height for me. *sigh*, I need to get a truck or van or something.

jeepmor
June 28, 2007, 05:23 AM
Of course, I once left a loaded, automatic rifle in the bathroom. So, it's possible I don't know what I'm talking about.

Boy, imagine sitting down to releive one's self and seeing that.



Glad you got it back and it went well with the LEOs. Thanks for posting pics. It looks like it took a tumble and went to a side of the road out of the way. I could just imagine seeing that on the freeway in the middle of the road.

911 call --- Umm, I think I just spotted a pistol in the road at exit 123. No I couldn't stop, it's rush hour, please send an officer before some meth head finds it and gets smeared by traffic trying to get it. On second thought, no rush.

Cork
June 28, 2007, 06:54 AM
All humans are falliable and make mistakes. Pilots run out of fuel and crash, we get off the wrong floors on elevators, take the coffee pot out while it is still dripping, forget to lock a door, most mistakes are just lapses without any consequences. You made a mistake and a honest citzen did the right thing.
Almost everyone who carries full time can be expected to have a Accidental Discharge in their lifetime, mine gave me nightmares for weeks. You actually were smart (knowing or not) in having the pistol unloaded so if a kid picked it up and played with it ...
Develop habits that help, for example I never carry a pistol in my briefcase, to much risk of forgetting it is there and taking into my office which is a serious infraction of company policy.
Cork

ceetee
June 28, 2007, 09:56 AM
Look on the bright side: It's a Taurus. Lifetime warranty. Even if it's not functioning 100%, mail it to Miami, and they'll fix it.

Geno
June 28, 2007, 10:12 AM
You need to get a holster, and put the thing away. You should never set a pistol or revolver on anything other than a vault shelf to lock it when not in use, or carry it in a holster when in use!

I have seen several newscasts of police who have walked off and left their service pistol 1) on top of car, 2) on the crusier seat, the door was open, keys in the ignition and engine running, 3) on top of candy machines, 4) in bathrooms, etc., etc. If it can happen to professionals, it can and will happen to everyone who risks it. Why? Simple, we are all distractable. Ergo, we handle that fact proactively.

Buy a holster.

RandomFool
July 5, 2007, 03:34 PM
Anyone know if Taurus will take a look at a problem I noticed on my PT145? The slide no longer locks ban on en empty mag? Also, the trigger when pullin in DA mode, doesn't reset on its own. I have to push it forward sometimes.

Darnit! I thought it came out alright.

hankpac
July 5, 2007, 03:50 PM
This is a mistake that could have been prevented. I am wondering what made yoiu think the roof of the car was a god place for your gun. Nothing ever stays up there, even while loading up. the gun goes in a holster, or on the seat, while you are loading. Putting the weapon on top of the car just advertises to anyone that there is a gun.
It makes you look thoughtless and dangerous. Not to the bad guys, to the neighbors!.
Your post even says, you placed the gun on top of the car, THEN went and put another load of wash in the dryer. You turned your back on your own firearm without securing it.
This is a deadly tool. You better put some more thought into your routine. Yes life goes on, but it better not go on like before. This episode calls for some mature thought, and planning.

kbarrett
July 5, 2007, 05:14 PM
Anyone know if Taurus will take a look at a problem I noticed on my PT145? The slide no longer locks ban on en empty mag? Also, the trigger when pullin in DA mode, doesn't reset on its own. I have to push it forward sometimes.

Sounds like a busted return spring ... often pistol designers have them do double duty, as in putting tension on things like the empty mag slide lock mechanism.

If you aren't comfortable doing the work yourself, have a gunsmith find and replace the broken spring.


( I don't put stuff on the roof of my car anymore for similar reasons ... put it on the hood where you can see it if you are about to drive off. My last "crap on the roof" incident only cost me a stack of new CDs .... )

mindwip
July 5, 2007, 05:24 PM
As a general rule I never put anything on my roof, ever.


Glad you found it.

Mr. James
July 5, 2007, 05:25 PM
Happens to the best of us:

Saturday, November 19, 2005

Policeman drives away with weapon on the roof of his car

A Quincy, Mass. police officer lost his department-issued gun apparently after driving away without realizing he had placed the weapon on the roof of his car, officials said.

The officer, Declan Breslin, was reprimanded and placed on desk duty for several days as punishment for losing his weapon, which was picked up by other Quincy police officers who were investigating a car crash last month in the same area the gun was dropped, Police Chief Robert Crowley said.

The incident marks the second time in a month that a local public safety official has lost his handgun, but with drastically different results. Last week, a part-time Plymouth County sheriff’s deputy was fired for a similar mishap after leaving his gun in the restroom of a Pembroke Dunkin’ Donuts.

The deputy, Robert Greek, returned to the doughnut shop less than 45 minutes later, but the weapon was gone. When the gun was recovered, Scituate police revoked Greek’s license to carry a firearm, which prompted the sheriff’s department to fire him.

Not keeping a gun secure is a state crime and is grounds for local police to revoke a gun license.

After speaking to Breslin’s supervisors, Crowley decided to issue him a formal reprimand and place him on restricted duty for a short time.

‘‘We took into account his performance on the job, which has been superb,’’ Crowley said.

Crowley has been sharply criticized by gun owners for a tough policy on issuing gun permits to residents, and one advocate suggested that the punishment given to the Quincy officer shows a ‘‘great double-standard.’’ James Wallace, the executive director of the Gun Owners’ Action League, said the punishment given to Breslin isn’t the problem, saying he’d hate to see a police officer’s career harmed for what was clearly an accident.

‘‘But I’m certain in my heart that if this was one our members, not only would they have lost their license, but they would have been brought up on criminal charges by the chief,’’ Wallace said.

The gun was found less than 30 minutes after it fell from Breslin’s car near the intersection of Franklin and Water streets in Quincy Center, Crowley said.

At first, investigators thought a drunken-driving suspect who fled the scene of the crash may have thrown the gun out the window of the van he was driving. The handgun was found by the alleged victim of the crash, who saw the weapon in the street and kicked it to the side of the curb.

A check of the gun’s serial number showed that it was not reported lost and stolen, and it was quickly traced to Breslin, who was appointed a police officer in 2003. Crowley said Breslin was in the area caring for an ill family member while off-duty and packing his belongings into his car when he left the gun on his car’s roof.

http://ledger.southofboston.com/articles/2005/11/19/news/news04.txt

Same thing happened to a Virginia State Trooper in, I believe, Manassas, Virginia. Stopped to gas up the VSP car, unholstered his weapon to adjust his duty belt, and drove off with the gun on the roof. It slid off outside the gas station and was shortly recovered.

I guess you guys who come down hard on Random have never been in a traffic accident. If so, I guess y'all walk everywhere you go now. After all, you're unfit to drive a car.

Bob, who has littered the roadways with coffee mugs, day-planners, books, and athletic equipment.

Jamie C.
July 5, 2007, 06:23 PM
I'm a pretty tall guy, and the top of a car is perfect shelf height for me. *sigh*, I need to get a truck or van or something.

No sir, you need to work on becoming more conscious/aware of your gun, and what you're doing/have done with it.

Life and the "real world" are gonna present you with all sorts of handy, convenient places to set the thing down, and then throw all sorts of situations at you to make you forget all about it. It's your job to thwart ol' Murphy and not let that stuff get the better of you.

You got lucky this time... extremely so. Count your blessings, learn from it, and move on.


J.C.

kellyj00
July 5, 2007, 06:38 PM
i noticed the OP's progression from concerned fella to "darned gun doesn't work anymore."

Let's take a breath randomfool, and think about what could have been versus what is. You left a gun on top of your car. it fell off on the freeway and didn't injure anyone. Someone honest picked it up and turned it in. The police gave it back and didn't even give you a ticket, but note...you get a ticket if you make a stupid simple traffic mistake and get in a wreck.

Now, you're saying "it doesn't lock back when the magazine is empty" oh no! Holy hell what are you going to do now?! I'm not in your shoes, but I honestly would only be upset if I didn't get the gun back.... at least now you know it isn't going to be used for no good.

If you buy a new car, then take it out and hit a deer while driving home at night because you "don't want to stay in a hotel" then you're out $1000 (deductible) to get your brand new car back up to brand new again. It sucks, but hey, it's life... and that actually did happen to me, and my wife's 1 week old Nissan Sentra. Cost me $934! cash, out of pocket. It hurts, especially when she reminds me "the hotel was only $50"

Anyhow, take it to a gunsmith.... or send it off to taurus and say that they shipped it that way or something, you may get a laugh (and so will they). I did the same thing with the car, took it back to the dealer "didn't see this at first, I think you should fix it." fella just looked at it and scratched his chin "I can't believe I didn't see that!" deer hit us in the side.... no big deal, car handles really well, even when doing a 180. "it was a dealer trade! those jerks, they owe us a new car! we'll get this worked out" "dude, we hit a deer!" "oh, my gosh! you had me going...."

Just look at the bright side, at least you've got a conversation piece now....and one heck of a 'don't do this story'.... which reminds me of the time I left my lunch on the top of my car when I was a teenager.... folks kept honking and yelling at me before I figured it out. Still funny to me.

Jamie C.
July 5, 2007, 06:43 PM
Bob, who has littered the roadways with coffee mugs, day-planners, books, and athletic equipment.

Um, Bob? None of those things have near as much potential to ruin your life or someone else's if take a "worst case" sort of direction.

Comparing books, day planners, etc. to a firearm goes way past "apples and oranges".

I'm well aware that people new to carrying a gun have a "break-in" period where they have to get used to having the thing there, and keeping up with it... and also the old saying "Familiarity breeds contempt", which is what usually hangs us "old timers" out to dry.

I guess my point here is that people are making a big mistake ( and usually get caught by it ) when they treat a gun the same as any of the numerous, more mundane objects that we all leave strewn about the landscape as we go about our daily business.

As for the question "haven't you ever done anything stupid?"... Of course I have. Got the 2 ex-wives to prove it. However, I had a father, grandfather, and later on, Drill Instructors, that pretty much made sure I'd never do too much "stupid" with a gun. ;)


J.C.

physics
July 5, 2007, 09:42 PM
I too am aware of my guns always. I do not ever want a situation like this or like any other to happen to me, so I am always paying attention to my weapon. ALWAYS. If you are carrying a weapon, you should be too, because by not paying attention, you can make the world less safe, rather than more.

However, I think that this can be chalked up as an "OH %#@&" moment, and we can all learn a little from this. I know I've learned a lesson here, and I'm willing to bet the OP did too. It's just a damn good thing that nobody got hurt, no quickie-marts got robbed, and the gun came back. LUCKY though.

bogie
July 5, 2007, 10:04 PM
Enough already.

Bonehead maneuver acknowledged, and with a decent outcome, for once.

If the thing isn't 100%, send it to a smith, with instruction to make it mechanically sound, but not to worry about cosmetics. You now own a gun you are not worried about scratching.

Jeff
July 5, 2007, 10:19 PM
Some thoughts:

1. Bob made a very good point. One I was also thinking. Most of us, who have been driving every day for many many years, will eventually make a mistake while driving. It could be a mistake that is either fatal or near-fatal. Our we unfit to drive cars?

2. RandomFool, hang that Taurus of yours above the mantle (or on the wall behind the TV). Make it a visible fixture of your living space, so you see it every day.

3. Drive a convertible. :)

Bilt4Comfort
July 5, 2007, 10:27 PM
but not to worry about cosmetics. You now own a gun you are not worried about scratching.

LMFAO!
Really though...it's a Taurus autoloader, it couldn't possibly be any worse now than out of the box new a week earlier. Put it on the shelf for good and go out and spend $150-$200 more than you did on the PT145 and get a pistol that you won't have to take advantage of the "lifetime warranty", sending it in monthly for repairs. (Taurus bashing rant complete)

Seriously though, there is a God and you should be thanking him endlessly that this didn't turn out different than it did.

kd7nqb
July 5, 2007, 11:09 PM
1. You made a BAD mistake but learned from it
2. You got REALLY lucky that it was turned in
3. Breath deep

bsf
July 6, 2007, 12:33 AM
This is an example of why I try not to set stuff on my vehicles. If I need to set something down, I try to set it in the vehicle. Coolers, eggs, milk, flashlights, book bags, cell phones; I have seen all of them riding on vehicles or on the road because someone forgot to pull them off before driving away.

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