Deer w/Laser


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Logos
June 28, 2007, 09:59 AM
Anybody here have any experience or heard anything about hunting deer with a handgun equipped with laser sights?

I assume in very cold weather you would have to keep the gun inside your coat until use because of the batteries, but I can't think of any other problems specific to this sighting system.

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DogBonz
June 28, 2007, 10:06 AM
it is illegal to use a laser for hunting.

jmorris
June 28, 2007, 10:19 AM
Do they work, yes. Are they practical, no.

Logos
June 28, 2007, 11:15 AM
Can you give a little more detail as to why they're not practical?

wolf_from_wv
June 28, 2007, 11:54 AM
In West Virginia:
- you can hunt with a handgun larger than .357 or bottleneck over .24
- you cannot use laser sights
- handgun MUST be worn outside of any clothes/coats
- you can CCW if you have a permit

You would probably have to wear it unconcealed. If it is legal to hunt with, maybe you could sew a pouch on the outside of the holster and put a handwarmer in it... Can you see the laser dot on a deer?

ArmedBear
June 28, 2007, 01:27 PM
It's also illegal in California. I'd guess our laws are somewhat typical. If anything, most states seem to have much stricter limits on hunting equipment.

Note that here you are allowed to hunt deer, pigs, even bear with ANY centerfire handgun, even a .32 S&W snubbie, as long as you don't use FMJ bullets. For elk, you must have at least a 4" barrel on your handgun, but ANY centerfire caliber is legal.

You can legally hunt elk with a .22 Hornet. AFAIK there's no magazine size limit for hunting big game with a semiauto rifle or carbine, either. This doesn't mean it's particularly wise to hunt bear with a .32 caliber snubbie, or ethical to hunt elk with a .22 Hornet. In fact, it's downright WRONG to do either. But there's no law against it:p

Bottom line, our regulations are FAR more lax than many states.

Still, laser sights are banned for big game hunting, to wit:

(h) Except as otherwise provided, while taking or attempting to take big game under the provisions of Section 353 or Section 354, Title 14, CCR, it is unlawful to use any device or devices which: 1) throw, cast or project an artificial light or electronically alter or intensify a light source for the purpose of visibly enhancing an animal; or 2) throw, cast or project an artificial light or electronically alter or intensify a light source for the purpose of providing a visible point of aim directly on an animal. Devices commonly referred to as "sniperscopes", night vision scopes or binoculars, or those utilizing infra-red, heat sensing or other non-visible spectrum light technology used for the purpose of visibly enhancing an animal or providing a visible point of aim directly on an animal are prohibited and may not be possessed while taking or attempting to take big game. Devices commonly referred to as laser rangefinders, "red-dot" scopes with self-illuminating reticles, and fiberoptic sights with self illuminating sight or pins which do not throw, cast or project a visible light onto an animal are permitted.

NRA4LIFE
June 28, 2007, 02:14 PM
I would be surprised if it is legal anywhere.

Logos
June 28, 2007, 03:13 PM
Be surprised.

It's legal in MN.

I don't see why it would be made illegal. It doesn't offer any unfair advantage.

USMC - Retired
June 28, 2007, 03:15 PM
I'n most places the laws that prohibit "spotlighting" also cover lasers because what your are doing is shining a light on the animal. Most states laws don't differentiate between a laser light and any other form.

RubenZ
June 28, 2007, 03:23 PM
How about learn to aim :) instead of taking an easy way out.

Logos
June 28, 2007, 03:48 PM
Well, I can aim ok.....it's just that when you get older your sight picture is not as crystal clear as when you were younger.

The laser puts older folks back on an even playing field with the younger eyes.

It's better for the deer, too. The more precision you have, the better off you are.

ArmedBear
June 28, 2007, 03:55 PM
I don't see why it would be made illegal. It doesn't offer any unfair advantage.

If it offered no advantage, then why would anyone buy one?

"Unfair" is an arbitrary, though not invalid, judgment call, just like hunting seasons. It's a balancing act to conserve the deer population while harvesting deer from it.

Jackrabbits here are open season all year and no limits. If we had as many deer...:)

Logos
June 28, 2007, 05:10 PM
Now here......we have very few jackrabbits and huge numbers of deer.

Go figure.

Anyhow, it hasn't been addressed in MN law and I doubt if it will be. We're more laid-back than some states.

I was hoping to hear from somebody who had experience using a laser sight when hunting.....guess it's too new and also illegal in some places.

plexreticle
June 28, 2007, 05:15 PM
I'm curious how well a laser would reflect off a deer's shoulder. Could you even see it at any distance?

RubenZ
June 28, 2007, 05:16 PM
Good point. When I play around with laser points on my cats you really can't see it well on them. The Fur breaks it up too much.

Logos
June 28, 2007, 06:43 PM
Well, deer (at least big ones) are usually shot at dawn or dusk. The CTCs are powerful lasers and I suspect it will show up well under those conditions. I will have 50 yards as a limit anyway.

trueg50
June 29, 2007, 09:04 AM
If aiming is that bad then get a reflex sight, or a scope for your handgun. Personally I wouldn't hunt using either, but what ever floats you boat and doesn't get you sunk by the local game warden.

jmorris
June 29, 2007, 09:45 AM
IMO not practical: I set my father up with a .22 rifle using CB caps to dispatch rabbits eating my moms flowers. It is equipped with a laser, light and a 1.5-4X scope (to cover all of the bases). While the laser does work it is slowest method to use for sighting, and that’s at night. During day light hours it takes even longer, especially at longer ranges, to acquire the “dot”, then drive it around to the target. You would have much better luck with an Aimpoint or a Cmore, if you need a dot to look at.

Yosemite**Sam
July 2, 2007, 05:08 PM
I'll agree with JMORRIS. I personally like the EOTECH and it is much more parctical.

Guncrazy45
July 2, 2007, 06:47 PM
I'n most places the laws that prohibit "spotlighting" also cover lasers because what your are doing is shining a light on the animal. Most states laws don't differentiate between a laser light and any other form.

Hmm...what about an IR laser?

If a laser targets a deer in the forest, but there's nobody who can see it, does it make a light?

***EDIT***

Oops, it looks like ArmedBear has that covered...

Alphazulu6
July 2, 2007, 07:04 PM
Lasers are determined "unsportsman-like" in many fish and game restricted areas. It does offer a great advantage just like they are not allowed in competition shooting sports (well most sanctioned matches).

I just use it on my glock for my home defense firearm though for some reason alot of people think that they are worthless on any firearm. I obviously would have to disagree! It takes practice but like point shooting, positive feedback on the target with a blinking light always helps :D

I do however do use a scope to hunt with :D

Titan6
July 2, 2007, 08:59 PM
Hmm...what about an IR laser?

If a laser targets a deer in the forest, but there's nobody who can see it, does it make a light?

Please post where such an item is available for sale to the public.

ShootinDave
July 2, 2007, 09:36 PM
Unless the need to "ninja hunt" a deer is too great, I would point to a quality red dot and pretend it is projecting a scary beem onto the unsuspecting doe.

Logos
July 3, 2007, 08:40 AM
While cheap lasers may indeed be hard to use, the Crimson Trace is about as practical as a sighting system can be. Target acquisition is very fast and easy with the bright dot on this sight.

I think there may be a lot of confusion over lasers as they are still new to most people......and those who set hunting regs may also see new technology as threatening or too "different"......and with some enforcement people--anything new is bad and should be illegal.

But.....that will soon change, I think.

I have to laugh when I compare this to how some old hunters said scopes were impractical back in the fifties.

hounddog
July 5, 2007, 05:19 AM
If it had been legal....I guess I could have used a lasermax integral laser on a Glock 22 to shoot a deer at 15 yards. :evil: In low light situations, dusk, dawn, the laser shows up very well on a deers shoulder. Deer, in my experience, do not pay any attention what so ever to that little red dot. Some state recently legalized lasers for blind hunters, so hunting guide could help them place their shot.

RubenZ
July 5, 2007, 09:44 AM
One reason why I don't use lasers is because they show you how much you shake while holding a pistol :) It would just upset me. I'd concentrate more on holding the dot steady than what I was doing.

Logos
July 5, 2007, 11:20 AM
That threw me at first, too.

But if you handle it the same way you do with regular sights......meaning just increase pressure on the trigger as your dot heads for the perfect spot......and decrease pressure when it heads away--everything works out fine.

Better, actually.....since you can more clearly see exactly what you're doing.

You end up with tighter groups because of that knowledge of how the pistol shakes.

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