Slugs through a full choke?


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Regolith
July 8, 2007, 12:41 AM
Somewhere I read that shootings lugs through anything more than an improved cylinder is potentially dangerous. Not sure if its true. Anyway, a day or two ago I learned from my dad that he had shot slugs for years through his Winchester model 12 12 gauge shotgun that happened to have a fixed full choke. I'm just wondering what are the possible consequences of this (if any). At this point I have a sneaking suspicion that his shotgun is no longer a full choke.

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hoghunting
July 8, 2007, 01:27 AM
If he is shooting lead slugs, his barrel is fine, although it probably has a lead build up at the choke. I worked on a buddy's shotgun that has used many slugs through his fixed full choke and leading was the only problem - aside from the fact that it wasn't that accurate.

pdowg881
July 8, 2007, 01:29 AM
I've only done it through modified, and was told by the dealer who sold me the gun at Kittery trading post (rem870) to never fire slugs through a full choke. I guess I'll have to see if the manual makes any mention of it.

Regolith
July 8, 2007, 01:34 AM
Hog: Don't know what kind of slugs he used. This would probably have been in the 1960's or 1970's. I do know that whatever he did to it, it didn't effect the accuracy; I can knock birds out of the air with it extremely well (which is why I was wondering if the slugs might not have opened it up a bit, creating a wider spread).

He also mentioned that at one point his front site was loose, which may or may not have anything to do with shooting the slugs through it.

rantingredneck
July 8, 2007, 01:43 AM
I've shot .410 foster type slugs through a fully choked H&R before. No problem other than not terribly accurate past 25 yds. Most lead slug ammo boxes say something to the effect that they can be fired through any choke, but IC gives best results.

Jack2427
July 8, 2007, 04:55 AM
For 40+ years in military, LE and contract training/security, the shotgun has been one of my standbys. I have probably fired a carload of various slugs and buckshot. Here is how it works with the "rifled" slug: It is a very nose heavy projectile with a hollow base or skirt. Being nose heavy keeps it straight, sort of. Since it has the hollow skirt, it swages down when it goes out the barrel end, a "rifled" slug can be fired out of any barrel of that gauge, including "extra full" and turkey chokes-with absolutely no damage or danger. Think about it, would major ammo makers sell a shell that could damage a barrel or be dangerous if fired in the proper gauge barrel?
In any case you can shoot them in any choke. Now how about sabot slugs? They are made substantially undersize for a specific sized rifled bore, you can shoot them in any choke also, probably a large waste of cash as they will probably be wildly inaccurate. BUt not dangerous. The sabot is plastic and will swage down easier than lead, the actual slug is usually 50 caliber, much smaller than the bore.
A large number of Ithaca police/military shotguns were specifically full choked and shot slugs very nicely.
So, full choke, no problem! Do not listen to idiot sales persons, and others who are simply ignorant. If shooting slugs in full chokes was the least dangerous, I would not be writing this.

Zoogster
July 8, 2007, 06:23 AM
It can be dangerous depending on the shotgun's strength and more importantly the slug used.

Most foster slugs used soft lead that swagers down out of any choke, of course creating higher pressures internaly to do it from more constricting chokes. Sabots are undersized and the projectile is smaller than the bore already so also as previously mentioned not likely a danger to the operator.

However FOSTER, or the most common rifled slugs are hollow at the base, giving a lot of leeway because there is quite a bit of extra space to push that soft lead into in addition to being soft lead.
Now hardened lead slugs, or jacketed full sized slugs, or slugs made from a metal harder than lead could be seriously dangerous as they will not swager to size as easily, and in some cases not at all.
I would not use most brenneke style slugs (which are far superior) in such a bore for this reason. They do not have that hollow space to allow them to deform easier, and some are hardened for increased penetration.

Do not listen to idiot sales persons, and others who are simply ignorant. If shooting slugs in full chokes was the least dangerous, I would not be writing this.
The people that recomend against shooting slugs through them are far from ignorant, it is a very real danger, but much more so with slug variations that are not as common. So it may be merely luck that the most common slugs are the least dangerous to do so with that has kept some people from a very bad experience or damage to thier firearm.

rantingredneck
July 8, 2007, 09:42 AM
One other caution is to not fire any slug through an overbored barrel like on a mossberg 835 (standard accumag barrel). They are overbored to nearly 10 ga. dimensions and a 12 ga. slug can wobble as it goes down the barrel and wedge sideways causing potential kaboom problem, especially if a second round were fired without the operator realizing the barrel is obstructed.

Those barrels will say "Not for use with slugs" on the side though, and there are designated slug barrels for those guns.

trueblue1776
July 8, 2007, 09:52 AM
I wouldn't shoot a slug through a skeet barrel, pretty sure it would still come out the right end of the gun. Also sure I couldn't bust clays very well after I did that a few times. Your results may vary.

I agree that you would be a crack smoker to shoot a slug through an 835 overbore barrel, pretty sure I know how that would go.

hoghunting
July 8, 2007, 05:08 PM
Hog: Don't know what kind of slugs he used. This would probably have been in the 1960's or 1970's. I do know that whatever he did to it, it didn't effect the accuracy; I can knock birds out of the air with it extremely well (which is why I was wondering if the slugs might not have opened it up a bit, creating a wider spread).


Reg,

I was referring to the accuracy shooting slugs. Soft lead slugs used during the '60s and '70s won't hurt your barrel.

Jeff F
July 8, 2007, 10:08 PM
I used to have an old Remington 878 auto master with a 30 in fixed full choke barrel that I shot lots of slugs out of. Lots of buckshot to. It never hurt the shotgun.

warriorsociologist
September 16, 2007, 09:53 PM
I understand this post is a little old - but I want to revive it to ask if anyone here has any general experience with the performance differences between Foster-style and Brenneke-style slugs in fixed-FULL 20ga. barrels.

I have such a barrel on a 20" single-shot that I often have riding in my boat. It's uaully loaded with #6 or #8, but I've wondered about keeping a few slugs on hand for if/when I might need some bigger medicine. I gather it will be safe to fire them and I expect that the Fosters will be more accurate (given the swaging theory)....but, I generally prefer shooting Brennekes in my 12ga.

What say you folks?

mgregg85
September 17, 2007, 09:31 PM
Every gun's barrel is different, full choke on one gun(fixed chokes or screw in) may be very different from full choke on another gun. I can't remember where I read this but it was in a recent magazine article, i'll see if I can find it.

Whitman31
September 18, 2007, 12:17 AM
I started out hunting dear with an 20ga, full fixed choke gun, shooting both remington sluggers and Brennek's. Never had an issue, kicked like hell though...

zinj
September 18, 2007, 12:55 AM
Now hardened lead slugs, or jacketed full sized slugs, or slugs made from a metal harder than lead could be seriously dangerous as they will not swager to size as easily, and in some cases not at all.


These are rarer than Hen's Teeth, though. The only outfit I can think of who are making such loads is Dixie Slugs.

I would not use most brenneke style slugs (which are far superior) in such a bore for this reason. They do not have that hollow space to allow them to deform easier, and some are hardened for increased penetration.

If you take a look at a Brenneke slug you will see that it has ribs molded into the side so it can pass through any reasonable choke. A Brenneke slug is not made to bore diameter, rather the attached wad provides the seal against the burning powder.

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