Cleaning Revolver Cylinder


PDA






bountyhunter
June 28, 2003, 11:27 PM
Need to know if there is a way to get the burn glazed ring out of the cylinder on a magnum (at the end of the brass). I am shooting UMC ammo and it has left a burn ring from the planet Krypton.

Is that Blue Wonder gel good for softening up that burned stuff?

Anything else you can apply to it to soften it up?

I am trying to get any alternative to the usual arm scrubbing with bronze brushes.

If you enjoyed reading about "Cleaning Revolver Cylinder" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
B27
June 28, 2003, 11:30 PM
What I do occasionally is to stuff the chambers with cotton balls and then soak that cotton with Kroil www.brownells.com
Leave it overnight and the next day clean with a bronze brush as usual.
The Kroil will penetrate the carbon, somewhat, overnight and soften it.

swifter
June 29, 2003, 03:20 PM
I'm currently trying "Wipe-Out" bore cleaner in my rifles, and I'm impressed.
I'td be a trick to get into revolver chambers, but I bet it'd work for that.
I probably need to go get a revolver dirty...:D

Tom

Cawdor
June 29, 2003, 05:37 PM
While I like Blue Wonder, it did no better or worse than any of the other cleaners I have tried to clean the ring that you described.

Arub
June 29, 2003, 09:59 PM
KleenBore, or Hoppes, or someone has a 'turbo scrubber' on the market. I threw out the bubble pack and don't recall who makes it or what they call it. It appears to be a sprial of wire mesh rather than a conventional brush. Works wonders on the cylinder chambers.

dfariswheel
June 29, 2003, 10:33 PM
From a post on another forum:

I use bronze chamber cleaning brushes from Brownell's. These are special extra stiff, over-sized brushes used ONLY for chamber cleaning.
Although they also sell stainless versions, these are used only by gunsmith's for badly abused guns. These will wear and possibly damage chambers, so no stainless.

GrandmasterB
June 30, 2003, 12:42 PM
Chuck your cleaning rod with bristle brush into your cordless drill and run it through the cylinder on low speed. This really helps break up the crud.

larryw
June 30, 2003, 01:25 PM
What GrandmasterB said. Old shotgun bore brushes work great.

bountyhunter
June 30, 2003, 05:53 PM
Chuck your cleaning rod with bristle brush into your cordless drill and run it through the cylinder on low speed. This really helps break up the crud.

I ended up having to chuck up a bronze bore brush on a short rod and spin it for a couple of minutes. The stuff didn't break off, it sort of hined down. And it lefet a dark spot on the tube wall where it was. Wierd. It's like it was some kind of hardened barbon that fused to the cylinder wall.

It just seems like with all the time spent fighting it over the years, somebody would have invented some thing you could rub on to loosen it off.

larryw
June 30, 2003, 09:56 PM
Take the cylinder apart and soak the dirty end in Acetone for a couple hours. Then try the brush in the drill trick again. Repeat until nice and clean.

Acetone will remove all oil; make sure to properly oil everything once you're done.

mainmech48
July 4, 2003, 02:55 AM
Try some J-B on a tight-fitting patch. Iosso makes a paste bore cleaner that does a nice job, too. Works for me.

Zeke Menuar
July 4, 2003, 10:38 AM
I soak the cylinder in Break Free for a day or two, then use an oversize bronze bore brush and the crud usually comes right out with minumum effort. As mentioned earlier by another poster, I have polished the inside of the cylinders with JB's bore paste. The polishing seems to make it harder for the creepin' crud to stick to the cylinder.

ZM

bpisler
July 4, 2003, 10:40 AM
On my stainless guns i use some automotive rubbing compound on a bore brush followed by a patch with solvent.On the cylinder face a patch with some rubbing compound works well i've only used this on stainless not blued.

Captain Bligh
July 4, 2003, 10:52 AM
These are all good tips. Perhaps it goes without saying, but it's a lot eaier if you never let the ring build up in the first place. I find that the best long-term solution is to make cleaning your cylinders a part of your cleaning ritual every time you clean your revolver. and to clean your gun after every time you shoot it. It will still involve work but much less than allowing crud to accumulate over time.

RJ

If you enjoyed reading about "Cleaning Revolver Cylinder" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!