Building an AR-15


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SKSgunnut101
July 21, 2007, 07:44 PM
I'm thinking of buying A DS-4 A2 barreled upper from J&T. I have some questions.
-If I bought a assembled complete American spirt lower (Trigger, housing and disconnecter, stock etc) would there be anything that would require a machine shop or gun smith to put togther?
- Should I pay the extra money and get chrome lining (I don't care about the decrease in accuracy) and better handguards
-Should I get a 1-7 or 1-9 twist in the barrel

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epi 1:10,000
July 21, 2007, 07:51 PM
1. I would certainly hope not
2. chrome is worth it
3. 1-9 will due for bullets up to 70 grains, 1-7 for bullets 71 grains and up

SKSgunnut101
July 21, 2007, 07:52 PM
Does J&T have a good reputation?

Chris Rhines
July 21, 2007, 08:07 PM
No.
Yes.
If you plan on using very light varmint rounds, 1:9" or slower. If you plan on using heavier OTM rounds, 1:8" or 1:7". I prefer the 1:7", as the lightest bullets I ever shoot are 55 grain.
My experiences with J&T have been pretty good. They're not top of the line, but the J&T upper I have has survived several thousand rounds, including one three-day carbine class.

- Chris

RockyMtnTactical
July 21, 2007, 09:44 PM
Go chrome or go home. :D

I prefer 1/9. It depends on the ammo you choose to shoot for the most part. If you are gonna be shooting M856 tracers and 80gr bullets, get a 1/7. If you are gonna shoot 45-77gr ammo, get a 1/9.

Frog48
July 21, 2007, 09:59 PM
would there be anything that would require a machine shop or gun smith to put togther?


If there is, there is a serious problem. :neener:

Onmilo
July 21, 2007, 10:31 PM
In my area 50-62 grain loads are common and available everywhere.
Try finding loaded 77 grain Match loads and you will come up empty handed.
1 in 9 twist is the way to go.

There is nothing wrong with chrome lining unless you plan on shooting Competition Matches at ranges longer than 300 meters.

You are not really building a rifle, you are assembling a rifle from component parts.
If it doesn't go together without the help of a gunsmith I would have issues with the vendors involved.

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