Three Killed in Connecticut Home Invasion


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raubritter
July 23, 2007, 05:31 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,290460,00.html

There was a horrible home invassion in my area a couple of years ago. The whole family was killed including 2 little girls. The criminals had done a few more before where they set the house on fire after the killings.

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JaxNovice
July 23, 2007, 05:35 PM
That is horrible.

There have also been a string of home invasions in Greenwich,CT. It shows no matter how safe you think your neighborhood is, trouble can always find you.

30 cal slob
July 23, 2007, 05:41 PM
:fire:


courant.com/news/custom/topnews/hcu-chehomeinvade-0723,0,2988507.story?coll=hc_tab01_layout

Courant.com
Mother, Two Daughters Killed In Cheshire Home Invasion

BY COLIN POITRAS, DAVE ALTIMARI, HILDA MUÑOZ, MATTHEW KAUFFMAN and MARY ELLEN FILLO

Courant Staff Writers

5:36 PM EDT, July 23, 2007

CHESHIRE

A mother and her two daughters were killed during a home invasion Monday morning that ended with the arrest of two suspects who rammed several police cars as they tried to escape, authorities said.

A fourth family member -- the woman's husband and the father of the girls -- was badly beaten in the hours-long invasion. He was in serious but stable condition at St. Mary's Hospital in Waterbury.

Sources identified the victims as Jennifer Hawke-Petit, a nurse at Cheshire Academy; William A. Petit Jr., a doctor at New Britain General Hospital; and their two daughters, Hayley and Michaela. "This is a very sad day for us. This is a horrible tragedy," a somber Michael Milone, Cheshire's town manager, said at an afternoon press conference.

Cheshire police Lt. Jay Markella said the invasion started in the early morning -- perhaps 3 a.m. At around 9 a.m., one of the suspects forced Hawke-Petit to drive to a local Bank of America branch and withdraw money, while the other assailant remained in the home with the rest of the family, sources said. Hawke-Petit was able to alert a bank employee that her family was being held hostage.

Bank employees contacted Cheshire police, and an officer dispatched to the home at 300 Sorghum Mill Drive found the house in flames, state police said. Two suspects then attempted to flee in a car and crashed into the officer's cruiser. Two other Cheshire officers set up a roadblock a short distance away and the suspects rammed those police cars as well. The suspects were then taken into custody, state police said. No officers were injured.

Police have not released the names of the two men in custody.

A source said William Petit had been badly beaten around the head, and stumbled out of the house while it was burning. He was able to make it to a neighbor's home to seek help. The other family members were found dead in the home. The cause of their deaths is unclear. The office of the chief state medical examiner plans to perform autopsies Tuesday.

Jennifer Hawke-Petit, 48, was a nurse at the Richmond Health Center at Cheshire Academy. She had previously been a nurse at Yale-New Haven Hospital and was a Penn State graduate. She also has been involved with the Girl Scouts and Habitat for Humanity.

William Petit, 50, a prominent endocrinologist, is the medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center Affiliate at The Hospital of Central Connecticut, and president of the Hartford County Medical Association. He is a past president of the state chapter of the American Diabetes Association and was elected to the ADA Hall of Merit in 1994.

Hayley, 17, graduated in June from Miss Porter's School, where she was co-editor in chief of Chautauqua, the school's "journal of scholarly writing." She also was co-captain of the crew team and a member of the cross country and basketball teams. She was set to attend Dartmouth College, her father's alma mater, and planned to study medicine.

Jennifer Hawke-Petit was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis eight years ago, when Hayley was in fourth grade. The family became active in the Connecticut chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society, and Hayley, inspired by an aunt's efforts to raise money for MS in North Carolina, formed a fundraising team called "Hayley's Hope."

Over the past eight years she raised more than $54,000, and was honored at Miss Porter's this spring by Women Against MS, a grassroots advocacy group.

Her younger sister Michaela was going to take over Hayley's legacy, and "add Michaela's Miracle to Hayley's Hope," according the school's website.

Burch Ford, head of school at Miss Porter's, called Hayley a wonderful human being, loved by her classmates and respected by everyone.

"She was a leader in every way, both publicly and privately," Ford said.

One of 81 young women in Miss Porter's Class of 2007, Hayley was very service oriented, very thoughtful, not someone who drew attention to herself, Ford said. Both parents were active supporters of the school and regulars at parent events and on the sidelines at their daughter's games and regattas.

"This would be terrible for anybody, but this is going to hit the community so hard," Ford said. "Even more so because the family was such a presence."

Bill Gavin, a neighbor of the Petits, said he heard firetrucks roaring down the street and saw the back of the house in flames. He said a firefighter used a ladder to climb to a 2nd floor window, but quickly retreated. He said all of the firefighters then got behind the firetruck and SWAT team members moved in.

Jennifer Ferraiolo at 290 Sorghum Mill Drive said she spoke to William Petit Jr. at 7:30 Sunday night and he appeared fine. "They are the nicest people," she said. "Obviously they were targeted. It's very hard to understand."

rhubarb
July 23, 2007, 05:47 PM
I was reading corneredcat.com the other day in preparation for my wife's first range outing.

Pax points out in one article that there are worse things than dying fighting for your family.

raubritter
July 23, 2007, 05:49 PM
This is why I have weapons capable of effectively stopping multiple gobblins.

Dannavyret
July 23, 2007, 07:39 PM
This is why we chose the location of our retirement home, the layout of the yard, the locks on the doors and windows, our weapons and roll playing every possible situation and reaction.

Paranoid? To some yes but we will never end up like these poor people did.

SomeKid
July 23, 2007, 07:42 PM
Hope that state has the death penalty. Even under Tennessee's hard to reach DP laws, this would qualify.

$5 the women got raped before they were murdered. I hope I lose that bet.

Cosmoline
July 23, 2007, 08:04 PM
Stuff like this happens all the time. The only unusual element was the victims were upper crust and well known in the community.

Bazooka Joe71
July 23, 2007, 08:18 PM
I feel like I'm going to vomit.

I they did exactly the opposite of what William would have wanted...Killed his family and left him alive(well the opp of what I would have wanted).

This just makes me sick.:fire:

My thoughts and prayers go out to William.:(

Standing Wolf
July 23, 2007, 09:44 PM
I don't ever answer the door without dropping a pint-sized .357 magnum revolver in a trousers pocket.

bensdad
July 23, 2007, 10:26 PM
This is so horrible. Special place in Hell for these two. When I hear or read these articles I want to kill the perps myself. Is that bad?

I don't ever answer the door without dropping a pint-sized .357 magnum revolver in a trousers pocket.

After dark, and before 8:00am, I answer the door with gun-in-hand. May not be polite, but that's how it is.

stevelyn
July 23, 2007, 11:29 PM
Pax points out in one article that there are worse things than dying for your family.

Yeah......Like surviving and living with the fact they died because you were unprepared or too stupid to defend them.:uhoh:

Doctor Suarez
July 24, 2007, 01:54 AM
In the most recent Vanity Fair (the one with Shia LeBouf on the cover) there is an article about a female Manhattan socialite whose house in Kent, Connecticut was invaded by a three-man crew carrying firearms and aluminum cases. (I confess I didn't read the rest of the article as I was on my way to a Mets game.) The victim's name is Anne Bass, and you can find other articles about the incident online.

I think places like Greenwich Conn., more than just being as susceptible to crime as any other place, are actually being targeted aggressively. These are HUGE houses with tons of privacy, which can quickly turn against its residents once an intruder sets up shop. Furthermore, I'd say the smart money bets that none of these people take security seriously, or even own guns let alone answer the door with them.

Fortunately, the victim in this case survived intact, and apparently the authorities believe it to be an inside job (unless they're just saying that to avoid a panic.)

If you're going to seclude yourself away on acres of property, be prepared to live your life in a really upscale blind alleyway, because once you're tucked away like that, nobody's going to see what's happening to you. Personally, the only attraction offered by that kind of seclusion is the chance to go about my life armed and ready, rather than disarmed by the state and nattered by the ignorance of people who don't understand.

Ithaca37
July 24, 2007, 07:21 AM
hours-long invasion

Hours long...I wonder if there is more to this story (like maybe he had a connection to the home invaders). Most home invasions don't last for hours. And killing the family but leaving him alive sounds very mob-like.

Regardless of why they did it, why can't people just steal stuff? Why must they always be killing other people?

Like surviving and living with the fact they died because you were unprepared or too stupid to defend them.

Not only is that comment just wrong in the context, it is also very presumptuous. He may have not even had time to do anything about it. Stuff happens fast in a violent encounter, home invasions especially.

rdaines
July 24, 2007, 07:37 AM
Quote:
Like surviving and living with the fact they died because you were unprepared or too stupid to defend them.

Not only is that comment just wrong in the context, it is also very presumptuous. He may have not even had time to do anything about it. Stuff happens fast in a violent encounter, home invasions especially.

Maybe true but CT (IMHO) is a very gun unfriendly state and people living in the 'burbs will certainly not be home defense savvy. They have been trained to believe that 911 is the answer to home defense. CT does have boonies and attitudes are different there.

30 cal slob
July 24, 2007, 07:43 AM
a gun isn't a magic talisman against evildoers such as these, but it just kills me that CT is probably the BEST RKBA state in NY/NJ/CT tri-state area (everything is relative) and these folks probably didn't avail themselves of the means to protect themselves.

no alarm system in the house?

i understand cheshire is an exclusive suburb of new haven. this is a real wakeup call for the folks who think that living in a nice neighborhood will insulate them from violent crime.

i am a former greenwich, ct resident. all the really nice homes are well north of the police station (which is downtown) - and the cops have to slog through winding local roads to get to them. many of these folk can afford and employ private security. i'm sure some don't. lord help them if they can't protect themselves when seconds count and the cops are minutes away.

i just took an extra pistol out of the safe and several magazines for the missus. she knows where it is and how to use it. but a little more practice is in order.

Ithaca37
July 24, 2007, 08:02 AM
a gun isn't a magic talisman against evildoers such as these
Right, also a gunshot wound may not incapacitate immediately, and considering there were multiple accomplices, it is unlikely you would be successful unless the were scared off, which is probable. This is not to say that you shouldn't try just because the odds may not be in your favor, I am just saying there is a lot more uncertainty in a situation such as this than many are acknowledging. And I think the character bashing of the guy who was beaten is just out of line. You weren't there, therefore you aren't qualified to comment on what did/didn't do to protect his family.

ZMP_CTR
July 24, 2007, 08:13 AM
Dog
Security System
Firearm

.....................i sleep better at night since the security system went in.

ravencon
July 24, 2007, 08:56 AM
Maybe true but CT (IMHO) is a very gun unfriendly state and people living in the 'burbs will certainly not be home defense savvy. They have been trained to believe that 911 is the answer to home defense. CT does have boonies and attitudes are different there.

Connecticut does have some senseless and quirky gun laws but it is a "shall issue" state and obtaining a cc permit is not difficult. The anti-self defense mindset is hardly unique to any geographic area--it is inculcated by the media, the government schools and the clever clueless.

Dannavyret
July 24, 2007, 08:59 AM
The whole northeast is anti-gun, which is why they are now swamped with illegals and rapidly losing long time residents to the Western states.

romma
July 24, 2007, 09:00 AM
Our house is in the woods here in CT... If a criminal is playing e-ne-me-ne-mi-ne-mo around my neck of the woods,,, They will wish they didn't...

This is a sad story all the way around.

kellyj00
July 24, 2007, 09:03 AM
haven't had a feeling like this in my stomach since the virginia tech incident.

Arm every non-criminal man and woman in this country and we'll stop the violence. They had it right over 200 years ago.

scubie02
July 24, 2007, 09:18 AM
The whole northeast is anti-gun, which is why they are now swamped with illegals and rapidly losing long time residents to the Western states.

well, you have to qualify statements like that, since it is somewhat misleading and inaccurate. I live in NY, for instance. Downstate/NYC IS pretty antigun, as are some of the other smaller cities. But upstate in general in NY has been pretty conservative and rural traditionally, though of course the cancer is always spreading. When I was a kid, seeing pickup trucks with rifles in the gunrack in the rear window was a common sight, and not doubt they were often left unlocked with the keys in the ignition--it was that kind of place. Our school had a rifle team, with the range at the elementary school. You could bring your own gun to shoot if you wanted--leave it in the office, ride the school bus up to the elementary school and walk through to the range--imagine that today? The coach'd even give you 22 ammo to practice with at home. The first day of deer season teachers didn't do anything important if they had high school kids because 80% of the guys would be out hunting.

It's a neverending battle to keep the city laws from spreading upstate, but it's still much better upstate than downstate. Those folks spread like a plague, though, and it probably WILL be a losing cause eventually. But once upon a time...

Upstate is still better in some areas anyway than given credit. We have lifetime full carry permits, for instance--many supposedly "friendly" western states and such have to renew theirs every couple of years.

SSN Vet
July 24, 2007, 09:19 AM
and the perpetrators will get.........

3 hots and a cot, the best health care money can buy, free education and all the legal resources they can consume for the rest of there life.

Now tell me, just where is the deterant in this ill-conceived, upside down, farce of a system we have the audacity to call "justice".

----------------------------

The Rev. Ronald A. Rising, a neighbor, said he has known the family for more than 10 years.

"They're just a lovely family," he said. "It's just awful to think it would happen to a family like that in this community. You don't think about those things happening."

The upper-middle class neighborhood includes colonial homes with well-kept lawns.

and because you choose not to think about it (survival thoughts are nasty, unpleasant thoughts after all) you also chose to do nothing to prepare for it.....that is, nothing other than segrate yourself away in the wealthy burbs of CT.

Apparently the perps. didn't know that they weren't supposed to rob wealthy Doctors.....

30 cal slob
July 24, 2007, 09:27 AM
IIRC CT has the death penalty, and I can't think of three worthier candidates for the needle.

SSN Vet
July 24, 2007, 09:32 AM
The whole northeast is anti-gun

obviously a statement made in ignorance of the facts, as they plainly exist.

Maine & NH are both shall issue and both have strong constitutional protection of gun rights. Strong personal protection laws (castle doctrine). In Maine....your legally justified to use deadly force if some one is "on your property" and you have reasonable fear for your safety.

Vermont is tied w/ Alaska for having the best gun laws in the nation.

Don't paint the rest of New England Kennedy yellow or NY pink.

CT knew better, but gave up the fight (IMHO) when they succombed to the liberal clamor for more government services and voted in their income tax some 15 odd years ago.

My theory on sheeple is evolving.....

I'm thinking more and more that they just don't like to get there hands dirty doing the "hard unpleasant work" of taking care of problems themselves. So they outsource "personal security" to the Police, much in the same way they call a plumber to come when their toilet is stuffed full of to much $#^*. I suspect most, don't even have a plunger (dirty smelly unpleasant tool that it is) in their home.

CT has the death penalty

so does NH, but they chose not to use it.

SSN Vet
July 24, 2007, 09:45 AM
This is so horrible.

it surely is....

Special place in Hell for these two.

you better believe it.....regardless of what the state of CT does, these bums aren't getting away with a thing in the long run. Maybe if they had been taught that when they were young they would have thought twice about their "career choice"


When I hear or read these articles I want to kill the perps myself. Is that bad?

IMO, no, it's the "natural" reaction for a person with a God given sense of justice, that hasn't been quenched by failed human philosophy.

tydephan
July 24, 2007, 09:46 AM
Yeah......Like surviving and living with the fact they died because you were unprepared or too stupid to defend them.

This is one heck of an assumption.

You derived a lack of resistance from the fact that he lived? :uhoh:

romma
July 24, 2007, 10:03 AM
[QUOTE]I'm thinking more and more that they just don't like to get there hands dirty doing the "hard unpleasant work" of taking care of problems themselves[QUOTE]

Um, I predict that there will be a surge of inquiries at gun shops across CT over the next several days.

My part of CT is relatively pro gun compared to the Southwestern part of the State.

30 cal slob
July 24, 2007, 10:09 AM
i'm sorry to say that the story gets worse.

whatever happened to truth in sentencing?

CHESHIRE - Police have identified a 26-year-old Cheshire man and a 44-year-old Winsted man, both with long criminal histories, as suspects in a horrific home invasion in which a mother and her two daughters died Monday.

Joshua Komisarjevsky, 26, of 840 North Brooksdale Road, Cheshire, and Steven Hayes, 44, of 5-H Horn Ave., Winsted, each face a multitude of charges, including first-degree aggravated sexual assault and first-degree kidnapping. State police said the investigation is continuing and that more charges will be filed.

The men are being held on $15 million bail each for an appearance today in Superior Court in Meriden.............

......Komisarjevsky is charged with one count each of first-degree assault, first-degree aggravated sexual assault, first-degree burglary, first-degree arson, conspiracy to commit arson in the first-degree, first-degree robbery and risk of injury to a minor, plus two counts of first-degree larceny and four counts of first-degree kidnapping.

In 2002 Komisarjevsky was sentenced to nine years in prison with six years' special parole on numerous burglary charges. Police said he would break into homes in the Bristol area wearing military night vision goggles, and steal electronic items while his victims slept. He chose his houses carefully and would wear latex gloves so as not to leave fingerprints, police said..

Hayes is charged with one count each of first-degree aggravated sexual assault, first-degree burglary, first-degree arson, conspiracy to commit arson in the first-degree, first-degree robbery and risk of injury to a minor, plus two counts of first-degree larceny and four counts of first-degree kidnapping.

He has a long history of burglary and larceny convictions going back 25 years.

Investigators found a car - believed to belong to one of the suspects - in the Quarry Village subdivision about 1-1/2 miles away.
On Monday, investigators had not determined what brought the men to the Petits' home.

JohnL2
July 24, 2007, 11:00 AM
It's a wonder.
Our judicial system sure is something else isn't it? These guys sound like career criminals, yet we give them chance after chance. Now this.
Just shake my head.

Ithaca37
July 24, 2007, 11:02 AM
first-degree aggravated sexual assault
SOBs can't just kill someone, they have to rape them too.

Special place in Hell for these two.
+1

Fred Fuller
July 24, 2007, 11:40 AM
Quote:
Pax points out in one article that there are worse things than dying for your family.

Yeah......Like surviving and living with the fact they died because you were unprepared or too stupid to defend them.


No need to heap yet more coals on the head of a man who will suffer from this for the rest of his life. AFAIK none of us know him, and none of us know anything about his family's level of preparedness to deal with any sort of situation like this at all. Every human suffers lapses in awareness and shortcomings in preparedness, and sometimes a momentary lapse is all it takes for tragedy to strike.

If there is a lesson to be learned here it is that multiple layers of security are a better approach to living in today's world. Fences with locked gates can help keep would-be intruders at bay. Good home security practices using proven techniques of construction and design are a given. Electronic security systems can help a lot, if they are used habitually. Improvements in communications technology are widespread and relatively inexpensive. Dogs are wonderful additions to a family in more ways than one. A proper mindset and attitude is essential for each family member, and training and practice in defensive tactics are useful for each family member old enough to deal with them.

We don't know what this family had or didn't have, what they did or didn't do. We only know that they were victims of horrible crimes. That knowledge can provide impetus for each of us to vow, "Not my family. Not ever," and to do those things necessary to see to it that our loved ones are wrapped in overlapping layers of security.

lpl/nc

Scorpiusdeus
July 24, 2007, 02:11 PM
The second I read the age of the daughters, new it was hours long, I just knew this would be the outcome. MFERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Parole IS WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Just last night my daughter who knows never to answer the door, told me someone was at the door. First thing I did was grab my P239 and head for the door. I don't know why, but I felt danger. I look through the peep hole and it's some twelve year old kid selling stuff. Still, I'm cautious.

I don;t know if this is a good thing or bad. Lately, it feels like we are all under siege, or maybe I just read too much.

Cosmoline
July 24, 2007, 03:03 PM
In 2002 Komisarjevsky was sentenced to nine years in prison

Is my math off here?

SomeKid
July 24, 2007, 04:00 PM
No Cosmo, it is just fine. Our weak liberal judicial system however cannot do the math, and look what happened. This is why if I were to ever appoint judges, I would use a litmus test. No bleeding hearts allowed in for starters.

Question: Is 1st degree sexual assault legalese for rape? I hope not, but like Scorp, I had a bad feeling I knew what was happening to some young girls for a few hours.

Leanwolf
July 24, 2007, 06:07 PM
COSMOLINE - "Stuff like this happens all the time. The only unusual element was the victims were upper crust and well known in the community."

Most people who live in "upper crust" communities are naive people who live in denial.

"This is a nice place. Things like that don't happen here." :eek:

Frankly, it's not at all unusual for the criminals to hit "nice," upscale neighborhoods.

I am always reminded of the interview years ago where a reporter asked the infamous bank robber, Willie Sutton, "Willie, why do you rob banks?"

Sutton shrugged and said, "'Cause that's where the money is."

"Nice" communities are where the money is. Ripe for the picking.

L.W.

Zoogster
July 24, 2007, 06:25 PM
No Cosmo, it is just fine. Our weak liberal judicial system however cannot do the math, and look what happened. This is why if I were to ever appoint judges, I would use a litmus test. No bleeding hearts allowed in for starters.

We have the largest prison population in the world, and use incarceration more frequently than much of the world. Our per capita rate is also the highest in the world.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/rel/icps/worldbrief/highest_to_lowest_rates.html

Now some places have tried to have a zero tolerance, kill them all, and make them productive in the meantime policy. Nazi Germany is a good example. Very bad place to be a criminal. But if you only care about statistics, that would be one of the more effective examples. Humane and ethical has to come into question. Don't forget at any time you could suddenly become one of the criminals yourself. What do you think would happen when they come for your guns if you resist? If you survive they will lock you away and throw away the key in the system that you encouraged to exist.
What if you defend yourself in a just shoot, but the jury, which is just a random number of people does not see it that way in your future? I bet you would want it to be fairly humane in those circumstances.
Creating a police state where anyone that steps out of line can be thrown away forever is not going to safegaurd your freedom or safety either. Just give you another danger to be concerned about.

The truth is the amount of violent criminals, nevermind all criminals, is so large that locking them all up is impractical. Making them somewhat behave while locked up requires decent incentive. Keeping track and have the right to follow them around and keep tabs on them when they get out requires releasing them while they still have time over thier heads so they can be detained at anyone's discretion for questionable yet legal activities and told what to do.
These two individuals were not even violent criminals according to the information above prior to this. They were burglars, a non violent offense.

There is a reason why they have good time, and why they have parole. It is not just a reward, but a way to allow greater control over the individuals that are seen to pose less risk when they are released, as some have to be released.
If they are not paroled, then they get out and disappear with no oversight, and no accountability to anyone. It is just at a later date.
When good time only is for a very small % of the sentence, it stops serving as incentive whatsoever and they don't behave, don't let the small percent trying to change do so, and in general become worse while locked up.


The truth is you cannot stop criminals with some magical change in the legal system. You can keep them away from society longer so identified ones do thier victimization in prison against gaurds and other inmates, and not society, but the problem does not go away, and it costs a lot of the money.
When they get out they inevitably screw some women, make some children that will grow up to a single mother living in a poor area and have a high chance of turning out just like them. Then they go back to prison when the commit a new crime.

The only real solution is making criminal acts of violence very unattractive because the criminals are surrounded by people that can hurt them when they don't expect it while commiting such crimes.

You cannot stop crime contrary to that never ending goal governments feed to you for increased budgets and acceptance of lesser freedoms. You can simply allow people ways to deal with it so the impact is has is smaller.


Question: Is 1st degree sexual assault legalese for rape? I hope not, but like Scorp, I had a bad feeling I knew what was happening to some young girls for a few hours. Yes it is. Those women went through some awful things for a long time. 911 didn't protect them. It would have been great if someone could have stopped them with a bullet. Unfortunately as is often the case, a household must depend on itself for defense.

.....................i sleep better at night since the security system went in. That is just a personal alert, not a lifeline. In fact in CA they won't even respond to house alarms anymore because the majority of police time was being spent on false alarms when house alarms would go off. Now the alarm company calls by telephone and if they get no reply they just ignore it as there is nothing more that can be done without confirmation that a crime is in progress.

People have to be willing to stand up for themselves and others. That is all that protects us. Many people like to leave scary or unwanted tasks to other people. They would rather trade in rights, and freedom and liberty as long as someone can assure them they won't have to get their own hands dirty. Guess what? Empty promises, but the disappearing rights are real. The safeguards to freedom and liberty being taken for those empty promises are real.

Crime exists, has existed since prehistory, and predators will always be born, be created out of previously seemingly normal individuals, and proceed to victimize others. Being able to deal with it is the answer. You cannot just make it "go away".

Lucky45
July 24, 2007, 07:57 PM
I am holding my judgement on this case until more facts come out. Due to the fact that this scenario is normally a popular M.O. for the upper class folks when they want to get rid of other family members. I don't know anyone involved in this case, but the usual pattern is to hire known BG's, give them access to the home to carry out the crime, main ringleader usually escapes the whole ordeal, and of course VERY LARGE insurance policies are involved.
I would guess that they were each insured for $10K per person, you think??
Tragic, but I'm just waiting for the full investigation. If my hunch is right, then I might make $10K.

nate392
July 24, 2007, 08:18 PM
My mothers coworker lives in back of there property, and he took the day off to stay with the family cause of the grief, I guess one of his daughters played with one of the younger ones and were friends. Although Cheshire is kind of a snooty town, it is a very quiet beautiful town, and this has made things different. For all that are wondering why they have not charged them with homicide, they need to conduct an autopsy first to gather enough evidence to file that charge so it holds up more in court, give it a few days and that charge will prob be added.
To believe it or not, a lot of people in CT have loaded guns in there house, or at least that I know. It's sad to see this could have all been avoided if the family had been able to defend themselves sufficiently. My guess is, her being a nurse and him being a Dr. they “may ”have frowned down apon firearms ownership or saw it as un-useful. Either way its sad beyond words and I just hope justice meets with these men, and they get there proper judgment.
Godbless

Zoogster
July 24, 2007, 08:19 PM
I am holding my judgement on this case until more facts come out. Due to the fact that this scenario is normally a popular M.O. for the upper class folks when they want to get rid of other family members.

Always a possibility. You never know and have to be open to all angles in an investigation.


and of course VERY LARGE insurance policies are involved.
I would guess that they were each insured for $10K per person, you think??
This is something often funny to me that is used in court so often as motive. 10k is nothing, the funeral and cost of burial for them will probably total around that.
100k would not be that much either. Consider a wife with a $100,000 policy on a husband that makes six figures per year. Assuming they are living to the extent of thier means like most Americans and the bills they have every year total about the amount he makes, this means him dying would leave her with less than a years worth of money. If she was a house wife, raising children, she will have to sell the home she cannot afford, try to find some job with the skills she has that pays decent, and no longer be able to directly raise her children. So her husband dying actualy just lowered her quality of life, and at the most gave her around a year to adjust before she is completely on her own.
A higher policy would give a slightly longer grace period. Yet such a policy automaticly becomes a motive for murder?

The median price of a home these days is half a million dollars (CA real estate). This means the breadwinner she has depended on her whole life suddenly dying wouldn't even pay off the home's mortgage.

In this specific situation, this physician that probably makes quite a bit more himself still would have the nurse's income figured into the budget and is probably dependent on it to meet his bills (living to extent of means). Assuming around a $10k funeral (they are ridiculously overpriced) and she makes around 35k a year (median price), that means he would need a 45k policy on her to get by a year in the unlikely event she died without being financialy impacted, which is kinda the whole point of life insurance right? To be less financialy impacted in the case of someone's death? So a 50k life insurance policy on her would not be that insane. If they got life insurance on a child it should at least be enough to pay the funeral costs. So even a good 70k+ insurance policy going to this guy does not imply guilt or motive.

Life insurance policies, even what appear to be large ones are not as big of an incentive as prosecutors and court TV want you to believe. Sure there is circumstances and cases where it is, but there is even more where it is just coincidental.

30 cal slob
July 24, 2007, 08:26 PM
My guess is, her being a nurse and him being a Dr. they “may” have frowned down upon firearms ownership or saw it as un-useful.

I was thinking along the same lines. Too bad if so.

My wife, who doesn't share my enthusiasm for firearms, remarked this evening that this horrible event is going to drive more people to obtain their CT pistol permits. Thank the Lord she already has hers.

Zoogster
July 24, 2007, 09:16 PM
Found update on another thread. The girls were tied to thier beds in thier bedrooms and at least one was raped. They then had fuel poured around the room they were in and likely were burned alive.
CHESHIRE - The two girls were tied to their beds. Sources say at least one was raped. The two men also poured gasoline all around the second floor bedrooms of the two girls and lit the rooms on fire.

Relatives of the Petits released a brief statement that read: "Our precious family members have been the victims of horrible, senseless, violent assaults. We are understandably in shock and overwhelmed with sadness as we attempt to gather together to support one another and recognize these wonderful, giving beautiful individuals who have been so cruelly taken from us."

Police were dispatched to the house about 9:20 a.m. after Jennifer Hawke-Petit was forced by one of the suspects to drive to a local bank branch to get money. Hawke-Petit was able to alert a teller that her family was being held hostage because the suspect who went with her waited outside. At the bank, Hawke-Petit withdrew $15,000 from a bank account. The money was later found in the family vehicle the suspects used to flee.
As police were closing in on the Deaconwood neighborhood of half-million-dollar homes, the two men jumped in the family's Chrysler Pacifica SUV parked in the driveway. The fleeing suspects rammed a police cruiser that tried to cut them off in front of the house and continued west on Sorghum toward a police roadblock about a block away.

Sgt. Chris Cote and Officer Tom Wright, both members of the department's SWAT team, had left their cars at the roadblock and were headed toward the house armed with semiautomatic rifles. Officer Jeff Sutherland was positioned at the roadblock.
Instead of slowing for the roadblock, the fleeing suspects gunned the SUV's engine and raced toward Sutherland. The SUV slammed into two police cruisers in the center of the roadblock. Their front ends mangled, the police cars spun apart from each other on impact. Sutherland escaped injury. The Pacifica, front end damaged and airbags deployed, rolled 30 feet before stopping against a neighbor's manicured lawn.

Officers, guns drawn, swarmed the vehicle and pulled the suspects out.

Komisarjevsky is charged with one count each of first-degree assault, first-degree aggravated sexual assault, first-degree burglary, first-degree arson, conspiracy to commit arson in the first-degree, first-degree robbery and risk of injury to a minor, plus two counts of first-degree larceny and four counts of first-degree kidnapping.
Corrections Department records show Komisarjevsky was sentenced in January 2003 to nine years in prison for second-degree burglary. He was released to a halfway house in June 2006 and was granted parole 3½ months ago. Official records show several spellings for Komisarjevsky's name.

Hayes is charged with one count each of first-degree aggravated sexual assault, first-degree burglary, first-degree arson, conspiracy to commit arson in the first-degree, first-degree robbery and risk of injury to a minor, plus two counts of first-degree larceny and four counts of first-degree kidnapping.

His criminal record dates back to at least 1980. In October 2003, he was sentenced to five years in prison for third-degree burglary. In June 2006 he was released to a halfway house, but was sent back to prison five months later for drug use. He was granted parole less than three months ago.
Corrections officials said in a statement that both suspects "were deemed to be appropriate candidates for supervised parole in the community based on their criminal history, which involved the minimum level of violence." Both suspects were on a weekly reporting schedule with their parole officers "and had been in full compliance with the requirements of their release, including being employed on a fulltime basis."

Brian Garnett, a corrections department spokesman, would not say where the two men were employed.

Department of Correction Capt. Edward Ramsey said neither man had been incarcerated at the same prison facility at the same time during their time behind bars.
Robert Pidgeon, chief executive officer of Community Solutions Inc., which runs Silliman House and six other halfway houses as part of a $4 million contract with the Department of Corrections, said he doubted the two men were assigned to the same employer while at the halfway house, but said, "They certainly saw each other."

Although Pidgeon said he did not have a detailed report of their behavior and performance at Silliman House, he said he doubted there were problems prior to Hayes' failing the urine test.

"I can tell they [corrections] would yank them back quickly if there was a problem," Pidgeon said. "They're very good about that." Pidgeon said the profile of a typical CSI client is "a younger, non-violent individual with a history of drug use or alcohol dependency." When it was noted that Hayes, who is 44, didn't quite fit that description, Pidgeon said, "He's older than the inmate population in general. It's a young bunch."

Although corrections officials described each man as having a "minimal violence history," Pidgeon emphasized that their prior criminal histories involved burglary. "That's going into an occupied premises for the purpose of committing a felony," he said.

At a sentencing hearing for Komisarjevsky in 2002, authorities involved in the case said he would wear military night vision goggles and break into homes to steal electronic items while his victims slept.

The judge, James Bentivegna, called Komisarjevsky a "cold, calculating predator." The prosecutor in the case, Ronald Dearstyne, said at the time that Komisarjevsky began robbing homes when he was 14 in Cheshire. Dearstyne told the judge that Komisarjevsky would carry a military backpack, equipped with items including a knife, to rip through window screens.
CHESHIRE - Komisarjevsky had told police he burglarized homes to pay for a drug habit. But the prosecutor and judge said his actions were more calculating than those of a junkie needing cash for a fix. At his sentencing, Komisarjevsky apologized to his victims.

Komisarjevsky's home on North Brooksvale Road is about two miles from the Petits home. A man at the North Brooksvale address gave the Courant a written statement Tuesday morning but would not answer questions. The statement read: "This is an absolute tragedy. Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Petit family and all those whose lives they touched. We cannot understand what would have made something like this happen. There is nothing else we can say at this time."

Hayes has a long history of burglary and larceny convictions going back 25 years, and accumulated 23 disciplinary actions while in prison dating back to the 1980s, authorities said in court today.
Investigators found a car - believed to belong to one of the suspects - in the Quarry Village subdivision about 1-1/2 miles away from the Petits'.

On Monday, investigators had not determined what brought the men to the Petits' home.

William Petit was listed in serious but stable condition at St. Mary's Hospital in Waterbury Monday night. Officials at St. Mary's Tuesday evening declined to give out any new information on his condition.

Neighbor Kim Ferraiolo said she had just spoken to William Petit about 7:30 p.m. Sunday and nothing seemed amiss.

"They were the nicest people, just a great family," said Ferraiolo, who moved next door about three years ago.

Ferraiolo said a neighbor alerted her to the fire Monday morning and she tried to call Petit at work, but was told he never showed. She said Petit likes to tend to his flower beds and "has a great sense of humor."

Ferraiolo, like other stunned neighbors, tried to understand why the Petits' home was picked. "It's just hard to understand how someone could do something like that."

Investigators believe the two men barged into the home sometime after 3 a.m. and held family members hostage for hours, sources close to the case said. Shortly after businesses opened at 9 a.m., one of the men took Jennifer Hawke-Petit to the Bank of America branch office in Maplecroft Plaza several miles away and forced her to withdraw money.

Shortly after they returned to the house - as police were racing to the scene - the suspects set fire to the residence and fled. Cheshire Town Manager Michael Milone praised police and firefighters for risking their lives responding to a dangerous crime scene.

Neighbors said that shortly after the fire was extinguished, a firefighter climbed a ladder to enter a second-floor bedroom window in search of possible victims and then quickly backed out. Police SWAT team members then moved in and secured the home, witnesses said.

"I just can't say enough good things about how proud I am of our police officers and firefighters," Milone said. He credited his police officers for making a quick arrest.

"They exemplified the best in public service," Milone said. "Without their great work this could have been a far worse tragedy." William Petit, 50, is a prominent endocrinologist and medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center Affiliate at The Hospital of Central Connecticut in New Britain. He is a past president of the state chapter of the American Diabetes Association and was elected to the ADA Hall of Merit in 1994.

Jennifer Hawke-Petit, 48, was a nurse and co-director of the Richmond Health Center at Cheshire Academy. She had been a nurse at Yale-New Haven Hospital and was a Penn State graduate. She also had been involved with the Girl Scouts and Habitat for Humanity.
At Cheshire Academy, a private day and boarding school, she was considered a friend, a peer and a confidant for students as well as a health care provider.

"If anybody ever wanted someone taking care of the kids when they were not right there with you, it was her," said Philip Moore, the school's director of communications. "She was a mom and a health care professional. That's how she approached her job." Hayley Petit graduated in June from Miss Porter's, where she was co-editor in chief of Chautauqua, the school's "journal of scholarly writing." She was also co-captain of the crew team and a member of the cross country and basketball teams. She was set to attend Dartmouth College, her father's alma mater, where she planned to study medicine.

Jennifer Hawke-Petit was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis eight years ago. The family was active in the Connecticut chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society and Hayley had formed a fundraising team called "Hayley's Hope" that raised more than $54,000 for the cause over the past eight years.

Michaela was looking to continue her older sister's legacy by adding "Michaela's Miracle" to the campaign.

Furthermore the feather in serious condition in the hospital and the thugs armed with baseball bats likely means this guy likely took some serious blows to the head. Supposedly he came out of the house pretty out of it while it was on fire. Should make for a death penalty case for the perps.

Ithaca37
July 24, 2007, 09:27 PM
Zoogster makes some very good points. However, IMO rape and murder should make you eligible for the needle in all states. However, I am not an advocate of killing everyone or summary executions, there are an awful lot of cases in which death row inmates turn out to be innocent and were convicted on suspicious evidence.

mkonops
July 24, 2007, 09:28 PM
My part of CT is relatively pro gun compared to the Southwestern part of the State.

Believe it or not, south west ct isn't as anti as many think. In fact the whole state is fairly conservative with the exception of its big cities, which make it appear more liberal than it is. There are many small towns, like where I grew up in Oxford, that are conservative and have extremely high gun ownership rates throughout the state. Its unfortunate that there are so many yuppies and city slickers that do not know any better to ruin it for the rest of us.

Perhaps if we could get a castle doctrine, tragedies like this would be far less frequent if not eliminated.

Aguila Blanca
July 24, 2007, 09:29 PM
Connecticut does have some senseless and quirky gun laws but it is a "shall issue" state and obtaining a cc permit is not difficult.
Correction - Connecticut is a "may issue" state.

This hits me very close to home, too. The mother of a good friend of mine lived in Cheshire, not far from where this took place. (She died a year ago.) My sister knew the doctor when she lived and worked in Connecticut, and my brother used to live in the neighborhood where they are saying the BG's other vehicle was found.

I haven't discussed this with my brother yet, but it'll be interesting. His wife is even more rabidly anti-gun than my wife (if that's possible). I wonder if he'll consider getting a gun of some kind either over her objections, or without bothering to tell her.

Bellevance
July 24, 2007, 09:32 PM
Special place in Hell for these two.
you better believe it.....regardless of what the state of CT does, these bums aren't getting away with a thing in the long run. Maybe if they had been taught that when they were young they would have thought twice about their "career choice"


Best leave the mythology out of this one. Whatever punishment and suffering these two deserve had better be meted out here and now. Execution or life in prison, I'm afraid, is all that surely awaits them, and once they have gone to dust they will be as much "at peace" as their victims--with the profound exception of the survivor, the father and husband, whose life from this day on will truly be hell.

nate392
July 24, 2007, 09:35 PM
They just released that the causes of death were smoke inhalation and strangulation. I guess no shooting evidence yet.

Lucky45
July 24, 2007, 09:41 PM
Hey Zoogster,
Earlier I was just being sarcastic about the $10K insurance. I see how you were trying to figure out the values, but c'mon now. I am no doctor, made $45K per year and if I left this earth tomorrow; my wife would have walked off with a smooth $500K in insurance policy. ALL FOR AROUND $50 A MONTH with job insurance. You pay Supplementals and multiples (x3 or X4) on my salary. He was a DOCTOR!!!!! How much is 4X his salary???!!!!!

What is that old saying? MONEY IS THE ROOT OF ALL (most) EVIL.


And lastly, there are too many inconsistencies so far for me. Everyone is dead and he is not. Everyone is shot and he is not, just clubbed. He stands to get paid big time on insurance policy and nobody else.

Now, I maybe wrong but need proof since this scenario has happened too many times in the past. And people still try to pull it off, no matter how smart they think they are and how they will not be caught.

Kimber1911_06238
July 24, 2007, 09:42 PM
Maybe true but CT (IMHO) is a very gun unfriendly state and people living in the 'burbs will certainly not be home defense savvy. They have been trained to believe that 911 is the answer to home defense. CT does have boonies and attitudes are different there.

Yes, as a resident of the CT "boonies", attitudes are very different here. The part of the state towards NYC is very different. Lots of money and the attitude that the government will protect you. Around here there is more of a "take care of yourself" attitude.

SomeKid
July 24, 2007, 09:53 PM
Zoog, you can whine the liberal whine about how we imprison too many people.

Fact is, had those worms been imprisoned, some decent humans wouldn't be dead. A couple of women wouldn't have been raped.

Lucky, it is the love of money that is the root of all evil. Not money.

Zoogster
July 24, 2007, 09:57 PM
Hey Zoogster,
Earlier I was just being sarcastic about the $10K insurance. I see how you were trying to figure out the values, but c'mon now. I am no doctor, made $45K per year and if I left this earth tomorrow; my wife would have walked off with a smooth $500K in insurance policy. ALL FOR AROUND $50 A MONTH with job insurance. You pay Supplementals and multiples (x3 or X4) on my salary. He was a DOCTOR!!!!! How much is 4X his salary???!!!!!

So your wife would have been able to afford slightly lower than the median home price, and live a short time on the policy. That is certainly not the grand live in a tropical paradise a prosecutor would make it out to be in determining motive. It covers a potential hopefuly unlikely event by providing a safety net to the wife and kids should she live as a single parent after you died. She could pay the mortgage off, and have some extra cash. I guess for some that is motive, but hardly a definitive case.

And lastly, there are too many inconsistencies so far for me. Everyone is dead and he is not. Everyone is shot and he is not, just clubbed. He stands to get paid big time on insurance policy and nobody else.
Everyone was choked to death or died from the fire they started. No guns involved.

This was a gun free crime (because that makes it so much better.:rolleyes:)

Zoog, you can whine the liberal whine about how we imprison too many people.

Fact is, had those worms been imprisoned, some decent humans wouldn't be dead. A couple of women wouldn't have been raped.
Oh I agree in this case it would have been good if they had been locked up. However hindsight is always great. Are you saying all non violent offenders should permanently be locked away for the crimes they may commit in the future, or for less serious crimes they did commit?
Perhaps all drivers that get a speeding ticket should have thier license permanently revoked? It would sure keep them from having an accident in the future too, potentialy harming others.
Just because the desired goal is accomplished does not make it a good choice.

You can use the same logic to take away freedom and liberty from most people. This is a society based on judging people on what they do, not on what they might potentialy one day do.

Also you can go back to the English history in the days when people stealing a loaf of bread were permanently locked up or hanged. When there was a no tolerance policy. When they had debtors prison. Going into debt was a crime, punishable by years of hard labor to pay it off at making a fraction of what you would of as a free man. Where executions were handed out for most criminal offenses.
Guess what? Crime still happened, was still prevelant, and in fact severe punishments for lesser crimes encourages greater crimes because the scales are the same.

If a lesser crime gets near the same punishment as murder for example, you are encouraging murder. If someone gets close to a life sentence for rape or robbery for example, and a life sentence for murder, you would be encouraging predators to get rid of the victim/witness to lower thier risk of being caught without really being able to increase the penalty accordingly. So by trying to save people from one horrible crime by overdoing the punishment, you encourage one even worse. I would rather have such criminals trying to escape after commiting such crimes than killing thier victims. They do this because they know one offense is much more severely punished.

Since you cannot really go higher than life/death penatly, everything else needs to be scaled down accordingly to keep balance. Not because you want to punish them less, but because you need to.

These guys were non violent offenders. They sound like bad guys prior to this, but if they got a similar punishment for burglary that one would get for say home invasion robbery, then criminals would have little incentive to perform non violent burglaries instead of violent home invasions.

Punishments need to fit the crime. Not because we like criminals, but because it makes more sense.

Bellevance
July 24, 2007, 09:58 PM
A scheme for insurance money? No way, Lucky.

The doc did not set this one up. Not to suggest your suspicions aren't worth considering, given the circumstances; they are--but, upon consideration, the plausibility here is just about nil. Read the coverage.

A hundred to one, this invasion was pretty much random, and the way it went down suggests it was unplanned and out of control.

These scumbags are close to the worst our society is capable of producing. And I hate to say it, but there will be no eliminating them. We can only hope to monitor and contain them, and we will never be altogether successful.

Lucky45
July 24, 2007, 10:23 PM
So your wife would have been able to afford slightly lower than the median home price, and live a short time on the policy.
Hey Zoogster,
I forgot that I was chatting with folk from the northeast. For y'all, $500K is what you pay for a 6 x 9 hut in your area. Well in TX, you can buy several new houses for that kind of money.
So since, wife would pay off mortgage less than $200K on 3200 sq ft and other vehicles loans. Why could she not live comfortably with no bills??? Why would she quit her $40K job??? Maybe if I had a wife that doesn't work that might be a problem. But that would NEVER happen, someone sitting on their butt all day at my house. PLEASE!!!!!


Thanks for the correction, SOMEKID. "For the love of money.....gotta make that money man.

distra
July 24, 2007, 10:25 PM
The whole northeast is anti-gun, which is why they are now swamped with illegals and rapidly losing long time residents to the Western states.

Not really, VT has no permit to carry, NH "Life free or Die" state is not bad, ME requires a permit, CT and RI both are permit states and are not bad to get them. MA and NY are the bad ones up this way. PA is a fairly gun friendly.

This is truely a sad story. These two need to get what's coming to them. :fire: People may think I'm wierd for carrying around the house and while I'm outside, but if one or both of the adult victims were carrying, I'd like to the outcome would be much different. Our place is kind of in the boonies with a lot of private shooting areas around us. Our town is patrolled by Andy and Barney (no offense intended to LEO it's just that rural here). You can never be too safe. Chesire is a fairly up scale area with little crime, but it only takes a second to become a victim. My wife has re-evaluated her carrying habits as well. She used to think just having me armed was enough...not any more.

marty1
July 24, 2007, 10:43 PM
I live in NY and although my county makes it fairly easy to posses a handgun (I have 3) the weapon to defend my house is a 870 with 12 G 00 buck. My wife is as good as me in handling it.

PeteRR
July 24, 2007, 10:53 PM
4 lives destroyed for $15k. Senseless.

coyote_jr
July 24, 2007, 11:15 PM
Not really, VT has no permit to carry, NH "Life free or Die" state is not bad, ME requires a permit, CT and RI both are permit states and are not bad to get them. MA and NY are the bad ones up this way. PA is a fairly gun friendly.


Have you ever been to RI?:what: They aren't that bad to get them if you consider restrictions like "work purposes only" and "range purposes only" real permits. To date only 5 out of all 39 towns will issue a permit, and RI is a SHALL ISSUE state:banghead: The local issuing authorities simply don't care what the law says.

SomeKid
July 24, 2007, 11:45 PM
Zoo, you are missing the point. He was sentenced to 9 years in 2002. Why is he free a mere 5 years later? THAT is the problem. No more parole. Stop the whole thing, and no, I do not care if we have to build more prisons. We should build them with the bare minimums needed for survival. Prison should be a place of unpleasantness, but under current standards they get things like cable, or as another thread pointed out, they get internet access.

No parole, make prisons miserable, and lock up criminals. It will decrease crime further, because the vermin who like to commit crimes will be in jail.

Aguila Blanca
July 25, 2007, 01:07 AM
And lastly, there are too many inconsistencies so far for me. Everyone is dead and he is not. Everyone is shot and he is not, just clubbed. He stands to get paid big time on insurance policy and nobody else.
And I am certain that you have first-hand knowledge that there is a sizeable insurance polocy on the wife's life? And on the two daughters as well?

Caimlas
July 25, 2007, 02:00 AM
Stuff like this happens all the time. The only unusual element was the victims were upper crust and well known in the community.

This is true, and those people's lives are no less of a loss to their family members and friends than the loss of this family. However, these people were substantial contributors to society and their community. Their loss from his planet makes it a worse place, and therefore is a substantially worse tragedy and all the more angering.

I doubt not too many tears would be shed (outside of friends, neighbors, and family) if your average person - myself included - were killed like this. That's just the way it is.

This case demonstrates that bad people don't care who you are. This can happen to anyone. Fate does not discriminate and tends to balance things out unless you take aggressive action in your own interests.

Caimlas
July 25, 2007, 02:16 AM
Stuff like this happens all the time. The only unusual element was the victims were upper crust and well known in the community.

IMO, such crimes should require the needle. And these guys shouldn't have even been considered for parole. Whatever happened to "three strikes and you're out"? These bastards had many, many more chances than that, and now they've gone and done this....

The "criminal justice" system really failed the citizenry in Connecticut, and this family had to suffer for it. :(

distra
July 25, 2007, 07:02 AM
Have you ever been to RI?

Several of the guys I shoot bullseye with live in RI and have permits in both states. I've never really asked them how hard it was to get them or any restrictions. They may have "range only" permits, but I'm not sure. Most of them live in or close to Westerly, not sure how that town is as far as issuing a permit. They have not complained about the permit, only that you have to have one. Given the location of CT, it is fairly gun friendly except for that silly AWB. I think the point is that if one or both of the adult victims were armed, we'd be talking about one or two parolies pushin' up daisies.

30 cal slob
July 25, 2007, 07:48 AM
father apparently tried to confront the perps when the breakin happened. he got beat to a pulp with a baseball bat. if he only had a gun ...

the girls were tied up, raped, and basically burned to death.

perps met at a halfway house and randomly targeted the family.

a gun was involved - an AIR RIFLE.

courant.com/news/custom/topnews/hc-twosuspects0725.artjul25,0,7814115.story?coll=hc_tab01_layout

Courant.com
Unfathomable
Cheshire Victims' Relatives See Suspects Charged
By DAVE ALTIMARI, COLIN POITRAS, LYNNE TUOHY And DON STACOM

Courant Staff Writers

July 25, 2007

A judge getting ready to send Joshua Komisarjevsky to prison in 2002 called him a "cold, calculating predator."

Equipped with night-vision goggles and armed with a knife, he would slash his way through screens into houses around his hometown of Cheshire, stealing mostly electronic equipment and petty cash to pay for a drug habit.

Steven Hayes had a record more noteworthy for its length than the severity of the crimes - decades of larcenies, burglaries and check forgeries. Hayes committed most of his crimes in the northwest corner, near his home in Winsted - far from Sorghum Mill Drive in Cheshire, where the horrific events that landed him back in court played out early Monday.

The two met in Hartford in 2006, at a residential drug treatment center, and then again in a halfway house where they lived for nearly five months.

This spring, Komisarjevsky and Hayes, listed as nonviolent offenders by the state Department of Correction, were both paroled - Komisarjevsky, 26, released in April, and Hayes, 44, in May.

On Tuesday they appeared together again, this time in Superior Court in Meriden to face a litany of charges stemming from a home invasion that left a mother and her two daughters dead and a community in shock.

Although it is still unclear why they chose the home of Dr. William Petit Jr., one thing is certain, police say: The "calculating predator" and the career criminal descended to a level of violence that is almost unfathomable.

When the ordeal was over, Jennifer Hawke-Petit, 48, and her daughters, Hayley Petit, 18, and Michaela Petit, 11, were dead. The girls, sources said, were tied to their beds and raped, then left to burn after gasoline was poured around their beds and ignited.

Late Tuesday, the state medical examiner's office said Hawke-Petit was strangled and her daughters died of smoke inhalation. Their deaths were ruled homicides.

William Petit was beaten almost beyond recognition with a baseball bat, tied up in the basement and left for dead, only to make his way out of the house and to a neighbor before his home exploded into flames.

Komisarjevsky and Hayes were arraigned Tuesday. Each is charged with aggravated sexual assault, arson, robbery, kidnapping and risk of injury to a minor. Komisarjevsky was also charged with felony assault, possibly in connection with William Petit's beating. Bail for each was set at $15 million, and they are being held.

Authorities are believed to be considering whether to bring murder and capital felony charges against both men, which would make them eligible for the death penalty.

William Petit is recovering at St. Mary's Hospital in Waterbury.

"Our precious family members have been the victims of horrible, senseless, violent assaults. We are understandably in shock and overwhelmed with sadness as we attempt to gather to support one another and recognize these wonderful, giving, beautiful individuals who have been so cruelly taken," the Petit family said in a statement issued Tuesday.

Komisarjevsky lived 2 miles from the victims' home in Cheshire. His parent's house at 840 N. Brooksvale Road is a small, 1½-story bungalow with an overgrown front yard and children's toys - a rocking horse and a plastic slide - on the side.

Associates of the family said Komisarjevsky has a 5-year-old daughter, Jayda, who has been living with him and his parents. An older man was seen carrying a small child into the house Tuesday afternoon followed by several police detectives. Komisarjevsky's family released a brief statement later:

"This is an absolute tragedy. Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Petit family (and all those whose lives they touched). We cannot understand what would have made something like this happen. There is nothing else we can say at this time."

State police detectives and members of the state fire marshal's office combed through the Petit home all day Tuesday, and new details of what happened inside emerged.

William Petit may have confronted the burglars shortly after they broke in, sources said.

Police recovered $15,000 that Hawke-Petit was forced to withdraw from a bank that morning while the rest of her family was held hostage. She told bank officials who balked at giving her the money that she needed it because her family was being held hostage. Bank officials then notified police.

About a half-dozen relatives of the victims were in Superior Court as the suspects made their first appearance before a judge. A blond woman, who did not give her name, leaned forward and sobbed as the two prisoners were brought into court. Another relative tried to comfort her. The family left without speaking to members of the press.

Hayes, a pudgy man with a shaved head, was brought into court first. He wore an orange prison jumpsuit, his hands clasped to a thick belly chain around his waist. A bail commissioner rattled off a litany of criminal charges dating back to when Hayes was a teenager in the '80s.

The court official said Hayes was on special parole in connection with an October 2003 burglary conviction out of Bantam. He was given a five-year sentence and his release date from parole was May 4, 2008.

Hayes also has a conviction for possession of marijuana in 2002 and several convictions in 1996 and 1997 for passing bad checks, forgery, petty larceny and escape from custody, the latter stemming from an incident in Hartford in 1996. In 1993, he was convicted of a burglary charge in Litchfield and given a five-year suspended sentence and five years of probation.

Hayes was arrested three months later and charged with forgery and violating his probation. He was sent back to jail but it was unclear Tuesday how much time he served before being released again. Hayes also has a record for theft of a firearm and carrying a firearm without a permit, officials said.

A bail commissioner said Hayes was issued 23 disciplinary tickets during his times in prison. Three members of the Department of Correction's special emergency response team accompanied the two suspects to court.

Judge Christina G. Dunnell set Hayes' bail at $15 million and ordered him held without chance of release because of his parole status. Hayes' public defender, Tom Conroy, asked for Hayes to be put on a suicide watch. Conroy said Hayes was taking pain medication.

Someone in the court hissed, "Scumbag!" as Hayes was led back to the holding pen. Hayes' case was transferred to Superior Court in New Haven and continued to Aug. 7.

Komisarjevsky, a slight man with tousled black hair and a thin mustache and beard, was also out on parole at the time of the home invasion.

Public defender David Smith, Komisarjevsky's attorney, said his client attended a year of schooling at Asnuntuck Community College in Enfield. Dunnell set Komisarjevsky's bail at $15 million and transferred the case to New Haven with an Aug. 7 continuance date.

Attorney Patrick Culligan, head of the state public defender's office special capital felony unit, was on hand for Tuesday's court proceedings. Culligan said outside court that it was "conceivable" that the state could bring more serious charges and it was his department's policy to be present and prepared in advance.

Nancy Manning, a diabetic patient of Petit's from Rocky Hill, was also in court. She said she felt compelled to be there.

Manning said she wanted to know "why they didn't get stopped and why didn't someone throw away the key long, long ago."

"One looks very young, the other very callous and cold-hearted," Manning said later outside court.

Komisarjevsky and Hayes met when they were both at Berman House residential treatment center on Sargeant Street in Hartford in June 2006. They were there from June 13 to July 25, and their stays at Silliman House on Retreat Avenue in Hartford overlapped from July 31 until Nov. 26, 2006. Between the two places, they spent 51/2 months together - until Hayes failed a urine test and was sent back to prison

Robert Pidgeon, chief executive officer of Community Solutions Inc., which runs Silliman House and six other halfway houses for the Department of Correction, said he doubted the two men were assigned to the same employer while at the halfway house, but said, "They certainly saw each other."

Although Pidgeon said he did not have a detailed report of their behavior and performance at Silliman House, he said he doubted there were problems before Hayes failed the urine test. "I can tell you [corrections] would yank them back quickly if there was a problem," Pidgeon said. "They're very good about that."

Correction department records show Komisarjevsky was sentenced in January 2003 to nine years in prison for second-degree burglary. He was released to a halfway house in June 2006.

Since his offense was non-violent and the sentence longer than two years, the Board of Pardons and Paroles considered his parole after he had completed 50 percent, DOC spokesman Brian Garnett said. He was granted parole on April 10, 2007.

Hayes was sentenced to five years in prison for third-degree burglary in 2003. In June 2006 he was released to a halfway house, but was sent back to prison five months later for drug use. He was granted parole on May 3, 2007.

Correction department officials say the two men had been reporting to their parole officers since their release and had full-time jobs. Officials would not reveal where they worked.

A state senator whose district includes Cheshire called for a review of the state parole board's decision to release the suspects into the community despite their lengthy records and prior convictions.

"Issuing judgment and laying blame is counterproductive," said Sen. Sam Caligiuri, R-Waterbury. "Nevertheless, three people are dead. ... We owe it to the victims, their families and friends, and to the public to find out why these suspects were seen as ready for supervised parole and what action the state can take to prevent such a horrific thing from happening again."

Komisarjevsky was first arrested in May of 2002 for a series of burglaries in the Cheshire area. Shortly after, state police linked him to 11 burglaries in the Burlington area. It was at his sentencing on those charges that Superior Court Judge James Bentivegna in Bristol called him a "cold, calculating predator."

State officials said that Komisarjevsky started burglarizing homes when he was 14 but that most of the crimes occurred during an eight-month spree between July 2001 and February 2002 after he had bought night-vision goggles.

Prosecutors said he stole more than $20,000 worth of goods from his victims.

Several of those victims were stunned to learn Tuesday afternoon that the man who had broken into their homes is accused of the horrific Cheshire crime.

"That was him? Really? That just sends chills up my spine," Jamie Maheu said. "He just escalated from what he did six years ago."

About a month after Maheu and her husband, Paul, were married, Komisarjevsky broke into the home they owned on Wildewood Run. Komisarjevsky's home at the time was nearby, on Wilderness Way in Bristol. The Maheus didn't know until the next day that someone had sneaked into their house overnight. Cash had been stolen from the husband's wallet, and papers from the wife's briefcase had been scattered in the doorway.

"My wife is still nervous about leaving windows open in the evening, and I agree with that. We stopped using the window air conditioner at night. This still affects her - it was not a good feeling," Paul Maheu said.

Another victim, who requested anonymity, said she nearly caught Komisarjevsky burglarizing her home on Wilderness Way.

"I had gone to bed, shut down the house and heard something, as if a paperback book had gotten knocked off a kitchen counter downstairs," she said. "I immediately woke up and yelled at the top of my lungs `Get out of here now.'"

The woman ran out the garage door and called 911 from under a streetlight.

"We found out later that I scared him by yelling and he tripped; he was carrying my stereo outside and hit his head on the concrete floor," she said. "I didn't sleep right for at least a year. I was awakened by fear. I got an alarm system - I'm a big believer in alarms now."

Contact Dave Altimari at daltimari@courant.com.

Courant Staff Writer Hilda Munoz contributed to this story.

Ithaca37
July 25, 2007, 08:05 AM
The whole northeast is anti-gun, which is why they are now swamped with illegals and rapidly losing long time residents to the Western states.

Maine is one of the most gun friendly states in the country. Sure there are probably a couple with more relaxed laws, but we don't really have any restrictions here. Well, other than the damn federal laws and CCW permits. No waiting periods, no restrictions on type, including class III. no magazine capacity limits. No limits on other self defense things like pepper spray, tasers, etc. There are a number of southern states that are more restrictive than Maine.

romma
July 25, 2007, 08:28 AM
Correction - Connecticut is a "may issue" state.


Double recorrection, CT is actually shall issue as long as you meet the same criteria most other Shall issue states have.

If your local issuing government wont issue you a temp permit, you may appeal to the board examiners and they will issue you a CT permit as long as you are qualified like everyone else.

Kimber1911_06238
July 25, 2007, 08:33 AM
+1 on romma's comment. It's actually pretty easy to get a permit here as long as you have kept out of trouble.

Bellevance
July 25, 2007, 08:39 AM
So it seems reasonable now to infer from the expansive piece in today's Hartford Courant (posted above) that if the doctor had been armed with a 12-gauge, or with some other firearm that he knew how to handle, he might have thwarted the invasion and saved his family.

Did he try to confront them with a baseball bat? If that's all you've got, I guess that's what you do. But a tragedy like this one, rare as it may be, illustrates why people have to consider home defense tactics (and weapons) more seriously than the great majority of people do now.

Kimber1911_06238
July 25, 2007, 09:02 AM
no might about it...If you have a firearm that you know how to use and there are two criminals without a firearm, you will win every time. such a tragedy

30 cal slob
July 25, 2007, 09:05 AM
Punishments need to fit the crime.

Right-o. I'd probably be in a long line of volunteers to douse the perps with gasoline, repeatedly shove splintery broomstick up their (places where the sun don't shine), and drop a match for a perp-roast.

Frandy
July 25, 2007, 09:12 AM
Tragic and sad. As we on THR already know, this is why one should own firearms, train oneself to use them properly, and (in my opinion), locate them around your house, out of sight but easy to get to.

We will never know if having firearms would have helped this family. And, there is always the possibility that these thugs would have taken the family's guns and shot all of them. But, I'll put my money on being prepared and taking that risk.

I certainly hope the authorites charge them with capital murder. I'm guessing they will.

Bellevance
July 25, 2007, 10:19 AM
I'd probably be in a long line of volunteers to douse the perps with gasoline, repeatedly shove splintery broomstick up their (places where the sun don't shine), and drop a match for a perp-roast.

Sign me up.

FieroCDSP
July 25, 2007, 10:26 AM
We will never know if having firearms would have helped this family. And, there is always the possibility that these thugs would have taken the family's guns and shot all of them. But, I'll put my money on being prepared and taking that risk

Better to be armed to fight and maybe be executed later(assuming all goes to pot) than to be burned alive. Honestly, my heart goes out to the Doctor and the rest of the families. There can be a lot for the rest of us to learn from this tragedy.

raubritter
July 25, 2007, 10:40 AM
Here's info on the nightmare that happened in my neck of the woods:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_family_murder

I live in the ghetto. If I cross the main road at the end of my street, it instantly turns into this "nice" neighborhood where people put forth a massive effort to live in a fanatasy land. They leave their doors unlocked, leave expensive things sitting on their car seats, have the situational awareness of sea slugs, and are WAY anti-gun. Their stuff is constantly stolen and they're stunned and baffled every single time. Even after the horrific murders their ENTIRE plan for dealing with violent gobblins is to call the police. They say that to do anything else is "living in fear". So they admit that they have chosen to live in a gov-sponsored delussion.

Justin
July 25, 2007, 11:19 AM
This thread has outlived its usefulness.

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