Cops took my gun today.


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helpless
August 2, 2007, 03:31 AM
I was in car accident as a passenger in a friends car today. Someone ran a stop sign and basically put us into a slow speed pit maneuver spinning us 180 degrees and in to a curb. I felt fine at first but after walking around started to feel dizzy and sharp pains from my left ear down past my ribs. I sat down and was unable to get up on my own.

That said. The ambulance came, Asked if I needs to go to the hospital, I told them that I wasnt sure I thought I was fine just a little pain and told them that they where the experts. Needless to say after they saw me try to stand up, we both agreed that I should be checked out and I was told if I went they would need to strap me down, the whole stretcher treatment. My first thought went to my sidearm. I told the paramedic that I was concealed carry permit holder and that my sidearm was on my right hip. He was cool enough not to make a big scene and waited with me until the deputy arrived and pulled him aside out of earshot of others and explained. The deputy told me, hang tight and he would see me in the ambulance.

After I was all strapped down the deputy entered and took my info, asked details on the firearm and then asked me the best way to remove it, seeing how I was pretty tied up. He unbuckled my belt, pulled the entire rig including holster off the belt as I told him it was chambered he said, no problem.

He gave me a receipt and slipped his card in my shirt pocket and told me to call in him in the morning so he could meet me at evidence to reclaim it. He told me, that with him being there, it should be a non issue.

I am lucky because he recognized my last name as my father is a capt in the next county over and I had actually met this guy once in a unrelated incident.

The other officer who was with him mentioned The XD .45 was a nice piece and commented on how they would have never thought I would of had that under my shirt.

We will see in the morning how much trouble it is to retrieve my sidearm. Auto accidents resulting in an ambulance ride was a total curve ball I never thought about when carrying concealed. I have been in accident that were pretty serious rendering my unconscious. So I always figured that my concealed handgun would be the least of my worries during an accident. I never counted on that middle ground where you have to inform the paramedics and all that follows. I tried to handle it the best I could but I have to admit I was a little out of it. I could have given it to my buddy but I didnt want to make him responsible for it.

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Greell
August 2, 2007, 03:41 AM
Sounds like you handled it pretty well then!

side note, hope you're alright mate

bogie
August 2, 2007, 03:51 AM
I had a friend in pre MO CCW days who had a .38 derringer in his pocket when he got hit by a truck on his motorcycle.

Hospital returned it to him when he checked out.

helpless
August 2, 2007, 03:51 AM
I guess I am fine, All bones where they are supposed to be. Some pain, Hoping it is just the normal soreness to be expected. When I was much younger I would have muscled through and walked away from such a bang up but as I get older, I want to be on the safe side.

PPGMD
August 2, 2007, 03:53 AM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.

kd7nqb
August 2, 2007, 03:58 AM
I think you did the perfect thing. Personal belongings tend to wander off or at least careless get tossed in plastic bags. Frankly I think it perfect that the LEO was so cool about the whole thing.

helpless
August 2, 2007, 04:04 AM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.

I thought about this, but I was getting ready to be strapped down to a stretcher and would just assume bring it up before that whole ordeal. I figured that they would okay no big deal since I had a permit to carry but the medic called the LEO because he told me they would have had a cow at the hospital if they would have found it then. And frankly I wasnt really in the mood to try to combat anti reactions. We will see in the morning if I made the right decision. I agree I wasnt happy about it but I was at the mercy of circumstance.

General Geoff
August 2, 2007, 04:20 AM
Did pretty good considering the circumstance. I'm not entirely sure what I'd do given that situation. Probably the same thing, though if a portion of my body just went numb, one of the last things on my mind would be who to surrender my sidearm to..

Prince Yamato
August 2, 2007, 04:40 AM
You did the right thing. If they had to suddenly operate on you in the hospital, they may have had to remove the gun from your care and it could have gotten lost or stolen. Heck, an EMT could have stole it from you while you were strapped down on the stretcher.

CNate
August 2, 2007, 06:26 AM
Glad to hear your ok. I'd say you did right, worst case scenario they could have stuck you in an MRI with your CCW on you...we all know what happens then apparently :rolleyes:

critter
August 2, 2007, 07:46 AM
My local gun dealer (and ccw instructor) is also a paramedic. Here, they have a 'safe box' on the ambulance in which to store ccw firearms. Good solution IMHO.

spartan55
August 2, 2007, 08:24 AM
I hope it turns out alright, personnally I'd hate for anyone to touch my gun let alone take it from me. However in this case the leo securing it and giving you a reciept is a whole lot better than you passing out in route or at the hospital and a medic, nurse thinking they need the pistol more than you.

Vonderek
August 2, 2007, 08:33 AM
The title of the thread made me think it was going to be about a LEO trampling someone's rights. I'd say everyone involved handled the situation calmly and professionally. I think you did the right thing. No telling where the gun would have ended up had you kept it with you to the hospital. On a sidenote, when my brother was killed in an accident, somewhere between the ambulance to the hospital to the funeral home his watch and gold ring "disappeared".

The Amigo
August 2, 2007, 08:39 AM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.

Walking with a loaded gun around certain areas of a hospital is not a good idea, There has been cases of accidental discharges when people with loaded guns especially the .45 cocked and locked one in the chamber type that have become magnetized and the hammer has dropped on them. This has happened a lot especially with LEO,s walking around sonogram and MRI machines that have very big magnets. There has been evidence of guns being magnetized even for days latter after it has been exposed to magnetic resonance, Owners have found this by guns attracting paper clips ext..

I know this because it was brought to my department as a safety memo, Me being the I dont believe it type started searching and found some interesting articles about this problem.

I think you did fine.

cambeul41
August 2, 2007, 09:13 AM
Amigo

XDs are not carried "cocked and locked." They are carried cocked, but there is no external, thumb operated safety. They are carried in what a 1911 person could call "condition 0." The grip and trigger safeties are all that is needed.

unspellable
August 2, 2007, 09:16 AM
One important point here. One can take a whack to the head and appear to be fine after wards, only later (Within an hour or so.) to develop VERY serious problems. This happened a dog we once had. he took a whack to the noggin, seemed to be all right for a while and then became distressed. Took him to the hospital and he died within an hour. This efect is due to swelling in the brain.

The moral of the story is NEVER take a head injury casually, even if it seems slight.

PennsyPlinker
August 2, 2007, 09:18 AM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.

1. Hospital workers will steal everything and anything that is not nailed down, and some things that are. While most of our visits have been few, even when we have gone for outpatient stuff, we are told to send anything of any of value home!

2. I would rather have a cop who is supposed to know how to handle something like this handle it rather than someone who knows nothing and panics, shooting me, himself (or herself), or someone else, or just freaks out and starts screaming.

Sistema1927
August 2, 2007, 09:19 AM
Sounds to me like you encountered a concientious deputy who will make sure that your weapon is properly secured and cared for until such time as you can retrieve it. Glad to hear that you weren't banged up any worse than you were.

Kim
August 2, 2007, 10:04 AM
Had a guy traveling through my neck of Arkansas that had a wreck in a mobile home. The ambulance just brought in his 2 rifles and three handguns and we put them in the medicine closet till he was ready to go. No big deal.

tydephan
August 2, 2007, 10:06 AM
You did good man.

You kept your reasoning about you during a stressful time. You used common sense.

1. Hospital workers will steal everything and anything that is not nailed down, and some things that are. While most of our visits have been few, even when we have gone for outpatient stuff, we are told to send anything of any of value home!

2. I would rather have a cop who is supposed to know how to handle something like this handle it rather than someone who knows nothing and panics, shooting me, himself (or herself), or someone else, or just freaks out and starts screaming.

Perfect summation of my thoughts.

I wouldn't sweat about getting your gun back. You know the LEO. He gave you a receipt. There was a witness (the paramedic). You should be in good shape.

Good job all around handling this situation.

Get well! You got more decals to make! LOL!

RoadkingLarry
August 2, 2007, 10:25 AM
Sounds like appropriate actions were taken by all. Similar incident with a biker buddy of mine, he crashed and was going to have to be transported(helo, bad crash) but he informed the Trooper that he had a CCW and permit. his weapon was taken by local sheriff dept for safe keeping and promptly returned to him when he was able to go back and get it. Should be no worries on your part.

baz
August 2, 2007, 10:37 AM
Had a guy traveling through my neck of Arkansas that had a wreck in a mobile home. The ambulance just brought in his 2 rifles and three handguns and we put them in the medicine closet till he was ready to go. No big deal.Ah, yes, but that's Arkansas. :cool:

As for hospitals, here they are anti-CCW. I agree that it was better to hand it off to an LEO, who would give a receipt, than wait and let someone at a hospital find it.

MinnMooney
August 2, 2007, 10:45 AM
I certainly think that you did the correct thing by telling the EMT and then securing your weapon with the police officer. What if you had passed out sometime during the ambulance ride or in the hospital? What if you'd woke up to realize that your gun was missing? A very scary realization that would be. At those times when you may not be in complete control of yourself (drinking, accident w/possible head injury or even just getting gas at the dental office) it's best to secure your weapon where you'll know that it will be when you wake up.
Please keep us informed about the outcome when you show up at the evidence room.

Bacchus
August 2, 2007, 10:50 AM
Sounds like you kept your cool, even in the midst of an injury and difficult situation. Good luck on your recovery.

indie
August 2, 2007, 10:51 AM
glad you made it out relatively okay.


and hope you get your gun back soon.

helpless
August 2, 2007, 10:58 AM
I Could not wait. First thing this morning I woke up and went to retrieve my pistol. When I arrived I told the lady at the desk that I was in an accident the day before and I ... She cut me off and said, Gave the Officer your weapon for safe keeping? I replied "yes". She said that Mrs, So and So was expecting me.

The lady came out with my XD, Slide locked back Mag out and empty. She took my drivers license and set the pistol on the counter. She said she had to run a background check to make sure I didnt become a felon since obtaining the firearm. I didnt see any reason to make a stink and I waited 3-5 minutes and she returned and told me that they can not release a firearm and Ammunition on the same day, and asked if I could come back another day for the 14 rounds of .45acp. She handed me the XD and I left. When I got to my car, the spare mag went in and I was whole again.

So I guess I was lucky! This is the way it should always go. I am thinking about writing a letter thanking them for handling the situation so professionally. Maybe a letter to the LEO is in order as well. Some of you might say they were just doing their jobs, but it sucks to only get letters complaining all the time.

Happy Ending.

thanks guys
-Chris

helpless
August 2, 2007, 11:06 AM
The title of the thread made me think it was going to be about a LEO trampling someone's rights.

I titled the thread the way I did to entice people to read it.

tydephan
August 2, 2007, 11:13 AM
I am thinking about writing a letter thanking them for handling the situation so professionally. Maybe a letter to the LEO is in order as well.

Please be sure to do this.

1.) It is a good exercise in showing the world (even just those that read the letter) that there are very responsible gun owners in the world.

2.) Chances are the letter will go in the LEO's file, which is a good thing when it comes time for evaluations.

Big Calhoun
August 2, 2007, 11:16 AM
Gods speed in your recovery!

This situation I actually have thought about in the past and the only solution I could come up with was to have my wife get her CHL so that if there was a reason to be separated or whatever, she could legally take and carry my firearm.

Getting her to get her CHL is a whole other issue though...

Noxx
August 2, 2007, 11:21 AM
Glad to hear you're okay.

I think you handled it very well. In such a situation I'd rather have the LEO in question handling the firearm than someone at the hospital who may or may not have had any firearms training.

Glockster35
August 2, 2007, 11:48 AM
I am glad to hear you are doing OK after your accident. One thing to consider in this case is that the local hospital may not have accepted you with your firearm, and the police officer simpoly took it to save you from ass-pain at the hospital.

I am also glad you got your pistol back without too much trouble!

I do feel a letter to the department and LEO are in order, but do not forget the clerks in the evidence room. They probably NEVER get "letter of appreciation" and many feel it is a no-thanks type of job!

Rock_Steady
August 2, 2007, 11:59 AM
You really did the right thing - I'm a nurse in an ER and have had to handle CCW's in the past. Something that we take for granted - like safe gun handling - is just lost on some people. There were surgeons TERRIFIED that there was a gun in the room - they were afraid to touch it, like it would go off on its own - I was happy i was there to drop the magazine and unload it, "make it safe" (with the patients permission) and then had to call our security to retrieve it for safekeeping. Turns out they had to call the local PD and have them come and get it. I carry myself, and have my worries about the event of an accident when only my non-gunny coworkers are around.

Neo-Luddite
August 2, 2007, 12:05 PM
Hope you're OK, and the weapon will (I bet) be just fine.

Now, if it had 'gone away' some how--would the driver's auto policy cover the replacment cost? Or, would your own homeowners/renters insurance cover it? Just some stray thoughts--'cause really everything seems to be in order with the chain of custody.

Brad Johnson
August 2, 2007, 12:10 PM
I didnt see any reason to make a stink and I waited 3-5 minutes and she returned and told me that they can not release a firearm and Ammunition on the same day, and asked if I could come back another day for the 14 rounds of .45acp.

Good handling of the situation, and kudos to the dept for keeping things professional and straightforward. I do have to admit I would have probably gotten in a good-natured jab at the ammo part by saying, "No problem, I have a couple of boxes in the car. Need some?"

Brad

Neo-Luddite
August 2, 2007, 12:10 PM
Just caught this line: they can not release a firearm and Ammunition on the same day.

This comes after the backround check? That's a petty and bizarre policy, isn't it? Are you sure this wasn't Illinois?

Glad you're OK.

RNB65
August 2, 2007, 12:16 PM
I think you need to retitle this thread. It's intentionally misleading. It has an ominous tone that imples intentional wrongdoing by LEO's. But after reading what actually happened, it's pretty clear that the LEO handled the situation properly.

TonyB
August 2, 2007, 12:19 PM
Around here you can't buy a gun and ammo at the same time at Wal-Mart,and the manager sometimes wants to follow you out to the car if you buys a gun.....
I often think about this situation too..glad it worked out OK.Although when I watch the show COPS,and see how some of these guys handle an unknown gun,it makes me cringe.Luckily I carry a revolver,so it's pretty straight forward.Although I'll bet some young officers wouldn't be familiar w/ a wheelgun either.

DogBonz
August 2, 2007, 12:41 PM
I am thinking about writing a letter thanking them for handling the situation so professionally. Maybe a letter to the LEO is in order as well.

Please do this. The officer was professional and did exactly what he said that he would do. You got your sidearm back easy as pie, no hassles. People like getting letters for doing their job well, and their superiors like when folks are happy with the officers in their community. Showing a little appreciation (formal) for a job well done will act as an incentive for the officers to keep handling things in a professional manner.

CountGlockula
August 2, 2007, 12:47 PM
I'm glad you're ok at least.

unrealtrip
August 2, 2007, 12:57 PM
Two things:

1- Glad you made it out in good shape.
2- While the cop was cool about it, I don't understand why your gun was confiscated?

I mean what really would be the difference between that and him taking your wallet, or shoes or maybe a personal camera if you had one in your pocket?

lawson4
August 2, 2007, 01:03 PM
I'm sure the officer was aware that is someone lifted his wallet and was negligent or ignorant about how it worked, it wouldn't go off and hurt someone.

lawson4

helpless
August 2, 2007, 03:52 PM
I mean what really would be the difference between that and him taking your wallet, or shoes or maybe a personal camera if you had one in your pocket?

Are you seriouslly compairing a pistol that holds 13+1 rounds of 45acp to a Camera? Does this Camera shoot laser beems out of the lens?

I gave it to the officer to hold on to. It was my choice, I could have left it in my friends glove box or called a family member, I had options. My friends car was possibly going to be towed, He did not have a permit, all family was to far away to consider and I was getting ready to pass out. He did not take confiscate anything.

I am the first to jump up when a LEO is out of line but this was not the case. After my sidearm was in safe hands I was able to concentrate on my injuries.

Sure it would have been nice if he would have placed my pistol on a velvet pillow in his passenger seat and followed me to the hospital and waited for me to check out and then return it to me, so I did not have to go one night with out it.

Then again I could have been told today that they cant find my gun and I should check back next week.

All is well and my pistol and I are back together again.

ArfinGreebly
August 2, 2007, 04:11 PM
Yes, write a commendation for the officer of record, also complimenting the department personnel on their professional demeanor.

You might also want to commend the ambulance dude for keeping a level head, discretion, and professional conduct.

Your guardian angel assigned you some good people for this series of events.

Make sure they get acknowledged.

glockman19
August 2, 2007, 04:21 PM
Excellent communication between everyone involved. You didi the correct thing in notirying the paramedic, he did the correct thing in pulling the oficer aside and telling him, the officer did the only thing he could do and properly gave you a reciept an dhis card. Desk officer/clerk was courteous and everything worked out. My only surprise is that I would have expected them to run the BG check before you got there. That aside I'd say everything was handeled well all the way around.

Glad to hear you were not injured.

Chalk one up for all of the good guys. When everyone does what they are supposed to do the system works out all right doesn't it?

CWL
August 2, 2007, 04:37 PM
I'm a little bit curious why so many people think this situation would have turned out bad? This shows a deep distrust for LEOs, EMT and Hospital workers -probably 3 professions where you need to place the most trust in.

I believe that there are still more good people around than bad, of course we do need to prepare for the bad ones...

DoubleTapDrew
August 2, 2007, 04:37 PM
Glad you seem to be ok and kudos to the LEO and others for being professional about it. I also think you should write a letter thanking him.
I've never heard about them not releasing a gun and it's ammo on the same day before. I guess that's what spare mags are for though.
You didn't find any names written or engraved on your gun did ya? :p

helpless
August 2, 2007, 05:22 PM
I'm a little bit curious why so many people think this situation would have turned out bad? This shows a deep distrust for LEOs, EMT and Hospital workers -probably 3 professions where you need to place the most trust in.


Because we (I) have come to expect snide remarks and a hard time for exercising our rights. With so many people involved You may of expected at least one giving you a hard time, maybe it was my demeanor, like a lot of people say it is all about your attitude.

I am going to write the letter over the weekend and have my father look it over, he is in administration with the sheriffs office the next county over.

Any suggestions on how to make the letter most effective?

Bazooka Joe71
August 2, 2007, 05:45 PM
Did you talk to your XD45 this morning? What did she have to say? Was she lonely last night? Did they keep her warm and cozy or did they neglect her?

I need answers here.

















:D

kellyj00
August 2, 2007, 05:53 PM
note to self: when checking in a weapon with the police, be sure to pocket the magazine first or you'll have to make two trips to get it all back again.
Silly rule.... so, when you come back the next morning you can't have the exact same empty weapon in your pocket? Geesh.

Glad to hear you're ok.

Would've sucked if you were unconscious and they found your weapon then. Who knows where it'd be.

Thumper
August 2, 2007, 06:04 PM
I got hit from behind by a drunk while on a motorcycle about 5 months ago. Told the responding officer that I was carrying, but I was already on the backboard.

It stayed in place until they unstrapped me (at the hospital) and my girlfriend (who happens to be a doctor) took my G19 and holster and put them in her purse.

No worries.

CDignition
August 2, 2007, 06:12 PM
It would have only turned out bad if you were not legally carrying(no CCW or a felon)..
your name fits you today too you were helpless..;)

Brad Johnson
August 2, 2007, 06:53 PM
Any suggestions on how to make the letter most effective?

Name names, if you can. Say something "like I appreciate officer Joe for his professionalism and courtesy in my time of crisis. Many, even those in law enforcement, would have reacted with fear, suspicion, or scorn to a concealed-carry permit holder with a firearm on their person. Officer Joe did not. Not only did his calm demeanor and matter-of-fact approach reassure me that my firearm would be safely out of harm's way (and out of curious hands), it also put those around us at ease. He is to be commended."

Brad

MT GUNNY
August 2, 2007, 06:55 PM
Yes on the letter leo's will remember it.

Kentak
August 2, 2007, 07:09 PM
2- While the cop was cool about it, I don't understand why your gun was confiscated?

And I don't understand why you don't understand that. Mmmmm, probably because they don't want a perfect stranger armed in their Medic Unit, or ER. Because they don't know what the patient's mental and physical state is going to be. Because they don't want people who are untrained in gun handling have to handle a gun which is in god-knows-what condition in order to secure it.

Get real, man.

K

Oohrah
August 2, 2007, 07:29 PM
LEO experienced at handling firearms . Many EMT are not.
With a family background in LEO and a CCW should not be
a consideration of any problem.:D

Stevie-Ray
August 2, 2007, 08:25 PM
While the cop was cool about it, I don't understand why your gun was confiscated? Don't know about other states, but I expect it's commonly illegal to take a firearm into a hospital, like here in Michigan.

FieroCDSP
August 2, 2007, 09:03 PM
Glad you're okay. It sounds like the system worked like it's supposed to, IMO. You took the responsible road and informed the EMT of your piece, in the interests of safety. The EMT didn't panic and refered the matter to the officer. The officer secured the piece safely (asking you how best to remove it), gave a reciept for it and made sure there weren't any hassles in retrieving it when you were well again (aside from the check and the ammo deal).

Write the letter. Promote good behavior, punish bad.:D

vynx
August 2, 2007, 09:42 PM
I work at a hospital and I think the best thing to do is let a LEO take the gun.

Most people in healthcare are not firearm friendly - it is a small minority that like guns and know how to handle them.

So it is better and safer to let someone (LEO) that knows more about firearms handle it.

I wouldn't worry about hopital staff stealing anything - the person who wrote that was wrong.

The problem is hospitals by their nature have a lot of stangers walking through them, visiting, outpatient, etc. and hospital satff cannot make the time to watch your posessions - people get priority not possessions.

Anyway, hospitals are notorious places for theives professional and amatuer so it is better to not bring any valuables there. There are theives that target patient rooms for money, wallets, watches and a gun would be a nice surprise. They know that patients are usually not 100% so they go looking for things to steal.

Glad your alright and from what I heard a positive letter looks good in the records at promotion time.

hemiram
August 3, 2007, 04:07 AM
I think this was handled about as well as it could have been, with the exception of the ammo nonsense. Having seen a couple of people "lose it" after what appeared to be minor injuries that turned out to be pretty severe head injuries, taking the gun for safekeeping is a smart move.

My brother in law was hit by a car that went though a red light, and knocked him into the air, off the windshield, and then onto the sidewalk where he broke his neck and his wrist. He was taken to the hospital, and had all the tests and they put the halo on him, and suddenly, he started getting very aggressive. My sister didn't get called right away, she was out shopping and when she got home, there was a couple messages from the hospital, and one where they let him talk into the phone. At that point, he was perfectly sane, just hurting really bad. By the time she got to the hospital, he was threatening to kill everyone, including her, and they had to put him in restraints. They sedated him for a couple of days and ran tests on him, and all he appeared to have was a mild concussion. His rage lasted for over 10 days, his mother came and he tried to bite her when she ignored my sister and the docs telling her not to. He threatened, made amazingly nasty comments about, and insulted everyone around him, and then right in the middle of a rant about burning the hospital down, he stopped and asked my sister to go get him something to eat at this place they go to all the time. He was fine from that point on, with the exception of having to wear the halo for a long time. My sister said that in all the years she's known him, she had never seen anything remotely approaching the level of anger he had when he was raging away. The doctors were actually quite worried about him until he came out of it.

frankcostanza
August 3, 2007, 04:10 AM
sounds like you handled it well. hopefully you wont have any trouble getting it back!

Drusagas
August 3, 2007, 04:22 AM
Um, he got it back already....:uhoh: unless you were talking about the mags and ammo:cool:

nemoaz
August 3, 2007, 04:38 AM
Most people in healthcare are not firearm friendly - it is a small minority that like guns and know how to handle them.

That depends on where you are talking about. I used to work in a rural Appalachian hospital ER in the early 90s. It was gun central. All the nurses carried pistols in their purses. One made fun of the others because their guns were smaller than her 2 1/2 inch Model 19. The security guards usually carried a hidden pistols. The doctors all collected guns. Don't think anyone had a permit. Two of the staff members were also police officers (one part-time) and they surely didn't care.

A flight medic told a story about flying into the hospital to pickup two gunshot victims who had shot each other. The medic noticed a disturbance in the waiting room and became concerned. He told the ER doctor, who was charting something, about his concerns. He was worried that the families of the shooter and victim were both outside and that there could be more violence or gunplay. The medic said he told the doctor thinking that the doctor would phone the police and ask them to expedite their response. Instead, the doctor walked outside through the ambulance entrance to his car and opened the trunk. He retrieved a large revolver from the trunk and tucked it in the back of his scrubs. Then he thanked the medic and returned to charting. I know the particular doctor quite well and don't doubt the story one bit. He preferred Smith magnums and bought a 29 off me once.

Expereinced ER folks have seen many, many guns and knives.

paramedic70002
August 3, 2007, 08:16 AM
I'm thinking you'd be pretty uncomfortable on that backboard with a weapon tucked in your 4 o'clock.

Not a good time to mention having it when the Medic begins his full body hands on survey, or decides to trauma strip you.

When I picked the weapon up, I think I would ave loaded it in front of the property officer, then asked was there really any reason to make me come back tomorrow.

Medics DO steal. Never witnessed it, but read about it occasionally. Usually $$$ and meds, but not out of the realm of possibility, if you're dead or CTD (Circling The Drain) maybe so you can't complain.

MudPuppy
August 3, 2007, 11:04 AM
It all sounds like it went as well as possible, considering everything.

I would write a letter of appreciation. I'd add a polite note asking them to reconsider their policy on not releasing your ammo with the firearm. I mean, you're legal to carry and you just cleared another background check--there's no justification for that that I can think of?

I hope you heal up quickly and completely--glad it wasn't worse!

Thumper
August 3, 2007, 11:15 AM
I'm thinking you'd be pretty uncomfortable on that backboard with a weapon tucked in your 4 o'clock.


The uncomfortable part was the back of my head on the board. The gun was fine. I'd just gotten hit by a friggin' car, and the worst pain was from 45 minutes taped to that board.

I asked them why they didn't have a neoprene pad for the back of the head, and the guy said that they exist, but they get blood soaked. :barf:

BAT1
August 3, 2007, 11:17 AM
Glad your safe, and you telling the personnel tending you about your CC. When they feel safe, everyones happy. They get in wrecks too, the same thing happens. The officer gave you a receipt, so you should get it back. Professionals act professional. Heck that bump my improve your groups! :rolleyes:

The Lone Haranguer
August 3, 2007, 11:54 AM
The deputy and paramedics exhibited real professionalism here. :)

thexrayboy
August 3, 2007, 11:37 PM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.


Nice sentiment but unfortunately many (perhaps most) hospitals do not have a specific policy and procedure in place to deal with weapons and many do not have storage that is adequately secured. Allowing LEO to handle it is be best choice especially if you get a receipt for it.

Walking with a loaded gun around certain areas of a hospital is not a good idea, There has been cases of accidental discharges when people with loaded guns especially the .45 cocked and locked one in the chamber type that have become magnetized and the hammer has dropped on them. This has happened a lot especially with LEO,s walking around sonogram and MRI machines that have very big magnets. There has been evidence of guns being magnetized even for days latter after it has been exposed to magnetic resonance, Owners have found this by guns attracting paper clips ext..


There has been one....Only one, documented incident involving discharge of a firearm in an MRI room. This occurred because the officer who was carrying was also the patient and entered the room prior to being screened for metals and without the permission of the technologist in charge. If said officer had done as instructed the discharge would not have occurred. All MRI rooms and facilities have screening and access controls to prevent unneed and unwanted metals from entering the area. If someone willfully ignores or violates these rules that is when problems occur.

1. Hospital workers will steal everything and anything that is not nailed down, and some things that are. While most of our visits have been few, even when we have gone for outpatient stuff, we are told to send anything of any of value home!


Apparently the hospital you hang out in is located in a crime ridden third world country. In America theft from patients while they are in a hospital is rare and usually involves other patients or visitors. Most hospital workers, especially those who are certified and credentialed are not inclined to risk a job making very good money ( and possible their license) in order to abscond with something that belongs to a patient. The reason patients are told not to bring valuables with them when they come in is that the facility refuses to accept liability for loss from any source. There have been plenty of episodes where patients have claimed to have had expensive valuables stolen and sought reimbursement from hospitals...frequently upon investigation it is found that these persons are con artists merely seeking a fast buck. If you have something go missing while you are a patient at a hospital the most likely culprit will be a non employee. For ER visits property is inventoried, listed and stored for return to the patient on discharge or given to family.
Don't slander a large group of persons without knowing the facts. Healthcare workers on average are better educated, better paid and more honest than many others. The nature of the work draws people who are interested in helping others, not taking advantage of them. People with a self centered criminalistic mindset will not last long in the healthcare field.

paramedic70002
August 4, 2007, 12:37 PM
Also worth mentioning that in Nebraska, you must notify EMS and surrender your weapon to them.

PennsyPlinker
August 4, 2007, 06:15 PM
Apparently the hospital you hang out in is located in a crime ridden third world country.

Yeah, you are right and I am wrong. Apparently all those articles I have read in our local third world newspapers here in PA about hospital workers stealing money, belongings, and that one nurse who was stealing people's LIVES by murdering them was all fiction.

Look. I know there are honest people AND dishonest people everywhere. You might consider that there just might be a small bit of HUMAN NATURE evident in people who work in hospitals. But you have already corrected me, so I am sure no one working anywhere in any hospital would ever do anything untoward or illegal. And once again, someone has taken a statement and RUN WITH IT to the most extreme of the extreme. I am getting to point where I wonder why I come here anymore. I can see why L&P has been shut down. :(

2bigfeet
August 4, 2007, 11:07 PM
Unless there is something prohibiting concealed carry into a hospital in your state I would have simply left it be. It would have been found and secured at the hospital, much easier then having to worry about pulling it out of a evidence locker.

Same thing happened to a friend of a friend here in Connecticut a few months ago. Only he got to the hospital before he told anyone... "hey, don't anyone freakout but I have a CCW and I'm carry a gun". Well a freakout ensued and the locals were called. They confiscated his gun, went to his home a confiscated all his guns from his safe and pulled his permit. Reason... not supposed to carry into a hospital. Of course the technicality was he was carried in on a stretcher. Sorry for him, police chief sees it another way and its his descretion.

Moral of the story... don't get into a wreck in Connecticut. Or least bad enough you have to go to the hospital.

IA_farmboy
August 5, 2007, 02:51 AM
When I picked the weapon up, I think I would ave loaded it in front of the property officer, then asked was there really any reason to make me come back tomorrow.

I would think that loading a weapon in a police station would be hazardous to your health. Their policy on not releasing ammo and weapon on the same day is one dog I'd leave lie. If I was in that situation I might have asked if I could have the empty magazine. Once I have my firearm and the magazine I probably wouldn't bother to return for the ammunition, I'd have to consider if it was worth my time.

What I really want to know is if this would have been handled differently if the LEO didn't know the person. The LEO knew the guy was the son of another LEO. That might have made the LEO make doubly sure all was done correctly. Had the LEO not recognized the guy perhaps he would not have been so quick to hand out a receipt and card.

I understand why they ran a background check before handing the weapon back, it's a CYA maneuver. Think of the lawsuits that would happen if they later found out they gave a weapon to a known felon. Even if the guy had an outstanding parking ticket they might just hold on to the firearm as leverage to get their money.

I'm glad all turned out as well as it did.

Coronach
August 5, 2007, 03:18 AM
2- While the cop was cool about it, I don't understand why your gun was confiscated? It wasn't confiscated, it was placed in the Property Room for safekeeping. You can go get it out later. In the meantime, you know it is safe.

Look at it this way- if you get to the hospital and you suddenly take a turn for the worse and they have to do something to you pronto, do you want your loaded gun floating around unsecured, or in the custody of the local orderly who may know nothing about how to handle guns...or looking to supplement his near-minimum-wage income?

Thank you, no.

Mike

Orthonym
August 5, 2007, 03:38 AM
With what Brad posted above. He used really good language in that sample letter.

Those of y'all who have read my previous writings here may surmise that I am not always an uncritical supporter of everything policemen do, and you people would be right about that.

That's why I think it's very important to let the police department know (in writing) when one of their guys has done something kewl&manly and praiseworthy. Policemen don't get a lot of praise, usually, just a lot of complaining.

We all do better work when we get praised for doing right.

.cheese.
August 5, 2007, 03:43 AM
so is the reason that they can't give back the gun and ammo simultaneously because it would then basically become you CCW'ing in a police station which is prohibited (or at least here it is)?

Or is it some other type of policy?

ZMP_CTR
August 5, 2007, 09:48 AM
JMHO.

I think the OP handled it perfectly. Good job. I love stories of responsible gun owners.

It is too bad that for every good story, you hear ten stories of idiocy.

Owens
August 5, 2007, 09:54 PM
This type of incident and the manner in which subsequent events were handled by all parties are what The High Road is all about. Just more proof of responsible ownership and how it could work if all were to follow the example. Glad you weren't seriously injured. Good Job. Write those letters!

snewbie
August 5, 2007, 10:27 PM
The gun should have been returned with the ammunition without a background check. Those two policies are a slap in the face to every American citizen.

Otherwise, everything went well.

Bazooka Joe71
August 5, 2007, 10:41 PM
The gun should have been returned with the ammunition without a background check. Those two policies are a slap in the face to every American citizen.

Otherwise, everything went well.

While I understand exactly what you're saying, it would be a huge liability if helpless was a felon and they gave him his gun back and committed a crime with it....They're just covering their behinds.

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