I got an interview...


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TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 01:06 PM
A while back I made a post about gun manufacturers in Texas in hopes of applying for an Engineering Co-op position. A few companies were mentioned, one of them being STI International (www.stiguns.com).

Well, in a few weeks I have an appointment set up to meet with them about a potential position. :D

Just wanted to thank you guys for letting me know about this company as I had never heard of them until someone here mentioned it.


Any words of wisdom for a nervous young lad? :D


*EDIT*

UPDATE
Had the interview two weeks ago. I think the interview went well. Spoke with the Director of Operations for a while, then he showed me around the facilities. After the tour, I spent some time in QC and watched the QC Manager do a warranty repair and the process he goes through.

The whole thing was three hours, which was longer than I had expected so I guess that's a good thing. I dropped a thank you letter in the mail and then called them a week after the interview to check up.

Still no word from them. I think the main problem is that there was no job posting, it was me contacting them for the position so they would have to create a position for me. I think they are going to have to figure out whether or not they want to deal with that.

Yes or no, that's fine... I just want to know.

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Heavy Metal Hero
August 2, 2007, 01:10 PM
Keep your ears open and your mouth closed (unless you have a relevant question). Good luck, sounds like an awesome opportunity.

Dannavyret
August 2, 2007, 01:11 PM
Any words of wisdom for a nervous young lad?

1. Posture = show of confidence.

2. Never look away when talking or being talked to.

3. Resist fidgeting, excessive hand gestures.

4. Don't interrupt.

5. Don't answer with nods and head shakes.

6. Question them a lot. but keep questions pointed and brief.

Keep your mind and spirit focused on your desire to become a member of this company and you'll have a good shot at being chosen.

kungfuhippie
August 2, 2007, 01:14 PM
Don't talk with your hands. Many people hate that, find it distracting. Good luck, sounds like a dream job...

strat81
August 2, 2007, 01:48 PM
If you're still in school, contact your career services office. They usually offer resume , cover letter, and interview skill building workshops.

Unless you are told otherwise by the interviewer, WEAR A SUIT. Not jeans, not khakis and a polo, not slacks and a sport coat. A suit. And make sure it fits. It doesn't have to be from Brooks Brothers or something, but wearing a terribly-fitting suit is almost as bad as no suit at all. Make sure it is business appropriate: no "clubbing" suits that are red, purple, etc. Preferably it should be navy blue, grey, or black. Wear a pressed white shirt (iron it before you wear it!) and an unobtrusive tie: no Mickey Mouse ties, no NASCAR ties, no American Flag ties, etc. Make sure you have a dress belt and shoes that match and go with the suit. No brown shoes with a black suit. If your shoes are scuffed, buy some shoe polish for a few dollars and shine them up. If you're unsure about the look you're going for, watch a video of a president giving a speech. Regardless of what their saying, Bush 1, Clinton, Bush 2, even the current candidates pretty much always dress the same. It's a classic look that indicates professionalism.

Personally, for interviews I wear:
-a navy blue 2-piece suit
-a white wrinkle-free broadcloth shirt with no pattern and a point collar
-a white crew-neck undershirt (no "wifebeaters" under a light dress shirt, they're too visible)
-black oxford-style shoes
-black nylon dress socks
-a smooth black dress belt
-a polished steel tie clip

Wearing a suit at an interview is a sign of respect for the company and the position. It tells them you care about your appearance. Your appearance is important because if they hire you, you are an ambassador for that company. If you show up looking like a bum, it indicates you're lazy, don't care about yourself, and don't care about the job.

Buy or borrow a nice portfolio. ALWAYS bring extra copies of your resume. I showed up an interview once that turned out to be a panel interview... luckily I had extra copies to give to those people. In the portfolio, stash those extra resumes along with your references. Make sure you have a pad or paper in there along with a TWO writing instruments (I bring a nice pen and a mechanical pencil). Spend the $2 at the drug store on a decent pen that doesn't look like a 10 cent BIC.
Ask questions:
-Why is this position vacant?
-Why did that person leave this position?-Where does the company see itself in five years?
-What growth opportunities exist for this position?
-Who will I be working with?
-What is the corporate culture like?
-What is the policy on overtime?
-Are there any busy seasons?-Is there any travel involved in the position?
-What are the 3 best things about working for the company?
-What are some things you think the company should change about itself?
-When do you plan on making a decision about this position?
If they ask you about salary, ask them "How much has been budgeted for this position?"
-What is the benefit package like?
-Does the company have any "outside the office activities" like a softball team, charity drive, community service program, etc.?

Show up early. Smile at everyone. Don't click your pen. Shake everyone's hand that you are introduced to (no death-grip handshakes either).

And lastly... SEND A THANK-YOU NOTE. Have one pre-written so you only have to make minimal changes. Mail it the same day as your interview.

Good luck!!!!

armedandsafe
August 2, 2007, 01:53 PM
Do the research on what the company does AND what the company is. Talk to people who work there and get a feel for how they view the people they work around and with. If you can answer questions about what you can bring to the company that they will be willing to pay for, it should include not just the mechanical skills you have, but the "people" skills you have. Interviewers are not just looking for machines to do a job, but for people who will make the company grow comfortably, as well as profitably.

I know, that sounds lile a lot of feel-good gobbledy-gook. However, you are going to be interviewed by a human being, and the interviewer's comfort level is important to the decision that he/she will make in hiring you.

Pops

Houston Tom
August 2, 2007, 01:56 PM
Good luck

there is some great advice here I would just add a couple of things.

THink about answers to possible questions you might be asked like

what are your strongest skills; your weakest?
what are you looking for in a job
do as much research on the compnay as possible and the people at the company, may prove useful

if itis a board interview when asked a question, begin your answer looking at the person that asked it but as you answer look at the others as well.

jamie.27203
August 2, 2007, 01:56 PM
One thing that was pointed out to me by a job recruiter, be polite to everyone. He said, and I have witnessed, that alot of times the interveiwer will go back to the receptionist after the interview to see how you were when not in the interview. You are being interviewed from the time you pull into the parking lot until the time you leave it. +1 on the thank you note, I am almost certain that this is what put me above the other candidate in the job I have now.

TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 01:58 PM
Thanks for the input thus far guys, especially strat. :D

MattB000
August 2, 2007, 02:29 PM
Obvously you are excited to work for this company. MAKE SURE THEY KNOW THAT!! Even if it sounds stupid or cheesy tell them how much you want this. For an entry level position they will be asking themselves these types of questions.

Do I like this person? Would I want to work with them?
Are they willing to learn? Are they easy to teach? Are they capable of learning the skills we plan to teach them?

Also, if an opportunity arises to where you can be helpful during the interview, jump on it! (For instance, if someone drops something, immediately pick it up for them)

Yosemite**Sam
August 2, 2007, 02:40 PM
Go out and buy some new underwear and wear it the day of the interview. There's something about new underwear that just makes you feel good.

MrBorland
August 2, 2007, 03:15 PM
All great advice. Dress and act professionally, and do your research beforehand. I only have 1 other thing to add: Remove the word "like" from your vocabulary if you're one of the many who seem to use it in every sentence ("this place is like so awesome"). Keep this habit, and you'll always be seen as a pimply teenager rather than a talented potential colleague. It's a tough habit to break - many do it, most don't realize it, and none realize (important) others notice. Sounds petty, but it's part of acting professionally, rather than sounding like a kid.

Good luck!

TX1911fan
August 2, 2007, 04:27 PM
+1 on the secretary/receptionist comments. If you have a female escorting you through the building, still be a gentleman and open doors, allow her to go through first, etc. Basic manners are important. If they take you out to lunch, order something that you will eat with a fork, not with your hands, even if it is just a salad. Don't order something that will be messy or hard to chew, or will be distracting.

Eye contact is key, and if you find something of common interest, develop it. Be engaging, pleasant, upbeat, but don't overdo it. Try not to be too loud and don't be too fake.

StopTheGrays
August 2, 2007, 04:28 PM
Make sure your palms stay warm and dry. Shaking hands with a person with clammy palms is like grabbing a damp rag.

waterhouse
August 2, 2007, 04:32 PM
I the interview at the Geogetown location or are you meeting them somewhere else? If it's at Georgetown they'll probably give you a nice tour. . .pretty neat facility.

Good luck with the interview.

TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 06:07 PM
I the interview at the Geogetown location or are you meeting them somewhere else? If it's at Georgetown they'll probably give you a nice tour. . .pretty neat facility.

Good luck with the interview.

It's at the Georgetown facility... do they have any other facilities(I honestly don't know)?

Thanks again for all the input, guys. Keep it coming!

Thefabulousfink
August 2, 2007, 06:48 PM
The most important thing to bring to an interview is confidence.

Remember: you don't need this job, they need you for this job.

If you can convince yourself of that, then you stand a good chance of convincing them. Good luck with the interview, I love my STI Spartan.

Ithaca37
August 2, 2007, 08:54 PM
Damn you, that is exactly what I want for next summer (had to take classes this summer).

Seriously though, that is awesome. Good luck at the interview.

One question: What is your major? Are you an ME?

TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 09:05 PM
Damn you, that is exactly what I want for next summer (had to take classes this summer).

Seriously though, that is awesome. Good luck at the interview.

One question: What is your major? Are you an ME?

Well, I don't want this to be just a summer job...

And yes, I'm an ME major. I have about 5 months left of school total.

stangfan93
August 2, 2007, 09:41 PM
I use to be in a business class in high school and we had a person come and speak to us about interviews and one the many things that he told my class that has always stuck with me was to keep them talking. The longer they talk the less you talk and the less chances of you making a mistake when you talk. I have a tendency to get tongue tied so that helps me out a lot.

Ask them how they got to the position that they are in how long they have been working for the company and their general history. The person doing the interview then becomes interviewed. Also do not always focus on the person themselves but about the company.

Where i work now i did the same thing and it help me from saying the wrong things or getting tongue tied like i usually do when i get excited or nervous. When I went into the small conference room that I was being interviewed at there were 6 people sitting there with my resume. I was pretty nervous because this has never happened to me.

Ithaca37
August 2, 2007, 09:46 PM
I see. Makes sense if you are almost done.

I assume you go to Kettering?

TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 10:02 PM
I see. Makes sense if you are almost done.

I assume you go to Kettering?

Sure do... almost done and can't wait to be.

RPCVYemen
August 2, 2007, 11:25 PM
Personally, for interviews I wear:
-a navy blue 2-piece suit
-a white wrinkle-free broadcloth shirt with no pattern and a point collar
-a white crew-neck undershirt (no "wifebeaters" under a light dress shirt, they're too visible)
-black oxford-style shoes
-black nylon dress socks
-a smooth black dress belt
-a polished steel tie clip

Man, none of you guys must do software. :) If I wear socks to to work, my manager assumes I must be interviewing somewhere else!

Seriously, good luck. Where I work, a huge percentage of our permanent employees come from our interns.

Mike

Catsailor
August 2, 2007, 11:44 PM
All very good advise for anyone interviewing for a position. I can only emphasize confidence, professionalism and the interview begins when you arrive on the property and does not end until you are off the property (everything you do there will leave some sort of impression).
Good luck

Fburgtx
August 2, 2007, 11:58 PM
Good luck!!

Most of all, be nice and smile!!! No earrings, tattoos, or funky/spiky/gelled-up hair. No cologne. Don't be a know-it-all, but make sure they know that you know/enjoy firearms. Don't argue and be positive!!! Most folks can be trained to do their job, but they can't be taught/trained to have a good attitude!!

We're all rootin' for you!!

P.S. Good advice from Mustangfan93. Keep THEM talking. Don't make stupid small-talk, but if you find out they have a hobby you know lots about, ask them questions about it if you run out of job questions. People LOVE to talk about themselves. I once had an interview where one guy was a big Bob Wills fan and the other liked to collect old pocket auto pistols and talked it up with them(I nailed that interview and got the position).

Tim13
August 3, 2007, 12:08 AM
"It's at the Georgetown facility... do they have any other facilities(I honestly don't know)?"

Learn everything that you can about the company. How many plants/factories they have, who's the CEO, what were their earnings, are they publicly traded, how large is their work force? By demonstrating to a potential employer that you've done your homework about their company, and still applied for a job there, you are telling them just how much you want to work there.

gunsmith
August 3, 2007, 12:10 AM
Have a shot or two of some good whiskey, and chew some gum during the interview so they don't smell it.

Also do not shave or shower for two days before the interview, as a day or two growth of a beard is really manly looking and if you shower you lose valuable
pheremones.

This advice has got me where I am today!...now...do you want fries with that?:evil:

Fburgtx
August 3, 2007, 12:14 AM
To address another question,
In regards to other facilities, they are importing a few guns now to sell at cheaper prices (see STI Spartan). Don't know if they import from the Phillipines or what. You might also ask about their purchase of Lone Star Armaments (Stephenville, TX) a while back. Study the STI website, too!!

waterhouse
August 3, 2007, 12:22 AM
I think their only U.S. plant is in Georgetown (about 20 minutes north of Austin). The company is great, they very much support competition shooting and seem to be getting into cowboy shooting with the new Texican.

They seem like great folk . . . I've gone to pick up orders at the factory and everyone there, from the secretaries to the top dog, are cordial and seem into shooting. I don't do much of the "gun games" stuff, but I have customers who do and they all talk highly of STI . . . company reps showing up at matches and such and always promoting the sport.

If you want to grab a beer or go shooting while you are in town send me an email, and again, good luck. The Austin area can always use a few more shooters.

joplinsks
August 3, 2007, 01:01 AM
The two most important pointers for an interview are:

1) Be positive about EVERYTHING. Don't talk negative about former jobs, supervisors, etc. Interviewers will ALWAYS side with other employers and talking negative, even when you don't realize it, will label you as a troublemaker with no future. That's why it's always best to practice and prepare well for interviews, especially if your employment history has faults. Even if you have numerous degrees and excellent qualifications, you'll still be asked why you left prior jobs and those answers will play greatly in their decision.

2) Know something about the company. Always helps to break the ice if you and the interviewer have something in common. It's very impressive if you can discuss knowing a well liked former or current employee or explain any previous dealings you have had with the company. Companies like hiring folks who are like one of the family from the start.

TexKettering
August 3, 2007, 01:08 AM
I'm seriously impressed. Thanks for all the great input.. you've all eased my nerves and made me feel better already.

I hope to nail this thing and I will be sure to keep you guys posted. :D

JimmyG
August 3, 2007, 01:21 AM
1. Know your subject matter. Be affable yet mostly quiet, speak when spoken to, and look the peeps in the eye whilst giving your answers in an honest manner. No fidget, no fiddle, no fear. If you belong, believe it more than any other thing and then they will too.

2. Dress well. Go to a men's clothing store where you'll find sharp women who adore sharp men. Tell her, ask her, and let her adorn you. After you get the job, ask her out, even if she's twenty years your senior. Oops, I digress...

Eyesac
August 3, 2007, 01:29 PM
Good luck! Hope it works out for ya!

ozwyn
August 3, 2007, 01:39 PM
1. eye contact. Look the interviewer in the eye and stay focused

2. show some enegry and enthusiasm. NOT spazzing, but find something to be excited about and show a eagerness to do the work, even the crappy parts of it.

Correia
August 3, 2007, 03:14 PM
If you want to get a feel for STI, go over to their webpage and read all of the Skinnergrams. That is the boss' blog. It will give you a feel for how they think.

I've worked with STI a lot over the last two years. They are actually my single favorite gun company to deal with. They're a bunch of fun people who love guns.

TexKettering
August 3, 2007, 03:16 PM
If you want to get a feel for STI, go over to their webpage and read all of the Skinnergrams. That is the boss' blog. It will give you a feel for how they think.

I've worked with STI a lot over the last two years. They are actually my single favorite gun company to deal with. They're a bunch of fun people who love guns.


I have read a few of the blogs, but I'll see to read up on more of them.

What do you do, out of curiousity?

Plain Old Bill
August 3, 2007, 03:25 PM
Been interviewing for...well, for a LONG time. It's a large part of what I do as a Director of HR.

1. Be yourself- smile, be self-depreciating in small talk, and be yourself.
2. If you're nervous, say so. You're probably not the only one in the room who is!
3. Dress nicely and act like you do it every day!
4. Someone already said it- BE POSITIVE! the last thing in the world an interviewer wants to hear is how bad things went at your last job, class, life....or how this is your last best remaining option.
5. Make it clear that you'd trample the living and hurdle the dead for this job.
6. reserve the salary and benefit questions for later....don't worry, they'll get to them soon, maybe in the next round of interviews.
7. Keep us posted on how it goes!!!!!

GOOD LUCK!

Correia
August 3, 2007, 03:26 PM
What do you do, out of curiousity? I own a gunstore. FBMG is the largest STI dealer in Utah. I've dealt with STI a lot, and I couldn't ask for a better bunch of people.

Houston Tom
August 3, 2007, 03:27 PM
if they are a publicly traded company then they have to post the numbers read em, Of course check their website. Trade associations may also have information on the company as well.

MP5
August 3, 2007, 04:00 PM
One thing that very clearly helped me land my current job was letting the interviewer understand that I took the time to research the company and wasn't there just because the position was available.

Turn questions with potentially negative answers into things that can reflect positively on your motivation, self-awareness, etc.: you might get questions like "Why did you leave your last job?", "What did you like least about your last job", etc. Do not give into the temptation to bitch and moan about any past experiences or bosses. Don't go on about "me, me, me" and what you want, but ask questions and give answers that lead the discussion towards the company and how you can contribute to it.

I agree with the above posters who emphasize dressing and acting like a proper gentleman and listening carefully and answering to the point instead of just talking randomly because you're nervous. Sincere smiles can also take you far in life, if not in every interview. Employers need people with more than just a skill set or degree, but with the ability to mesh with existing employees.

Waitone
August 3, 2007, 08:20 PM
Be polite to everyone you meet. Everyone. Secretaries, co-workers, other co-op types, and especially the rumpled up bald-headed dude who just happens to show up about lunch time. The last one may well be the one who makes the final decision.

Run to Kinko's and print up a business card containing relevant contact information. Reason for the card is that it facilitates the exchange of information and let's you see who you are talking to. For whatever the reason you offering your business card will put the onerous on the other guy to provide you with their business card. That way you don't have to remember a fist full of people. Then immediately after getting to your computer you can write thank you notes to everyone you spoke with. Three lines max and in each case ask for the position. Email rules.

Good luck!

goings_51
August 3, 2007, 09:24 PM
I can't believe only one person has really hit on one of the most important things...know everything you can about the company!

I took a grad school class on business communication, but the main theme was that you can't be overprepaired. Our main project that lasted the whole semester was to prepare for an interview with an employer of our choosing. By the end of that semester I had compressed hundreds of pages of information into a few pages of bullets. I probably knew as much about the company as my interviewer who had worked there 20 years when I did it for real. This prof. went so far as to have us book interview rooms in the Business Center and do full dress rehersals. He also had lots of contacts so occasionally someone would show up for a rehearsal with a classmate and find either the proffessor or a manager from the company the student was interested in sitting accross the table. (BTW - this guy is now one of the youngest presidents ever of a public university in Texas)

You need to get detailed. Why did they switch from Fedex to DHL last year? Do they think the upcoming election cycle will help them reach their goal of selling XXXX units/month by December? Have increasing commidity prices played a major role in their business strategy, or are most of their costs from design and labor? Etc. If you do this, you will stand out from all the other yahoos that go into an interview asking about parking or what the cafeteria serves.

I reduced the job market to statistics when I graduated. At that time the average was something like 100 resumes = 1 interview. 5 interviews = 1 job.

I sent two resumes and had one interview. The 2nd resume also offered an interview, but I already had a job. When I got ready for my 2nd job after school, I sent one resume. This system works.

PS +1 on all of the nice suit, clean shave, etc. advise - but that should just be assumed.

Edit - +1 on everything Waitone said too.

TexKettering
August 3, 2007, 09:28 PM
goings 51 said
PS +1 on all of the nice suit, clean shave, etc. advise - but that should just be assumed.


Heh, I agree with you there. I knew that much, but have not had a formal interview yet. The other jobs I've gotten have had pretty informal interviews since I knew people at those places.

Thanks for the information all. :D

And a hello to a fellow San Antonian.

GigaBuist
August 3, 2007, 09:39 PM
Make sure you have a dress belt and shoes that match and go with the suit.... and for the love of God make sure your holster matches the belt!

:D

I'd give you advice but I stink at interviews. I undersell myself by a long shot, and I've been told that by people who've hired me in spite of a poor interview. Being humble is a good trait, but apparently it's not a very good one when you're interviewing.

Hawk
August 3, 2007, 09:45 PM
STI is on fire. I hope they don't grow too fast, but they surely have use for talented individuals.

From SkinnerGram 100 dated 08/03/07:

Thanks to the "guys (and gals) in the back", it’s getting better quickly! Those folks are bustin’ butt for you and had turned out more guns at the end of July than were produced for ALL of 2005. At the current rate, complete firearm output for 2007 should be approximately 65% over 2006. Pretty damn good! Some of your orders should soon start completing ahead of our promised dates and I believe that we can start quoting 14-15 weeks right now.


65% hunh? I'd like to know what agencies in what countries are ponying up for the tact series as well...

Good luck!
Looks like a rising star.

Sir Aardvark
August 4, 2007, 12:28 AM
Here's something that works good in interviews I've had.

After they are done asking you all of their questions, ask them one or two of your own, such as "What incentives does your company have in place to allow your employees to succeed?" - of course, make sure it is intelligent and on topic for your situation.

MudPuppy
August 4, 2007, 12:35 AM
Some good advice here, a couple of things I'd add.

Have a copy (or two) of your resume with you.
Send a follow thank you card--that can set you apart


Good luck, we need as many gun guys as we can get in this liberal holdout!

Robert Hairless
August 4, 2007, 01:15 AM
[Double post removed. My apology for any annoyance substituted.]

Rexster
August 4, 2007, 01:25 AM
Be confident, but don't act so confident you appear cocky. Be polite to the lowliest person you meet; the exec may indeed ask the receptionist or cleaning lady if you were polite to them. Balance confidence with humility! Do not drive like a maniac while on your way, lest the person you cut off in traffic turn out to be the one conducting the interview. If you are invited to eat, taste your food BEFORE you put salt on it. The DFW area is where the South phases into the West, and both places value politeness and manners, yet value confidence in a man. Good luck!

Robert Hairless
August 4, 2007, 01:25 AM
Some of the best career managagement (job hunting and related matters) guidance for a very long time is from Martin Yate, author of the "Knock Them Dead" series on the subject. Your message led me to check the web for Martin's latest activities and I discovered that he also has a web site: KnockemDead.com (http://www.knockemdead.com/interviews.php). I've linked to the menu of his advice on interviews. Do take a look and consider what he says seriously. Martin knows what he is doing and does it well.

strambo
August 4, 2007, 01:39 AM
Think of a good answer for these questions: What is/are your strengths? What is your weakness? Esp. the weakness one. Think of an honest one and be prepared to discuss what you are doing to remedy it. Don't say a lame fake weakness that is a positive in disguise like "My weakness is I'm too nice":barf:.

I just wore a suit to a check the box interview (he all but said I was hired, just crossing the "T"s) at a Ballys gym for a personal trainer position. The interviewer (in shorts/T-shirt:D ) was surprised I wore a suit. I told him that I figured suits are for interviews...and I have suits, so I might a well wear them! If he had said don't bother with a suit or anything on the phone, I wouldn't have though. When in doubt...go with a conservative suit, white shirt as outlined above in the other post.

Prince Yamato
August 4, 2007, 01:41 AM
1) wear a nice suit and make sure your belt matches your shoes (brown belt w/ brown shoes, black belt w/ black shoes)

2) Smile and make sure you THINK positive. Always have a positive thought in your head. People can "read" your emotions. Even if you grandma dies crashing your Hemi-Cuda the morning of the interview, THINK HAPPY THOUGHTS.

3) Do NOT swear. Even if you get chummy with the interviewer, DO NOT SWEAR.

4) Do NOT talk politics or religion. Even if you THINK the interviewer has the same views as you. No complaining about Mexicans, Muslims, Bush, the Berlin wall or who and whatever. You never know who is what religion or has who in their family.

230RN
August 4, 2007, 06:33 AM
Look over their catalog thoroughly. One thing I noticed was they described their guns as being machined to tenths.*

I used that term a couple of years ago on one post, and was challenged on it by a contentious poster who said he'd never heard of that usage --somehow leaving the impression that I didn't know what I was talking about.

But we had always used it in our shop, where it was assumed that a tenth was 0.0001 inches.

So after being challenged on it, I kind of thought that maybe our plant's use of that term was just local/regional to our machine shop.

But I'm glad to see that other outfits use that term.

Soooo.....upshot = you might have your work cut out for you if they routinely run things to "tenths."

Soooo....when you interview, think: precision!

And you might want to re-familiarize yourself with CNC techniques.


Also, they seem to have a lot of variations on basic models, frames, etc.

This implies that if they have any kind of high volume production (as opposed to a onesy-twosy operation), they might need someone who can schedule the production line (and keep in inventory the components) to meet varying demands for variations of a basic line according to demand.

Like in an automotive production line --this one needs an automatic transmission and an ashtray with blue paint, that one needs a manual and no ashtray and black paint.

After all, that's part of engineering as well.

And they might be more interested in that than the admirable gloss on your shoes.

--------
* See their Texican model, for example.

AlaskaErik
August 4, 2007, 06:16 PM
Personally, for interviews I wear:
-a navy blue 2-piece suit
-a white wrinkle-free broadcloth shirt with no pattern and a point collar
-a white crew-neck undershirt (no "wifebeaters" under a light dress shirt, they're too visible)
-black oxford-style shoes
-black nylon dress socks
-a smooth black dress belt
-a polished steel tie clip


Also, make sure your tie is fairly conservative and properly tied. Use a double windsor knot and ensure that the middle of the "Vee" is even with the top of your belt. With a navy suit, I always wore navy colored socks. But most importantly, make sure your carry weapon doesn't print!

RPCVYemen
August 4, 2007, 06:56 PM
You are applying for a technical job, you're an ME, right.

Actually, as an old engineer, I wouldn't sweat the dress too much. Neat but casual is fine.

I interview a lot of folks, and all we really care about is their technical skills and communication skills. My company has been growing recently, and I have probably interviewed 40 folks since January.

All the dress for success is for the business admin types that don't have technical skills. :) If you're business major, whoever has the prettiest tie and the shiniest shoes may make a difference.

If you are applying for a technical job, all they really care about is whether or not you can do the job. I don't really care if someone is a "gentlemen" or any of that crap - and I am pretty sure that I couldn't tell a sociopath from Mother Theresa in an hour interview. I can't even imagine noticing what someone wore, much less being concerned about it.

Be prepared to talk about any technical work you have done. Be prepared to talk about projects, etc. with people who may not know anything about your project.

One think people pay very close attention to is any team dynamics on any projects you've worked on. Don't whine about being stuck with a loser on your team. If you had someone on your team who was difficult to work with, then emphasize how you solved that issue. Emphasize your contributions to the team, but don't make yourself sounds like the Superman. "I was a strong member of a good team!" sounds a lot better than "They all sucked and I saved the day!"

They will mainly be there to assess your technical skills and your ability to work on a team of engineers.

Expect them to ask you some challenging thought questions - design, etc. You will sweat, and you will be nervous, but what they will want to see is how you think.

Mike

boredelmo
September 2, 2007, 06:28 PM
so how'd it go?!

Cougfan2
September 2, 2007, 06:44 PM
This may seem like stating the obvious, but ASK FOR THE JOB! I have been on several interview panels where the prospective candidate walked out the door and never asked for the job. Be prepared to answer the question "Why should we hire you?". I have also asked companies "Why should I want to work for you".

Good luck!:)

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 12:01 PM
Sorry, I meant to reply to this earlier boredelmo.

Had the interview two weeks ago. I think the interview went well. Spoke with the Director of Operations for a while, then he showed me around the facilities. After the tour, I spent some time in QC and watched the QC Manager do a warranty repair and the process he goes through.

The whole thing was three hours, which was longer than I had expected so I guess that's a good thing. I dropped a thank you letter in the mail and then called them a week after the interview to check up.

Still no word from them. I think the main problem is that there was no job posting, it was me contacting them for the position so they would have to create a position for me. I think they are going to have to figure out whether or not they want to deal with that.

Yes or no, that's fine... I just want to know. :(

jlbraun
September 6, 2007, 12:06 PM
Two pieces of advice:
Be on your toes. Given that it's an engineering position, a lot of companies will give you a "dogpile" technical interview to see how you do under pressure. The object is not to answer everything correctly, it's to be cool under pressure.

Bring a portfolio of previous designs you have done if they're not under an NDA to someone else.

AirForceShooter
September 6, 2007, 12:06 PM
after the interview ASK for the job.
Flat out "I want to work here!!!"

AFS
CFO retired

Claude Clay
September 6, 2007, 12:18 PM
are they publically or privatly owned? do research b4 the interview as if you were interested in purchasing their stock. this will help you to ask some 'interesting' questions outside & beyound those connected to your specific job criteria. plus all of the above.

RPCVYemen
September 6, 2007, 12:31 PM
Still no word from them. I think the main problem is that there was no job posting, it was me contacting them for the position so they would have to create a position for me. I think they are going to have to figure out whether or not they want to deal with that.

Don't fret.

What may not be clear to you is how incredibly cheap you are for them as a co-op.

At least most tech companies use them extensively (we call them "lab rats") because they are so much cheaper than full-time salaried employees. We can hire a co-op, pay him $25/hour, and that's still probably 25-30% of what it would cost to hire a salaried employee. It's a good deal. For a college student, $25/hour is a lot of money, but for the company, it's dirt cheap.

We can almost always create a co-op position for a qualified candidate.

Mike

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 12:31 PM
STI is owned by the employees.

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 12:32 PM
Don't fret.

What may not be clear to you is how incredibly cheap you are for them as a co-op.

At least most tech companies use them extensively (we call them "lab rats") because they are so much cheaper than full-time salaried employees. We can hire a co-op, pay him $25/hour, and that's still probably 25-30% of what it would cost to hire a salaried employee. It's a good deal. For a college student, $25/hour is a lot of money, but for the company, it's dirt cheap.

We can almost always create a co-op position for a qualified candidate.

Mike

I think that's another issue. I put the average pay that a senior at my school makes at a company that size, $16/hour. He seemed to think that was a bit steep. :-/

CountGlockula
September 6, 2007, 12:39 PM
Good luck TexKettering!

Give them a few more days to respond, and then follow up. Be polite and show them that you're eager for the position.

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 12:42 PM
Thanks for the edit. :D

Wheeler44
September 6, 2007, 12:59 PM
I interview candidates for the company where I work. The one thing that really turns me off is B...S.... As my Step-dad told me " you don't have to know everything, just know where to look everything up"

RPCVYemen
September 6, 2007, 01:42 PM
I think that's another issue. I put the average pay that a senior at my school makes at a company that size, $16/hour. He seemed to think that was a bit steep. :-/

Wow - things must be very different outside the tech world! (I went from Peace Corps to the tech world, so I don't know much about what other professional jobs pay.)

I worked as co-op for IBM in the early 90s at $17.50 an hour, and most people thought I under-priced myself. I was in grad school, but that was 15 years ago. I am pretty sure we offer undergrads who are still wet behind the ears $25/hour.

At any rate, $16/hour without benefits has to be very cheap labor for them. If they offer any benefits, a minimum wage worker probably costs them that much.

I guess I should be grateful for my geek genes. If I could only dance ... :)

Mike

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 01:45 PM
Any need for co-ops at your company? :D

RPCVYemen
September 6, 2007, 01:50 PM
Any need for co-ops at your company?

My guess is that playing with guns is a lot more fun than staring at code until you get old and fat and start drooling on the keyboard. :)

Mike

strat81
September 6, 2007, 01:50 PM
are they publically or privatly owned?
The only publicly traded firearm companies are Smith & Wesson and Sturm, Ruger.

TexKettering
September 6, 2007, 01:51 PM
My guess is that playing with guns is a lot more fun than staring at code until you get old and fat and start drooling on the keyboard.

Mike

Yeah, but at this point I really need to get a co-op (required for graduation!)... which is why I just want STI to make a decision.

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