Movie question: "Heat"


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Monkeyleg
August 2, 2007, 07:12 PM
Last night I watched a bit of the movie "Heat" for the 300th time.

After the armored car robbery, one of the detectives says that it looked like one of the guards was going for his "hidout piece."

Here in WI, armed guards cannot carry concealed. Is the law different in CA, or was the script writer just taking some liberties?

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TexKettering
August 2, 2007, 07:14 PM
Most likely taking some liberty, would be my guess...

TexasRifleman
August 2, 2007, 07:32 PM
Legal or not, I certainly wouldn't do that job without a "hideout piece".

I don't know for certain but I'd assume many guards carry quietly even in places it's illegal.

Wouldn't you?

Trebor
August 2, 2007, 09:51 PM
It's legal for a guard to carry concealed in Michigan, if he has a Concealed Pistol License. Actually, having a CPL is a requirement for an armed guard in Michigan, otherwise he wouldn't be able to have the gun in the truck.

Don't assume that California law is the same as Wisconsin law.

FourNineFoxtrot
August 2, 2007, 10:10 PM
I went through a security class last year in CA. I asked that very same question, "Can I carry a hideout piece?", and I was told, very emphatically, "NO, only cops can do that. NOT CCW holders OR Exposed Weapon Permit holders."

However, it should be noted that "Heat" was made in the mid-nineties. In California, the BSIS (Bureau of Security and Investigative Services) has revamped their licensing system and training requirements in the last few years. It's quite possible that, at the time of the movie, a hideout piece WAS legal.

Legal or not, I wouldn't put it past armored car drivers/riders to carry a hideout. They already have access to things that most Patrol Security would never be allowed, like shotguns (mostly at the garage, but maybe in the truck), and I've heard stories about them carrying SMGs, although I've never seen that. I tried to get into the business once with a local outfit, but they never even had the courtesy to call and say, "Sorry, but no."

GunTech
August 3, 2007, 02:22 AM
It's not a 'hideout piece', it's a backup. :)

Caimlas
August 3, 2007, 02:40 AM
What in the world is a 'hideout piece'? I'd assumed it was just a leg-strapped or otherwise deep-concealment firearm, but some of the comments here with regard to CA law have me wondering otherwise.

Monkeyleg
August 3, 2007, 07:02 PM
GunTech, I could swear the detective in the movie used the term "hideout piece." He also mentioned ankle holster.

As for a security job, one of our volunteers has a job repairing ATM machines. Since he works in every part of the city, including the worst, cops have advised him to carry concealed.

Noxx
August 3, 2007, 07:48 PM
While I'm not aware of the legality, I do know a pair of armored car guards who carry concealed in addition to their standard sidearm here in CA.

usmarine0352_2005
August 3, 2007, 07:53 PM
GunTech, I could swear the detective in the movie used the term "hideout piece." He also mentioned ankle holster.

Slang for "Back Up Weapon":

Hideout, Holdout, etc, etc.

;)

jojosdad
August 3, 2007, 07:57 PM
Er - I live in California and my CCW allows me to carry up to four handguns. There is nothing in CA CCW law about which one is to be my primary carry and which is back up.
Maybe FourNineFoxtrot's instructor in his guard class was referring to something else.

Rexster
August 4, 2007, 02:13 AM
Guys, a "hideout" or "hideout piece" or "hideout gun" is indeed what we today call a BUG, a back-up gun, and more descriptive than backup gun. My Remington 870P is a backup gun. My 4" GP100 is a backup gun. My SP101 is a hideout gun, and also a backup gun. Edited to add: Some of the questions I see here make me feel old, and I am not yet 50! Been wearing a badge for almost 24 years.

armoredman
August 4, 2007, 02:40 AM
When I worked armored, at the first company, Wells Fargo Armored Service Corp, my backup was a Taurus 85 in a belly band, under the "raid" vest we had to wear. When I worked the second company, I had two back ups, first a CZ-70 .32 in a vest holster, later a Keltec 9mm in a vest holster. We had to have CCWs to carry, and the company said a backup was just fine, unlike Wells Fargo, who did not, AND required us to carry only 158gr LRN in our issued Smith Model 64s. Very few people, myself included, followed that rule.
AT allowed many things, and issued very cool long guns for out of town runs. During Cristmas, we carried extra firepower visibly, AKs and ARs hanging inside the truck, to discourage wanabees. It worked.

Glockman17366
August 4, 2007, 07:13 AM
Jeeez...it's just a movie!

FourNineFoxtrot
August 4, 2007, 08:43 AM
jojosdad said:

Maybe FourNineFoxtrot's instructor in his guard class was referring to something else.

My instructor was referring to exposed weapon permits and CCWs in the state of California. He quite specifically said that, in either case, one is allowed to carry only one gun and one gun only at any given time, although one may be licensed to carry more than one type of gun (or more than one gun of a single type). For instance, one might have a Glock 19, a Smith & Wesson J frame, and a 1911 all on one CCW, but one may have only one of these on his person, out in public.

Now, it's quite possible that this guy was lying through his teeth, or just plain wrong. Despite the school's accreditation, I have grave doubts about some of the information they gave me. Some things seemed on the level. Many things were no more than common sense. And some things had that pungent aroma peculiar to the malodorous substance excreted from the posterior of the male bovine. In any case, that is what I was taught.

This talk of carrying multiple weapons has, however, piqued my curiosity... I'll see what I can find out from local law enforcement, and other sources.

Ballistic308
August 4, 2007, 08:16 PM
Howdy All,

Used to do that job in the Phoenix metro area, and while my CO. at the time discouraged the practice of carrying a "hideout" gun, it never stopped
any of us from having plenty around. As long as it was in compliance with
CCW laws in AZ, it was OUR business.
"HEAT" takes place in CA, and having taken the course for carrying concealed in that state, they tell you, up front, that you won't get one unless you are deemed to "have reason for it". That does not include
mere "peasants" that work in the armored industry. Had the guard in the movie lived, he would most likely been prosecuted for carrying concealed.

Cannonball888
August 4, 2007, 08:19 PM
After the armored car robbery, one of the detectives says that it looked like one of the guards was going for his "hidout piece."
Really? I thought he said cod peice.

The King of Pants
August 4, 2007, 09:05 PM
Just pulled up the scene, he doesn't say "hideout," It's a holdout piece. I'm pretty sure that's the correct term for a last resort, ankle holstered weapon. And many AC guards carry them legal or not.

Shadow1198
August 4, 2007, 10:38 PM
This is completely unrelated to the original subject, though it is in regards to the movie Heat so, sorry to get a bit OT but I found this interesting. I was watching my director's cut/special edition yesterday and watched the "making of" featurettes. Apparently during the making, the team in charge of the audio effects came up with the typical dubbed gunfire, though they did try to alter it to make it sound a bit better than the average movie. Upon hearing how unrealistic it was, Michael Mann made them scrap everything and insert the actual live fire blank/squib stuff as, of course, it had a much more realistic sound. All I have to say is Michael Mann rules because Heat has the absolute most realistic weapon sounds I've heard in any movie I can recall ;)

MrCleanOK
August 5, 2007, 02:20 AM
Posted to wrong thread. Oops!

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