Questions for .45ACP loads.


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gaudio5
August 4, 2007, 02:28 AM
ok im at a stand still here, couple questions before i go any farther.

is it ok to use the same WEIGHT bullet in a load that calles for a diffrent shape? such as..........7.1grn 200gr JHP win 300 LPP can i make that JHP a jacketed 200gr round nose?

also....

Primers......is a LPP a LPP or do i have to use diffrent primers in diffrent loads? the only loads i have worked up have been BY THE BOOK. just wondering if i can wonder off a bit.


thanks
Gaudio5

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Snapping Twig
August 4, 2007, 02:43 AM
It's all about the weight of the projectile, not the shape. There are some additional issues about jacket vs. cast, but not real earth-shattering stuff.

Always work up your loads cautiously and stay away from maximum loads until you are comfortable with the process.

I'd also advise you to have several reloading sources (manuals) to compare load data and keep a record of what you've done and mark the loads so you don't mix them. You'll find a pearl or two that work well and having them easily identified will make your job a lot easier.

Good luck and keep loading. :)

joneb
August 4, 2007, 03:56 AM
s it ok to use the same WEIGHT bullet in a load that calles for a diffrent shape? such as..........7.1grn 200gr JHP win 300 LPP can i make that JHP a jacketed 200gr round nose?
No. Given the same weight, different bullet configurations may change the load density. Also not all bullets share the same lead hardness, and there may be a difference in the copper jacket thickness. Try to find load data for "the bullet" you are loading, and start with the starting charge. There are times when I am familiar with the components and jump the start a bit :o Different bullets of the same weight with a equal charge can produce various pressures.

Primers......is a LPP a LPP or do i have to use diffrent primers in diffrent loads? the only loads i have worked up have been BY THE BOOK. just wondering if i can wonder off a bit.
No, not all primers are created equal, if I am working load data with a different primer I back off of my starting charge.

JDGray
August 4, 2007, 09:10 AM
I reload at starting load data, really don't effect me, but if your pushing for max loads, it matters. I use Winchester primers, and the WLP are rated as magnum or standard, their must be something different about them. I like to load long, also, kinda like cheap insurance.

dmftoy1
August 4, 2007, 09:12 AM
I have to agree with Jibjab . . . the weight is important, and if both bullets are seated to take the up same amount of case volume then it's probably not all that material. The thing to bear in mind is that the placement of the crimp groove, the seating depth inside the case, etc contribute to pressure changes.

That being said . . . .I've NEVER had a problem when using load data for a different bullet shape of the same weight (and composition - cast, jacketed) when I started at the minimum load.

Just my .02

Regards,
Dave

pinkymingeo
August 4, 2007, 09:14 AM
WLPs are hot. I've chrono'd the same loads with WLP and Federal primers. There's a velocity difference.

Walkalong
August 4, 2007, 09:15 AM
You can't switch jacketed for lead. You can switch between the same weight lead bullets or the same weight jacketed bullets if you are on the lower end of the data. If you are at the top end of the data back off to starting loads and work up again. Same goes for primers.

WSM MAGNUM
August 4, 2007, 09:30 AM
Best rule of thumb. Anytime you change to a different component from the data, back down 10 percent on powder. Then work up.

CZ57
August 4, 2007, 10:51 AM
gaudio5, there is one more thing to consider: bullet shank length. Different styles of jacketed bullets will have shanks of varying length. The shank is the bearing surface that engages the rifling of the barrel and jacket material can vary also.

For instance, Sierra bullets tend to have the longest shanks and at the same powder charge, cartridge pressure with a Sierra will tend to be the highest among bullets of the same weight. Not a lot of research has been done, but I believe that bullets with brass jackets rather than copper, tend to yield lower pressure. The only brass jacketed bullets I'm aware of that are commonly available are from Montana Gold and the Remington Golden Saber.

The Golden Saber is even more unique because the shank of the bullet is very short in comparison to other jacketed bullets. Remington refers to the shank as the "Driving Band" and is the only part of the bullet that is true diameter. So, along with its brass jacket, the short driving band usually have the Golden Sabers operating at about the lowest pressure for the same powder charge with a given weight.

The next thing to consider is OACL. The depth at which you seat bullets will also affect pressure. The shorter the load, the higher pressure will be with a given powder charge.;)

billybob44
August 4, 2007, 04:12 PM
45 Is completly correct!:):) ALWAYS back off powder-at least 10% when ANY components are changed:what::what:

Walkalong
August 4, 2007, 06:38 PM
The Golden Saber is even more unique because the shank of the bullet is very short in comparison to other jacketed bullets.
Yep.
It takes more powder with a Golden Saber and it can be driven a bit faster than its counterparts in my informal test with them. They give less velocity with the same amount of powder, but can be driven faster because you can burn more powder before the pressure gets up there. Informal tests of course, so don't take my word as gospel or go over recommended data.

gaudio5
August 4, 2007, 10:46 PM
ok is backing off the powder safe? like in my speer book can i go 10% under the starting load data?

Ol` Joe
August 4, 2007, 10:54 PM
I wouldn`t. There is a chance the pressures could be too low and your bullet may stick in your bore. Stay with listed data.

kellyj00
August 8, 2007, 03:53 PM
it's tough to get your bullet to stick in the bore.
I loaded up some 9mm's this weekend with 1 gr of titewad behind a 125gr Lead TC. hit the paper, but didn't cycle the action.

Shot 15 rounds through my XD, manually cycling it after each round. All lead left the barrel.... 1 grain of powder.

jfh
August 8, 2007, 04:34 PM
for example, Win 296, a low-pressure powder that is used for full-house loads in the .357. The win 296 data typically shows about a 1-gr variation for min and max, and there are warnings in the manuals and elsewhere.

And, quite frankly, I disagree with kellyj00's assessment that a stuck bullet is difficult to do. I've done it twice in a 1911--and AFAICT, it was because I did NOT catch my malfunctioning Perfect Powder Measure, which was hanging up because of gunk and wear. These incidents were not just squibs--the bullet was some distance in.

There is also the issue of an overpressure spike because of too-little powder. However, I am not up to speed on this issue, so maybe someone else can chime in.

Maybe the reason kellyj00 didn't get caught with that problem is because of the VERY small case capacity of a 9mm and the burning characteristics of tightwad?

Jim H.

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