Thank you, Colonel Tibbets


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Texshooter
August 6, 2007, 11:21 PM
and crew.

You saved countless American lives with your dedication and courage.

I want all to remember.

God Bless You

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The-Fly
August 6, 2007, 11:34 PM
Thanks for the reminder, the worthless news media made zero mention of it.

For those who don't know what we're referring to.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki

Junkyard Dog
August 7, 2007, 12:09 AM
I have to give a second thank you to Mr. Tibbetts. Thank you Texashooter
for jogging my memory as to what happened today in 1945. My father fought
in the south pacific in WWII. He is gone now but I am happy to say that he
made it home and he was able to be a very good father to me.
Thanks to Col. Tibbetts and crew and also all of the men that fought for our
country in WWII. We thank you for all that you have done.

Rich K
August 7, 2007, 01:02 AM
A salute to Col.Tibbets and crew, for a job well done.

SMLE
August 7, 2007, 04:51 AM
My Father was a US Marine in WWII. He was studying a map of japan on August 6, 1945. He had already been on Bougainville, Guam and Iwo Jima. His luck very likely would have run out in japan.

Thank you Col. Tibbets, your crew, and the crew of "Bock's Car", the B29 that dropped the Nagasaki bomb,


http://www.smellysmleshooters.net/dad01.jpg

230RN
August 7, 2007, 05:11 AM
Thank all of them who worked on the Manhattan Project.

I've had a pic of the Trinity Test at 25 milliseconds after detonation as my wallpaper at work since mid-July.

People forget the barbarity and fanaticism of such a supposedly civilized country in establishing "The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere."

I am tired of hearing about how we shouldn't have dropped the bombs.

"V-J Day? What's that?"

"Mitsubishi A6M2? What's that? A new car model? Can I park it easily at the mall?"

Here's a pic my Pop took from our upstairs bedroom window of the local American Legion Post marching by on the first V-J Day. (Ozone Park NY, 1945.) Pop built Liberty Ships at the Brooklyn Navy Yard throughout the war.

doubleg
August 7, 2007, 05:24 AM
Its amazing how the media tries to guilt trip Americans for choosing to end the war early and save thousands of lives. :banghead: They forget that it was one of the most important events of the 20th century. Thanks to everyone who was involved.

sacp81170a
August 7, 2007, 05:28 AM
I am tired of hearing about how we shouldn't have dropped the bombs.

As a Cold Warrior, I'm tired of hearing about all the horrible things we did over the past 50 years and how it turned the "downtrodden people" of the Third World against us. We did what we did so mankind could have a future. For better or worse, we're still here to talk about it. Consider the alternatives...

Hats off to Col. Tibbets and the men of the 509th.

Orthonym
August 7, 2007, 05:38 AM
as it really is germane, the Little Boy weapon having been a gun-type bomb.

Oh, and my Dad was at Saipan for that. He had turned down an opportunity to go home aboard USS Indianapolis. I am glad he did so, or I might not exist. All things considered, I think I'd rather exist, than not.

308win
August 7, 2007, 07:05 AM
Col. Tibbets lives in the Columbus area and normally the local rag will have something but I haven't seen anything this year. My father was in the Pacific from the beginning as a combat engineer and worked on the Tinian airfield. He remarked once that when the bombs were dropped his unit was training for the invasion of Japan and no one expected to come home. Like many of that generation, Col. Tibbets and his crew did their job with no expectations - where did that aspect of our national culture disappear to?

Gustav
August 7, 2007, 07:18 AM
In 1945 my dad was in the Philippines cleaning out holdouts and snipers when his unit got the word the A bomb had been dropped, many people today forget how fanatical an enemy the Japanese warriors and government were at that time in using everything from death marches and forced labor camps to human wave attacks and eventually kamikazes.
The whole Japanese nation had been training and preparing to repel any invasion there were literally tons of war materials and weapons stashed away to face the allies if and when they invaded and had we done so it would have been a much bloodier fight than any of the islands we had taken before.
From what I understand had we invaded all POW's Japan held would have been executed rather than risk being liberated by our forces.
After the second bomb my dads orders were changed from training to invade Japan to one of occupation duty and the dismantling of the war materials and arms that had been stockpiled.
Horrible as both atomic bombs were they forced an end to the daily carnage and suffering and brought the bloodiest war in human history to a close.
My thanks go out to ALL Veterans both young and old, freedom is not free it is priceless having been paid for in untold blood sweat and tears.

1911 guy
August 7, 2007, 07:40 AM
Thank you, Colonel Tibbets.

The planned invasion of Japan was expected to have such high losses that the leading divisions were not figured into the second days plans. They saved a lot of lives.

crankshop1000
August 7, 2007, 08:30 AM
My dad was a flex gunner on a B29 on Tinian when the bombs were delivered.There was a lot of security, but he saw plenty.Truly the greatest generation.Yes we need to remember history as it really happened, not as some have rewritten it.Tibbets and crew are good representitives of the many WWII heros and everyday grunts.

ozwyn
August 7, 2007, 08:42 AM
Given the mass suicide of Japanese civilians in Okinawa, the surrender prompted by the atomic bombs saved a lot more Japanese lives than Americans.

The use of the atomic bombs may be an ugly choice in revisionist retrospect, but it saved millions on both sides.

Deanimator
August 7, 2007, 09:07 AM
Thank you, Colonel Tibbets

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

and crew.

You saved countless American lives with your dedication and courage.

I want all to remember.

God Bless You
The Japanese are the ones who REALLY ought to be thanking him. He and the crew of Bock's Car as well, saved Japan as a nation.

If we'd had to invade Japan, if you wanted to meet an ethnic Japanese, you'd have had to go to California or Brazil. They were definitely in the express lane for the "Max Mad" prequel.

Torghn
August 7, 2007, 09:16 AM
One thing people fail to relies is the social and economic impact on Japan. Dropping the atomic bomb on Japan was probably the single greatest event in Japanese's history. If the allies had to invade Japan, Russia would have probably been very involved. Not even counting the hundreds of thousands of Japanese's lives it saved, if the Russians had been part of the invasion they would have been part of the occupation as well. Japan would probably be similar to Korea right now, and how Berlin was for half a century. The capitalistic half would be doing well, but the communist half would be living in squaller and poverty just like North Korea.

Every Japanese citizen should be thankful everyday the nuclear bomb was invented, if not their country would be a very different place.

Mongo the Mutterer
August 7, 2007, 09:18 AM
Thank you Colonel, for giving me my step-father.

USMC, 6 Division, 15th Marines, HQ Company, Okinawa. (and Saipan, and Guadalcanal, and a few others)

BigG
August 7, 2007, 10:11 AM
Let's not forget Harry Truman who had the cojones to order the mission. Col Tibbets and crew did the job, but would have had no job if the order did not come.

alex_trebek
August 7, 2007, 10:12 AM
Thank you Colonel Tibbets, and all retired and current military personell for the freedoms we all enjoy.

Tokugawa
August 7, 2007, 10:30 AM
My father was married with 3 kids,and was drafted out of an aircraft engine plant and was training in the Phillipines for the invasion of Japan when the bomb was dropped.
My father in law was a infantryman serving in France ,Germany and Czechoslovakia and right after VE day was sent to the Phillipines for the invasion.
So I guess the bomb saved my life and my wifes life.

Neo-Luddite
August 7, 2007, 10:41 AM
In March of 2005, he publicly stated “If you give me the same circumstances, hell yeah, I'd do it again.”
(Gen. Tibbets)

I took my Mom to (Roman Catholic) church this past Sunday w/ my kids. In the bulletin there was some sappy little paragraph designed to make everyone feel bad about the use of atomic weapons on human beings and just how rotten and evil that had been. They even got the date wrong as having been the 5th of August.

It amazes me the fools that STILL want to take a bath in guilt over the order that Pres. Truman gave to use atomic weapons. They forget the kind of steel his faith was made from--and probably missed the part where in his first public statement after the successful mission he gave praise and thanks to almighty G-d.

Fancy THAT; A man with a high school education, hard battlefield experience as an artillery officer, un-questioned fidelity to his wife, and faith in a Supreme Being---and these were not exceptional credentials.

Deanimator
August 7, 2007, 10:51 AM
I took my Mom to (Roman Catholic) church this past Sunday w/ my kids. In the bulletin there was some sappy little paragraph designed to make everyone feel bad about the use of atomic weapons on human beings and just how rotten and evil that had been. They even got the date wrong as having been the 5th of August.

Virtually all current opposition to the atomic bombings is rooted in ignorance, dishonesty or varying combinations of both. It is of a kind with Holocaust revisionism.

Firefall
August 7, 2007, 10:52 AM
I had the priveledge to meet and talk with Gen. Tibbetts on several occaisions. He was a very intelligent man who knows he did the right thing by dropping the A-bomb on the Nips. He signed a photo for me which has the inscription: "made it to Tokyo on time." I totally agree. Also, I talked to Col. Rex Barber who shot down Admiral Yamamoto's bomber with his P-38 Lightning. Another great American hero!

In this PC world, we who say that the Enola Gay's crew are heroes, and they were/are, we catch hell by the liberals. But, these same 'liberals' wouldn't be alive today to criticize us and Gen'l. Tibbetts had the fanatical Japs not been smoted! The barbaric Japs would have murdered thousands and thousands of American men, women and children had they won the war. I write this after seeing a Jap bomber pilot on the History Channel this morning describe how his bomb killed 1,100 Americans aboard the Oklahoma, in Pearl Harbor. He was smiling! :mad:

I'm proud my father was in a P-38 group in New Guinea/Philippines who fought the Nips! Amen!!

Firefall

jaysouth
August 7, 2007, 11:07 AM
I had a cousin die a horrible painful lingering death last year. I was hoping that his end would be peaceful and long away given his start in life. His father was a civil servant in the Colonial Phillipine government when the japs invaded the phillipines. He and his wife and two children, one of them my cousin, were herded into an internment camp in Jan 42. Before the end of the year the father was executed and the baby died of malnutrition. To keep my cousin from dying from malnutrition, his mother gave him most of her food ration. After a year she was blind from malnutrition. She died the next year. When the camp was liberated, my cousin was a 7 year old orphan that weighed 30 pounds.

wish I could kill a couple of million of those slant eyed devils myself.

JohnL2
August 7, 2007, 11:12 AM
I think a lot of Pacific Rim countries are secretly glad that the Japanese were A-bombed.

jaysouth
August 7, 2007, 11:25 AM
Someday, whether by weight of economic force or feat of arms, China will own those islands off its coast that we call japan.

Somehow, I don't think that the chinese will ever forget the sadism that the japs visited upon their people and country. The japs murdered over 300,000 civilians in Nanking alone, mostly for sport.

Sure wish I could get a couple of licks in on the bastards for murdering members of my family. I can only imagine how the chinese feel. Unlike us, they are not fettered with short memories and political correctness.

Deanimator
August 7, 2007, 11:53 AM
In this PC world, we who say that the Enola Gay's crew are heroes, and they were/are, we catch hell by the liberals.
I AM a liberal and occasionally leftists, Japanese fascists and neo-Nazis pretending to be Japanese fascists have TRIED to give me hell for supporting the atomic bombings. In each and every case, that went as well for them as the Battle of the Lunga River went for the Japanese on Guadalcanal. The result is always bodies floating face down in the rhetorical water.

Junkyard Dog
August 7, 2007, 09:59 PM
It is very interesting to see that so many members here at THR have
fathers and relatives that served in the south pacific and WWII We are all here because of them. To say that they were the " greatest generation that
ever lived " I think is an understatment. Just my thoughts.

jaholder1971
August 7, 2007, 10:04 PM
As a side note: The 509th Bomb Wing still exists today, flying the B2 Spirit Stealth Bomber out of Whiteman AFB in Missouri.

Rembrandt
August 7, 2007, 10:40 PM
Threatend with jail and a court marshall, my uncle never disclosed his role in the Pacific until the 1970's....he was a navigator on one of the two B-29 photographic planes that flew with the "Enola Gay" on it's trip to Hiroshima. At the time they didn't know what effect the bomb might have on the aircraft, all viewed the mission as a possible one way suicide trip....fortunately the planes survived and the mission brought an end to the war.

Neo-Luddite
August 7, 2007, 10:59 PM
Which photographic aircraft-'The Great Artiste'? No reason, just always liked the name and nose art.

CajunBass
August 7, 2007, 11:20 PM
My dad was a farm worker here in Virginia, and hadn't been called up. He said that in July, 1945, he was told that he would be in the first call up, in January, 1946.

He always counted himself as one of those saved by "the bomb."

Thank you Col. Tibbets and rest of the WWII generation.

U.S.SFC_RET
August 8, 2007, 06:44 AM
It was a race to develop the atomic bomb. Who could develop the bomb first. I am very glad the Germans didn't and couldn't do it first, if they had the events would have changed the world for the worst.
Thank you Gen. Tibbets. I am very grateful for the servicemen who sacrificed to put a stop to Germany. They were desperately trying to develop the Atomic Bomb and we were smart enough to gather some of the worlds greatest talent to get it done for liberty and not fascism
Neutrality isn't the answer when it comes to tyranny. The Japanese really screwed up when they bombed pearl harbor. They didn't think about the American industrial might to bring about more ships in a quick hurry. You can thank the Americans for the Panama Canal.

General Geoff
August 8, 2007, 07:03 AM
While WWII was indeed a harrowing experience overall, it continues to demonstrate what courageous people are capable of in times of dire need. The Atom Bomb was the 800lb gorilla that sat on the coffin of Japan's war-making ability while we drove the nails in. Millions would otherwise have died during the planned invasion.

WWII as a whole, will hopefully never be repeated. It was a total war, and total war is hell on everyone involved. But it will always serve as a testament to what America can do when its people are unified in purpose and motivated toward a single goal.

Deanimator
August 8, 2007, 08:37 AM
My dad was a farm worker here in Virginia, and hadn't been called up. He said that in July, 1945, he was told that he would be in the first call up, in January, 1946.

He always counted himself as one of those saved by "the bomb."

A college and Army friend's father was on a cargo ship on the way to Japan when the bombs were dropped. There was no doubt in his mind that his father lived only because those bombs were dropped. I seem to recall from reading "Downfall" that the cargo and transport ships were primary targets for the kamikaze campaign planned for the invasion.

johnmcl
August 8, 2007, 08:44 AM
As a young man back working a summer job ( a very long time ago) I found myself making a delivery to the Air and Space Museum's Paul E Garber Restoration Facility in Silver Hill, MD. The Air and Space Museum is the premier Smithsonian Museum on the National Mall in Washington, DC. The Garber facility is where the Smithsonian restores the aircraft of which they come into possession. These aircraft often aren't much more than wrecks when then come into the system.

Ok, back to the story. I was afforded a 20 min quick walk through the WWII hangar by the foreman and felt like I was walking amongst the chariots of the gods. All too soon it was over. He and I were in the parking lot outside when he pointed to a wingless fuselage in the corner of the parking lot. The fuselage had no wheels, was tilted slightly and pretty much a wreck.

He told me it was the recently-acquired Enola Gay.

I walked over and put my hands on her just aft of the pilots side windows. I peered into the cockpit of history. I then ran my hands down the left side of the fuselage as I slowly walked aft. I felt rivets, seams, metal, and history. Then I came to the waist window. There was no glass so I stuck my head inside.

There two feet in front of me was the bomb rack over an open bombay door. Asphalt peered up through the floor, but 10 seconds later my mind had changed that to the partly cloudy landscape of Japan.

Most people don't get it, but I those two minutes left such the impression that I remember them so clearly and with awe as if they were yesterday.

Thanks,

John

Invalid
August 8, 2007, 08:50 AM
I'm proud my father was in a P-38 group in New Guinea/Philippines who fought the Nips! Amen!!

Firefall

How about you cull the racist crap and instead thank the tens of thousands of innocent civilians for getting nuked back to the stone age? Then again, you did capitalize "Nips," so I guess that's kind of polite.

Morality aside, it must be a burden to carry for Tibbets, as he both saved countless Allied lives and introduced the single most devastating weapon the world has ever seen. Hats off, as I might not be here if it weren't for the Bockscar crew.

308win
August 8, 2007, 09:17 AM
If you have ever read Col Tibbets' thoughts on his role in WWII you know that he is totally comfortable with his role. If you want to introduce 'morality' into this discussion let's revist the atrocities committed by the Japanese against every other race before and during WWII. They haven't been in much of a position to commit similar acts since August 1945.
.

1 old 0311
August 8, 2007, 09:27 AM
If anyone is interested I have a copy of the After Action Report from 1945. It is signed by Paul Tibbets. It is on 8 1/2 X 14 paper. I can't scan, and post it, but if anyone wants a copy, and has a fax I will be glad to get it to you.

Cannonball888
August 8, 2007, 09:37 AM
If the allies had to invade Japan, Russia would have probably been very involved.
Involved only politically. The soviets would likely have only claimed "rightful" territories after the war . It is highly doubtful they would have actively participated in an wartime invasion of Japan. The Soviets had lost more than 40 million people in their war with Hitler. Only 1 in 10 soldiers survived.

It's interesting that in the beginning a war with Japan was never considered by the soviets because of a two-front conflict and the risk to the soviet armaments factories in the east. But FDR offered to share with Stalin post-war the technology of a secret bomb if he would atttack Japan. Stalin refused to attack for the aforementioned reasons but also because he was skeptical such a bomb was even possible. Stalin did eventually declare war on Japan but only after the bombs were dropped. Apparently he hoped the US would still make good on their promise to share the secret. :rolleyes:

Invalid
August 8, 2007, 09:39 AM
If you have ever read Col Tibbets' thoughts on his role in WWII you know that he is totally comfortable with his role. If you want to introduce 'morality' into this discussion let's revist the atrocities committed by the Japanese against every other race before and during WWII. They haven't been in much of a position to commit similar acts since August 1945.

Yeah, I know he's comfortable in it, and no, I'd rather not introduce the moral consequences of it all in this thread, as stated earlier. Again, I'm living like a king in America due in no small part to the bombings, so let's just cut off the argument with a comment of "awful, tragic, inhumane, and ultimately a means to peace."

1 old 0311, that's pretty dope. Too bad you can't scan it- you have a piece of history on your hands, and I'm sure the majority of THR (myself included) would like to see it.

El Tejon
August 8, 2007, 09:44 AM
I should add my thanks as well.

My maternal grandfather was preparing for the invasion of Japan with the 4th Marine Division and my paternal grandfather was awaiting orders in Germany to be transferred to the PTO. I would still be here as my parents were born in '39, but I'm really glad I knew my grandfathers, they were both shooters and decent, solid men. I knew my grandfathers because of men like Tibbets.

Col. Tibbets, I know you never met Oren Cassius Page of Sullivan County, Indiana or Herschel S. Freeman of Bloomington, Indiana but thanks for doing what you did for them.:)

Omaney
August 8, 2007, 09:56 AM
I keep this print in my office to remind me of a whole generation's sacrifices. "The Return of the Red Gremlin" Col. Tibbets and several of the "Enola Gay" crew signed this print in a limited edition. The story is here
http://home.att.net/~sallyann4/secret-mission.html

If you haven't read up on the Manhattan Project, it is a fascinating read. We were babes in the woods...as bad as the Apollo Project.

Feral Cowboy
August 8, 2007, 10:09 AM
When the Germans surrendered in WWll, my Dad who was in southern Germany at the time was sent, along with his whole infantry battalion, to southern Italy to start training for the invasion of Japan. If those bombs had not been dropped, I am sure I would never have seen him again. It was estimated by the War Department that upwards of 500,000 American troops would have been killed if we had invaded Japan.
God Bless those who were killed by the bombs. Thank you God for those allied soldiers who lived because of the bombing. God Bless Harry Truman, Col Tibbets, and all those that were involved in making the bombing happen.

XavierBreath
August 8, 2007, 10:20 AM
This thread is off topic, and is bound to end badly.

Calling people "slant eyed devils" "nips" "japs" is not what we do on the High Road. Take that stuff elsewhere. There are plenty of forums for that kind of thing. Use a search engine.

While I hold Col. Tibbets and his crew in the highest of esteem, I also lived, and was homeported in Yokosuka Japan, flew out of Atsugi Japan, have many Japanese friends still, and the last time I checked Japan had been an American ally for over 50 years.

Remember the mission, remember the courage, and salute the crew for making history and bringing a war to it's end, but do not use their place in history as a vehicle for continued racism.

Brian Williams
August 8, 2007, 10:24 AM
HEY ALL, The war is over and has been for a long time, lets keep the generalizations and racial name calling out of THR.
This is important history, whether you agree that we should have dropped the bombs or not, it happened.
I seem to remember that many of the guys in the crews who flew these mission had problems due to guilt.

My hat's off to them for their bravery.

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