How do you describe the perfect trigger break?


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Indiana35
August 13, 2007, 01:40 PM
To anyone out there... what word or term would you use to describe that moment where the sight picture is perfect and the shot goes off almost automatically...?

Can it be described with one word, or how would you describe it?
Thanks

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cdrt
August 13, 2007, 02:19 PM
How about "priceless"?

Just kidding...more precise would be "in the groove", "in the zone" and/or "focused".

BigG
August 13, 2007, 02:46 PM
The traditional term among the old gun writers like Keith or Askins would be "it breaks like a glass rod."

Now, I don't know about you but I haven't broken many glass rods, but I think it means that you apply increasing pressure but the trigger makes no discernible movement until it SUDDENLY releases. Like a S&W revolver's single action break.

Indiana35
August 13, 2007, 02:50 PM
"Priceless"... now that is pretty good....

Blackfork
August 13, 2007, 06:36 PM
Everyone talks about it but very few people tell you EXACTLY what a proper shot is made of.

1. Assume a natural point of aim. Set up your body so that your firearm points naturally at your target. If you have to muscle the front sight or crosshairs over, you DON'T have a NPA. To find it, close your eyes and bring the firearm into firing position. Open your eyes and make adjustments. Repeat until you are on the target and the firearm points at the target. Adjustments should be made from contact with the Earth up. If you are off, don't swing the rifle- move your back foot.

2. Build a perfect sight picture. Six Oclock, center mass, whatever you prefer. Line up the sights with your eye, then add the target. FOCUS YOUR EYE ON THE FRONT SIGHT OR CROSSHAIRS.

3. Breathe. Take a deep breath and let it out. Repeat. The front sight ought to fall and rise to your aiming point.

4. Take the slack out of the trigger if you are shooting a two-stage. Add pressure if you are shooting a one stage. (On my 2-stage Jewel trigger shooting 200 yard offhand in Highpower Rifle, I get on and off the first stage to re-inforce the isolation of my trigger finger from the rest of my body.)

5. Breathe, then exhale until the front sight rises to the target with the perfect sight picture, pause your breath at the natural respiratory pause, pressure the trigger straight back. Think: Smooth. Straight back. Commit to the trigger and keep it moving.

6. Totally and completely ignore the recoil/noise/shot going off and ride the recoil for the follow-through. Just because the gun went off does NOT mean you are finished! Hold your finger ALL THE WAY TO TO REAR ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE RECOIL and FOLLOW-THROUGH.

6. For semi-autos, reset the trigger by releasing pressure until you feel it re-set. Don't take your finger all the way off the trigger unless you have to cycle the bolt. Even shooting single shots, hold the trigger all the way to the rear all the way through the shot. I don't care if you are firing a flintlock or a suicide bomb vest, HOLD THE TRIGGER BACK UNTIL THE RECOIL IS OVER.

So, NPA, Sight picture, Breathe, trigger up, break the shot, ride the recoil and follow through, reset.

SIRVEYR666
August 13, 2007, 08:42 PM
Crisp.

I like the breaking glass analogy, too.

30Cal
August 13, 2007, 08:51 PM
I call it "automatic finger" where you've dryfired and practiced to the point where no conscious effort is required to break the shot when the correct sight picture appears.

Ty

yar
August 14, 2007, 04:51 AM
When I'm on I don't feel anything from trigger, nor do I particularly feel much from the gun. I'm fairly detached and it's like I'm watching a movie. I just see the gun float from target to target and I know the hits are there.

jmorris
August 14, 2007, 09:59 AM
Brian Enos calls it Zen.

MrBorland
August 14, 2007, 01:35 PM
that moment where the sight picture is perfect and the shot goes off almost automatically...?

Synchronicity...

It describes 2 or more unrelated events happening in some apparently casual and meaningful way.

One could argue that there's no synchronicity in shooting since the gun clearly fires as a result of the trigger being pulled. Agreed. But this describes "ordinary" shooting.

When "the sight picture is perfect and the shot goes off almost automatically" is so perfect a moment, it can only be synchronicity.

Pat McCoy
August 14, 2007, 02:02 PM
Ideal

Deavis
August 14, 2007, 06:26 PM
Trained

wanderinwalker
August 14, 2007, 10:46 PM
I agree with 30Cal's desciption. When I let my eye and finger do the work on my AR, the results are almost magical and effortless. Whenever the grey-matter starts to get too involved, well, then it ain't so pretty.

It seems to me that most any competition shooter (or anybody who shoots enough) knows when he/she has made a good shot. Your eyes and mind just KNOW where it went.

Personally, I don't like the "glass-rod" thing with zero-overtravel and blah blah blah. I like my trigger to swing a little, because sometimes the best way for me to get the shot down is to get aggressive, and hitting that stop from a run jars everything. Not to be confused with really yanking on the trigger, but an aggressive, controlled break that has to go RIGHT NOW.

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