Finishing Animals.


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bg226
August 14, 2007, 04:25 PM
When hunting, sometimes one cannot always get a clean kill. Thus a finishing shot may be necessary.

What pistol caliber and ammo would be approprate? Hogs and deer come to mind.

Any experiences?

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Gun Wielding Maniac
August 14, 2007, 04:35 PM
Since you'll be delivering a point blank shot to the melon, almost any pistol would be appropriate. In fact, why not simply use your rifle? I've been known to carry handguns while hunting. But not for the purpose of putting down animals...more for two legged-predators.

ArmedBear
August 14, 2007, 04:40 PM
If you're talking about putting down an animal that's almost dead, a .38 snubbie or smaller will work fine. I work with a guy who raised a couple pigs in his yard, and a guy who came to slaughter them used a .22 pistol.

If, on the other hand, you're talking about defensively shooting a relatively large, pissed-off animal charging you in the brush, I'd use a .44.

Depends.

HippieCrusher
August 14, 2007, 04:40 PM
Either a knife or whatever you shot it with initially. Only once have I ever had to take a follow up shot. It was on my first buck and my nerves contributed to a poorly placed intial shot. My follow up shot was close range with a .270.

bg226
August 14, 2007, 04:47 PM
Yes, the topic is about putting down a wounded animal.

I've heard a few scary stories about small caliber bullets not penetrating the melon.

isp2605
August 14, 2007, 05:09 PM
My uncle use to own a packing house where I would help him on occasion. We killed all the cattle and hogs with a .22 Short gallery rd. Killed hundreds of animals for butchering. Never saw any of them take more than 1 rd.
As far as carrying another gun while deer hunting make sure the practice and the gun are legal where you hunt.

Mikhail Konovalov
August 14, 2007, 05:26 PM
Heck. Ever since that time I emptied a full 25 round mag of .22LR into a Raccoon's brain stem and only got it to calm down (I would be a horrible surgeon.), I carry a .45 when deer hunting for possible follow-up shots, not to mention no-legged predators. A shotgun or one of those .410 derringers are supposed to be better for it, but I work with what I have.

I must admit, though, two-legged predators are a mild concern in my local hunting grounds. Ever since that crazy park shut down and the big lizards busted out...

41magsnub
August 14, 2007, 05:35 PM
I carry my 4" barrel .357 Security six on my hip hunting as a backup/finisher (shot a doe with it as the primary gun once when it walked right by me, 5' shot right to the head which was a little messy). I carry two speed loaders and only 5 in the gun for safety.

I base my decision to use the pistol for a finisher instead of a rifle purely on hearsay and because I feel better with the backup gun and want to use it for something. As far as safety as long as the critters head is not resting on a rock or something it is probably all the same.

Technically the pistol is concealed as it is usually under my jacket even though I don't have a CCW, but in the country in Montana that is kosher.

I have had to finish other people's deer before with it or hand them the gun to do it. Only once did I have to finish my own deer after I jerked off the crappiest 50 yard shot in history and got it in the rear end and it fell out of LOS.

Cosmoline
August 14, 2007, 05:44 PM
Bayonet!

MS .45
August 14, 2007, 06:10 PM
I would just use whatever you shot it with initially. A close range rifle shot to the head will end it quick. Of course, there could be considerations if it is a good buck and you want to have it mounted.

41magsnub
August 14, 2007, 06:14 PM
Bayonet!

Maybe I can duct tape one to my ruger M77.....

Cosmoline
August 14, 2007, 06:27 PM
I actually thought about it as a method with surplus rifles. But then I got to thinking about a wounded bear suddenly getting up again, but this time with my rifle stuck in him. LOL

trueblue1776
August 14, 2007, 06:30 PM
I was always fond of the knife method, much more respectful to the kill.

Desk Jockey
August 14, 2007, 07:23 PM
Just be sure it's legal. I was surprised to learn from the DOW here that you can't put the animal down with a handgun, unless that handgun is legal for hunting. For deer or elk, that means that a .357 or a 45 ACP are not acceptable.

elrod
August 14, 2007, 07:37 PM
I use a .22 LR handgun for "put down" on severely wounded deer (only had to once). I suppose if it were still mobile, and I could see it, another pop from the .280 would be in order. No way would I use a knife to "Jim Bowie" a wounded deer!:o

tkendrick
August 14, 2007, 10:01 PM
most states I've hunted in, carrying a handgun during rifle season is a good way to get a major fine

jaholder1971
August 14, 2007, 10:15 PM
Use the gun you used for the first shot. I do at times carry a .45 or .357 while deer hunting but never used them on deer.

Possums, coyotes, a racoon and 2 stray dogs chasing deer are 2 separate issues...

Deer Hunter
August 15, 2007, 12:10 AM
Just slit the neck with a good knife.

jefnvk
August 15, 2007, 12:57 AM
Cut the neck

I'd use whatever I used to shoot it in the first place, if I wern't to use a knife. Game laws can be awfully particular about what i sused to kill an animal, be sure of what it is.

Gunnerpalace
August 15, 2007, 01:14 AM
I agree with Cosmoline a bayonet would be good when heading over to check it (if it jolts back suddenly you wont have time to draw), and if you get attacked by anything in case you run out of ammo probably would not be a bad idea also.

jefnvk
August 15, 2007, 02:25 AM
Just a note, as with the handguns, bayonets are illegal in some localities for hunting. MI for example, at least they were a few years back, havent looked recently

TehK1w1
August 15, 2007, 02:39 AM
If legal, any handgun should work if the animal cannot get up, as you can just shoot it at point-blank range. A rifle will work just as well, but make a big mess. When I mortally wound an animal (Only happened once so far) I cut it's throat. It is less messy, saves ammo, and I feel it is much more respectful to the animal. On the other hand, it can be dangerous if it has tusks, horns, antlers, etc.

aaronrkelly
August 15, 2007, 03:43 AM
I have a friend that used a cheapy .45ACP HiPoint pistol for just this reason....works great.

jeepmor
August 15, 2007, 08:15 AM
most states I've hunted in, carrying a handgun during rifle season is a good way to get a major fine


Not an issue in Oregon, you can CCW w/o a permit if hunting. However, IIRC, you cannot finish an animal with a handgun.

gunflint
August 15, 2007, 08:39 AM
We get a lot of car vs moose accidents up here. The deputies are not happy with the "finishing shot" ability of their .45s. Most now use slugs in their shotguns. One deputy said that it (using 45s) reminded him of the scene in Jim Carry's Me Myself and Irene, with the cow. I'd be interested in watching someone slitting the throat of an injured moose that weighs up to 1200 pounds.

CajunBass
August 15, 2007, 11:17 AM
Well, we're shotgun only for deer hunting around here. I never liked the idea of a "finishing" shot with buckshot, so I always carred a couple of loads of No 8 birdshot with me. At point blank range, it would turn their lights out.

Speaking of Bayonet's. I sent an E-mail to the game comission not long ago asking if an SKS would be legal for deer hunting in rifle areas, in particular the magazine capacity, and the bayonet. I was told there is no magazine limit in Virginia (for rifles) and as long as I kept the bayonet folded, and didn't use it, it was no problem. So I guess a banzi charge at a deer is out of the question. :D

Omaney
August 15, 2007, 11:53 AM
I had a couple of 9mm. bounce off of a 200# hog. I now use a 40 S&W and aim for the eye.

kframe357
August 15, 2007, 11:57 AM
I carry either my .357 or a .45 while hunting with a rifle.

Although, I sometimes hunt with my .44 mag, so I guess it would be that then. :D

camsdaddy
August 15, 2007, 12:01 PM
Just a little experience. I had a friend who shot a nice buck last year let it sit for awhile when he went up to it the deer stood up and came toward him I dont think it was intentional just trying to get away by the time the dear got away he friend looked like he had been in a fight with a roll of barbed wire. I think I will be more carefull from here on out.

willsnipe
August 15, 2007, 01:33 PM
I usually finish mine with a knife and fork! :rolleyes: Well ... OK ... sometimes I knaw a little off the bones... but not in public. :D

Wheeler44
August 15, 2007, 05:37 PM
IIRC "finishing off" any game animal during black powder or archery season is illegal in my state. I know that doesn't exactly relate to the thread but it does illustrate the importance of knowing the hunting laws where you hunt.

ArmedBear
August 15, 2007, 05:42 PM
Just a little experience. I had a friend who shot a nice buck last year let it sit for awhile when he went up to it the deer stood up and came toward him I dont think it was intentional just trying to get away by the time the dear got away he friend looked like he had been in a fight with a roll of barbed wire. I think I will be more carefull from here on out.


Yeah. I ran into a guy with a doe tag who did the same. Thing seemed to be down for the count, but when he approached, it jumped from the brush, right at him. He had an opportunity to find out firsthand that a scoped .308 doesn't make a great close-quarters weapon. His last round was lucky -- a neck shot. The rest went all over the place.

The point is, even if you're thinking it's just a mortally wounded animal that needs to be finished off with a .22, it might spring at you. Larger caliber can be helpful.

bhk
August 15, 2007, 08:01 PM
While I often carry a handgun while rifle hunting deer (legal here), any finishing shot I make is with the rifle I initially shot the deer with. It seems like the most humane thing to do, although it rarely happens.

I often carry the handgun (.44 SW Mountain Gun) in case a really unaware deer comes close enough for a clean kill. Of the 73 deer I have bagged, 2 nice does were taken this way (both at about 12 yards).

koja48
August 15, 2007, 09:13 PM
Not a good idea, IMHO. Shoot them with whatever you shot them with the first time, or use a handgun more potent than a .22. Even spindly-legged deer are quite powerful (don't ask me how I know, but accept the fact that it was exciting there for a bit . . .).

forquidder
August 15, 2007, 09:39 PM
You'd be amazed at the hoof accuracy of a whitetail with eyes closed presumably in its last minutes of life when that knife tip hits its neck and the difficulty of getting it out of the woods, one handed. ;)

bg226
August 16, 2007, 11:08 AM
I had a couple of 9mm. bounce off of a 200# hog. I now use a 40 S&W and aim for the eye.

Did you use JHP's for the 9mm? What brand?

Pumpkinheaver
August 16, 2007, 11:47 PM
.45 acp hardball works pretty good and doesn't make a mess. The .22lr works good too but isn't legal everywhere.

rantingredneck
August 16, 2007, 11:54 PM
For deer I've had good results with .40, 9mm, .45ACP and .45 Colt. Neither has ever taken more than one finishing shot when I've walked up on a deer that was still kicking. I had to finish one with a knife once. Wasn't pretty, took awhile even though I got the pipes all the way around. I prefer another bullet if it's necessary.

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