Bad hunting manners!


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H&Hhunter
August 14, 2007, 05:17 PM
There are few things new or even some old hunters need to know about manners when it comes to hunting. Here are a few of the ways a guy can be guarantied to not be invited back to ranch/farm/camp next year.

If you are invited to hunt with a person that mean YOU. DO NOT show up with another hunter/hunters at the guys camp. I've had this happen more times than I like to recall. Once I invited a guy caribou hunting and he showed up with 5 GUYS! I had a two seat airplane so I just left them all behind.:mad:

If you are given permission to hunt on a piece of private land that means YOU not you and your buddies. If you want to hunt with your buddies ask permission for them too!

If you are hunting on a lease as a guest with the lessee DO NOT try and negotiate yourself a hunt with the owner behind the lessee's back. And do not try and out money the lessee with the landowner. That is not only a sure way to never get invited hunting again it is a pretty good way to wind up with a broken nose. If you want on the lease do it through the current lessee's.

NEVER give another mans hunting dog a command without his permission. I once had a guy turn one of my blood trailing dogs lose on a wounded coyote! I never did break that dog of chasing coyotes after that. I wanted to kill that SOB hunter on the spot but they have rules about that!:fire:

DO NOT shoot over or around or into the area a hunting dog is baying an animal until the dog owner/ handler gets there and pulls the dog back for the shot. I had a dog shot three years ago when an excited hunter let fly into the middle of a hog that was fighting my dog. That didn't go over to well.

In regards to above DO NOT stand there and yell NO or LEAVE IT to a dog that is doing his job by baying an animal because you are excited and want to shoot. The dog is trained to do what he does, yelling at him is just confusing him. Only the owner has the ability and the knowledge to know how to disengage the dog, chill out and wait for the owner to show up.

NEVER carry a chambered rifle in a scabbard on a horse.

Never try and shoot from a horse especially if it isn't your horse.

If you've already filled your tag shooting another critter and using my tag isn't only uncool it is illegal.

Don't ever bring a chambered rifle into the cab of my truck. If you are going to show me it is unloaded by pulling the trigger please roll down the window first. That was one expensive day for that hunter!

If you have been invited on a free hunt as aguest and the hunting isn't to good. DON'T WHINE and complain. When I hear things like geez are there any animals on this place? Remember that you are guest and making a comment like that is insulting to the land owner/hunter who out of the goodness of his heart invited you to come and enjoy the place.

Don't give out free gun "advice" to a guy who is carrying a well worn obviously prized rifle with an old time worn out scope on it. It doesn't matter what you are shooting or what the gun mags have to say about how great your new thumperzipper .372 mag with laser scope attached is. The guy who has carried old reliable in the field for umpteen years doesn't care. His rifle has been hunting and killed more stuff than you or your virginal rifle ever will. If you don't have a compliment about your hosts rifle just keep your mouth shut.

Do not point your gun at people.

Get a pair of binoculars DO NOT use your scope as a viewing device. I can't tell you how many times I've seen guys "glassing" me with their scoped rifles.:mad:

If you don't like the food, bring your own or shut up and eat.

If nobody else in camp is drinking booze it probably isn't the best plan to break out the flask and start chugging it down.

If both of you are hunting and you are the guest be hyper sensitive about offering to let the host shoot first. If he wants you to take the shot he'll make that clear in the begining. DON'T BE A GAME HOG! I hunt waterfowl on a private ranch in Northern Co, by invitation of the land owner. We always hunt in the same blind. I pass up many shots to let him have a go first. I also make sure and be there early enough to set decoys get four wheelers running etc. I clean up after the day is over without being asked. Be helpful and get invited in the future.

Don't offer to pay for gas just do it without being asked.

Same goes for meals.

Don't sleep furthest form the woods stove then get up a stoke it all night.

Get your sorry hide out of your bag in the morning and be ready to go. DO NOT make others wait for you.

This was a blank sheet I've had all of these happen to me at one time or another.:)

Good hunting.

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41magsnub
August 14, 2007, 05:44 PM
I would add have respect for the land owners property. This is a story relayed to me by a hunting buddy on how NOT to get invited back.

My buddy has his little black book of hunting locations. His boss heard about it and badgered him into taking him hunting one year (after my buddy asked permission to bring a friend). At the beginning of the hunt they check in with the land owner to make small talk and pick up any tips on where the birds are hiding. As they are talking the boss (guest) lit up a Camel, smoked it, and then flicked the butt into a stubble field. RIGHT IN FRONT OF THE LAND OWNER :banghead:.

The owner turned to my buddy and said you are welcome to hunt here, but that guy is banned. He was so embarrassed he has never gone back to that land to hunt or taken his boss hunting again.

Il Duca
August 14, 2007, 07:12 PM
Here's a piece of public hunting land manners:

Don't use someone else's tree stand. It's not your's. And if the owner comes to hunt and his stand is occupied it might just get you a warning shot across the bow. Seen it happen.

theken206
August 14, 2007, 07:15 PM
THOU ART TO USE THINE BINO's for GLASSING, NOT THINE SCOPE!!!

Kingcreek
August 14, 2007, 07:50 PM
Good points H&H.
If common sense was more common, this thread wouldn't be necessary.

Roebuck
August 14, 2007, 08:11 PM
I guess that abiding by your own stated rules, you are welcome to hunt with me H&H. Come on over!! Oh yes. Bring over some original Coors. Old Adolph did something to that Rocky Mountain Spring Water that I liked. Sh*t, come on over anyway!!:)

Roebuck.

H&Hhunter
August 14, 2007, 09:41 PM
Roebuck,

I am a master booze smuggler. I've smuggled booze from Germany to Colorado many times.;)

I am impressed that you like Coors I find it to be one of the better domestic beers as well.

I have to say that after spending much time in Europe I find most of our beer to be a bit hard to take.

I'd love to come over and hunt!

Greg

trueblue1776
August 14, 2007, 10:18 PM
Cheers to the other Original Coors drinkers, it's what John Elway would do :D.

H&H, You forgot three:

Smoking in camp is fine, smoking next to me right before I head out on a hunt is not, smoking on the trail may get you punched in the face.

Likewise, asking me questions in camp is fine, asking me while I'm stalking is ridiculous.

If you borrow a rifle treat it like it belongs to Jesus himself. Even if it looks rough, if I own it, it shoots.

Pretty obvious stuff, thought I would contribute some of my own grumpiness.

koja48
August 14, 2007, 10:48 PM
Don't use another man's knife without permission (chopping rabbit bones with my Dad's razor-sharp, hand-me-down sheath knife will get you an earful from me, a near beating, & and black-balled forevermore).

When you agree to be back to camp within a certain time frame, adhere to it.

If someone shows you a good spot, don't show it to all your friends (showing up with your buddies the very next day is especially tacky).

Remember that it's highly unlikely that you hit every duck/goose that falls.

Triple S
August 14, 2007, 11:44 PM
If you are given permission to hunt on a piece of private land that means YOU not you and your buddies. If you want to hunt with your buddies ask permission for them too!

I think this is very much one of the cardinal rules to follow when going hunting on someone else's land.

Also, find out exactly what you can and can not shoot. Each landowner has ideas of what he/she wants left or taken off of their property. More times than not, it is better off not to shoot, than to do something to upset the invite-tor.

phantomak47
August 14, 2007, 11:58 PM
Guys I am loving all of these threads with stories and info, I am by no means a well seasoned hunter, but with no one around me that really hunts or I can learn from, I find this info very helpful!

Whitman31
August 14, 2007, 11:59 PM
If you've already filled your tag shooting another critter and using my tag isn't only uncool it is illegal.


Just a note, in Minnesota this (party hunting) is legal, though I don't recommend it unless it's been pre-discussed...

eastwood44mag
August 15, 2007, 12:00 AM
My pet peeve:

Just because it was OK once does NOT mean it's OK in the future. Ask about everything every time. Don't touch my knife, gun, calls, boots, clothes, ammo, etc. without permission. Even if I told you before that you could, don't assume that you can now. There's a big difference between a rifle I just bought off the shelf and one that I've spent hours sighting in and tweaking just the way I like it.

TehK1w1
August 15, 2007, 12:15 AM
A couple more...
Do NOT:
-Relieve yourself right by the stand you have been allowed to use(If it is a stand hunt)
-Field dress an animal and then leave the gut pile by the stand/feeder/cabin
-shoot at livestock to "scare" them away from camp/the stand/the feeder(we had a guy kicked off of our lease a couple years back for shooting a cow, 1 shot through the heart at 120 yds, he claimed it was an accident :scrutiny:)
-Borrow your host's highway driver to go pull out the hunting vehicle he let you borrow that you got stuck 3 miles back on the rockiest trail on the lease.
-DO NOT USE THE RIFLE SCOPE AS BINOCULARS!!!!!

Bartkowski
August 15, 2007, 12:56 AM
This isn't as relavant as some posts, but its still rude and senseless. I was sighting in a rifle on a friends land and the backstop is a hill of thick brush, and out of the treeline someone appeared and walked right behind where I was shooting trying to kick up a rabbit they saw. I started yelling (they were 100 some yards away) for them to move away from the range and they still were trying to kick up a rabbit.

eliphalet
August 15, 2007, 01:09 AM
If the gates closed, leave it that way.

Just cause your out in the boonies doesn't mean it is a good place to throw the trash out of your truck, or empty your ash tray.

Bury your crap and the durn paper too.

Beer or pop cans don't burn, don't leave them in a fire circle.

Hunting on a ATV, use it respectfully it's not for motocross and stay on the trails.

Don't park your truck in the middle of a forest service or other narrow dirt road and go hunting, pull it off to the side.
Don't set up your tent in the road either, just because it is level or flat, (couldn't believe that one.) someone might wanna come through a hour or two before light and your in bed. Had to threaten the guy if he didn't move his truck I was gonna push it off the road for him, and I meant it, before he would get up and move it. FJ40's with 1/4" steel C-channel bumpers push large stuff quite well.

One of the worst I have witnessed was while we stood with a rancher talking he was casually watching some guys up on the hillside he had gave permission to hunt. As he watched the idiot pulled his ATV up to a barb wire fence and proceeded to run over it. Within sight of the house even. It was his last day there.

I am gonna stop it is irritating just remembering these guys.

Sunray
August 15, 2007, 01:21 AM
Then there's, if hunting on a farm, leave any gate that was closed when you waddled along the way you found it.
Those bare wires on a fence or post are very likely electrified. It hurts to touch them.
Show up with Coors and you'll get laughed out of camp. Moreso if it's Coors Lite or Budweiser. Beer is NOT made with rice. Mind you, there are guys who will show up with a 6 pack, then drink other people's rye.
If you can't cook, you can wash dishes, otherwise, stay out of the way. Unless you're putting the kettle on in the morning. If you don't drink coffee, don't try to make it either. By the way, there are people who do drink coffee but can't make it. If you have your coffee made for you at home, don't try to learn in camp.
Bring your own band-aids, bug spray, sun screen, etc.

retrieverman
August 15, 2007, 01:33 AM
This thread is quite ironic for what I am going through right now.

I invited a friend to hunt with me on my families place out of state a couple of years ago, and now, it is just "assumed" (by him) that he will go back (every year). Obviously, my son goes with me, and now, his son is talking about going too.

The guy is a "friend" which make uninviting hard to do, but I dang sure don't want to get his son started coming too.

Any suggestions?

borrowedtime69
August 15, 2007, 01:37 AM
H&H and everybody, very good list, most of it is just common sense and more of that is needed.

If you don't like the food, bring your own or shut up and eat.

If nobody else in camp is drinking booze it probably isn't the best plan to break out the flask and start chugging it down. (Note: i wouldnt be "chugging it down" but , after the guns are safely put away, i'll have a beer or something if i like, if the land owner is a mormon or something he needs to post his rules on the fencepost so we can read it before asking permission.)
If both of you are hunting and you are the guest be hyper sensitive about offering to let the host shoot first. If he wants you to take the shot he'll make that clear in the begining. DON'T BE A GAME HOG! I hunt waterfowl on a private ranch in Northern Co, by invitation of the land owner. We always hunt in the same blind. I pass up many shots to let him have a go first (Note: then why would you want to hunt private land? doesnt seem worth it, to me anyway). I also make sure and be there early enough to set decoys get four wheelers running etc. I clean up after the day is over without being asked. Be helpful and get invited in the future.

Don't offer to pay for gas just do it without being asked. Same goes for meals. (Note: to me, the land owner either wants you there or not, i would offer to pay for one or the other, but im not gonna brown nose and suck up. i usually do good deeds that go unnoticed like fixing stuff i see as i pass, picking up trash, taking notes of any thing not right on the property.)
Don't sleep furthest form the woods stove then get up a stoke it all night.

Get your sorry hide out of your bag in the morning and be ready to go. DO NOT make others wait for you. (Note:, why the hell would you wait for someone, just go?)

these are alot of reasons i hunt alone and only on public land. im out to relax, really relax, i dont want my hunting to be ridged, regimented, cold, stiff, and uncomfortable, i get enough of that at work. i dont want to be consantly worried if i've offended or pissed someone off.

i do fully realize that most land owners have had bad experiances with people they've let hunt their land. lets face it, there's quite alot of human turds walkin the earth right? i cant blame them for being wary and unreceptive to hunters, i can understand why.

however, in the past 10 years, ive only successfully gotten on one private property and that was in WY. the only reason i would hunt on private land is varmint, small game, and pest animals, with .22's and maybe shotguns, nothing too big or loud. i approach with great respect and am very freindly when i ask. either i get a pissy no with a speech of how sick of hunters they are or i get a price menu they charge to get on their land, even when i am hunting animals that damage the landowner's livestock, crops, or property.

ive also heard of dishonest land owners that come after you for some false damage claim to their property just to get some cash. bet it doesnt happen often, but i guess it does occur.

i just havent seen a good relationship between hunter and landowner for about 25 years or so, back when i was a kid.

i have hunted alone for the last 20 years, and, with the exception of family, i will continue to do so. and always on public land. - Eric

Duck Hunting
A city slicker shoots a duck out in the country. As he's retrieving it, a farmer walks up and stops him, claiming that since the duck is on his farm, it technically belongs to him. After minutes of arguing, the farmer proposes they settle the matter "country style."

"What's country style?" asks the city boy.

"Out here in the country," the farmer says, "when two fellers have a dispute, one feller kicks the other one in the balls as hard as he can. Then that feller, why, he kicks the first one as hard as he can. And so forth. Last man standin' wins the dispute."

Warily the city boy agrees and prepares himself. The farmer hauls off and kicks him in the groin with all his might. The city boy falls to the ground in the most intense pain he's ever felt, crying like a baby and coughing up blood. Finally he staggers to his feet and says, "All right, n-now it's–it's m-my turn."

The farmer grins. "Aw, hell, you win. Keep the duck."

eliphalet
August 15, 2007, 01:55 AM
Any suggestions?
Tough one huh? Just say "no".

Be tactful like " maybe the folks/family would prefer just yourself this year" or something along those lines.
Use to do something similar with my kid when some of his friends wanted him to go/do something he really thought better of or didn't want to do, but didn't want to tell them that or lie. He would ask me "Dad tell me I can't go" I would, he wouldn't go. Worked great.

NRA4LIFE
August 15, 2007, 02:08 AM
"If you've already filled your tag shooting another critter and using my tag isn't only uncool it is illegal."

H&H,

Great post, but this item is not quite accurate. OK, it is very UNCOOL under most circumstances. However, Wisconsin (my homeland) does allow Party Hunting, whereby you can continue to hunt after your tag is filled, and fill other's deer tags (with some rules too). Just a nit though, not trying to be inflamatory. It does allow you to keep hunting after :01 in the season when you are so lucky to fill your tag early.

I would add all my un-written rules too, here, but it would take a lifetimes experience to list them. I have a very low tolerance level for "invitees". Too many bad experiences, especially on land that I own.

OK, now I'm started, but only one for now.

If you've been invited to hunt in MY spot, and gut-shoot an antelope, and hurl repeatedly trying to gut it, DO NOT EVER expect me to clean it for you.

I like watching you puke.

Andrewsky
August 15, 2007, 03:00 AM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned road hunting.

The formula for good hunting is simple:

-Be Safe
-Obey the Law
-Be Considerate to Others
-Have Fun

Nothing more needs to be said.

sm
August 15, 2007, 04:41 AM
Dove hunting and new folks. Especially if this is the first hunt of any kind for them and especially if kids.

-You are not there to shoot.
You are there for them!

Safety, and buddy system.
We usually let the younger folks shoot first, it all about them, learning, being safe, and having fun!

Then the new adult folks, this all understood before the hunt.
Again, it is all about them, not you.

Our future depends on new folks being introduced to Hunting in the correct way, one is there as an ambassador for all hunters, firearm owners, no matter the game or firearm use.

Tradition around here is, on these first dove hunts for kids /folks we give a nice penknife.
Tradition, Memories and all are about the new folks, not you.

You had someone treat you the same way, now it is time to pay forward.

alsaqr
August 15, 2007, 09:59 AM
"And if the owner comes to hunt and his stand is occupied it might just get you a warning shot across the bow. Seen it happen."

An ill-advised shot across the bow may lead to a return shot to the boiler room. That has happened too.

waterhouse
August 15, 2007, 11:01 AM
taking notes of any thing not right on the property

On the positive side of things, this is a great one. When you see a broken fence, mark it and let the land owner know. If it hasn't rained for weeks and you walk through a puddle, let the land owner know he might have a leaking irrigation pipe. Little things like this will get you invited back for years.

.41 magnum man
August 15, 2007, 11:04 AM
I happen to own some land behind my house. My dad and 2 of my brothers own land that joins mine, and between us, my kids, and their kids, we have decided that we have just enough room for us to hunt without getting in each other's way, and won't let anyone else in without permission from all the others. We began this when one brother let in a guy to hunt once on his place, but the guy thought he could just come back whenever he wanted. Since we all worked in town at the time, we didn't know for a while he was still hunting the place until my sister in law saw him one day. And the way our properties lay, you can't help but cross each others land to get to certain places. (I have to cross my brother's place to get to a certain ridge that I own.) This guy had went beyond where my brother had said and was even in some of my good spots stinking up the place. So we have not let anyone else in since then.

Now I am a taxidermist and work at home. Some of my customers ask me if they can hunt on my place and I explain to them why I don't let anyone. Most are good about it, but some want to be pushy. I guess they think I owe them something since I get to mount their animal. And some of these guys come in bragging about all the land they get to hunt on, and still act offended if I say no. (And I have never been invited to another property. And I don't ask either.)
And one time, one time, I decide to let this guy hunt on my place after he has asked me several times. He was a good customer, but mainly just seemed like a decent, polite guy. He hunts in all seasons with all weapons, so one day I told him, "I tell you what, since part of my family doesn't bowhunt, then I'll let you come down during bowseason. I have a ladderstand on a certain place where I ususally get one or two a year, and you can hunt there."
Without a pause he answered back, "No, I will bring my gun during rifle season and I will just go back there and find me a place I like, and hunt it."
Of course, he shot himself in the foot, and everyone else's too.

One other thing that gets me is people who think they can ride an ATV on your property without permission. I caught a guy one day on a rinky dink 2 wheel drive atv stuck on the side of a hill, spinning a big hole in the trail. I came up behind him, and he didn't even know I was there. I asked him, "What are you doing here?" He said he just saw this trail and thought he would see where it went. He said two of his buddies even told him they shouldn't be on it. I looked up, and there the two other guys were sitting above us on the trail. I ran them all off with a good chewing, and dog gone if about a week later my neighbor caught another two guys on our place. They were even dumb enough to admit they knew the other guys I had run off and had been told by them not to come down here! Good for those suckers I wasn't there.

I have even met people who think that if you own land, you owe it to everyone else to let them hunt, and that to post your land was being a selfish low down dirty dog. Well, if anyone reads this and thinks that way I have the same question for you that I had for them: Do you leave the keys in your vehicle for anyone who wants to drive it, regardless of who they are, at anytime they want? Why not let anyone who wants come into your house and take over the place? It is exactly the same thing.

Big Az Al
August 15, 2007, 01:48 PM
Don't claim everything that falls just because you shot!

By ALL means do, you shot, speak up, unless oppertunities are few, once you have filled your bag and have to put your gun away, I can relax and really enjoy banging away!

The group that I had/have hunted with, since I was able to hold a gun, if two people claim they shot the dove, usually let the person least likely to fill there bag, have it! When we know that 2 or 3 of shot at the same time, I learned to say "man one of you guy's really hit that one", let them discuss who has one less bird to shoot!

The only one drinking in camp? I am more likely to be the one not. Be discrete about it! Going to the Stove/icechest/creek to get more coffee/soda/water, and poring a little... may be the best way to get that medicinal nip! I won't say don't because, brandy (whiskey/beer/wine) after a hard day May be medicinal, just don't drink to the point of being offensive!

Even on state land let the rancher know what you have seen that he needs to know about! I can't speak for other states but here, most hunting (even bird watching) oppertunities here are because of ranching activities! Take away the water lots that are there because of the cows (The state pays nothing for them) and what is left for the GAME?

I drive a TWO wheel drive vehicle, when I can't get where I want to go because some *********** on an ATV/4wheeldrive destroyed a road that for over fourty years was a two wheel drive road. I just became an anti ATV/4wheel drive minded person. ATV'iers need all the friends they can get! to many people want them gone!

H&Hhunter
August 15, 2007, 03:26 PM
Al,

If you are going to be hunting much I'd recommend you buy yourself a good 4 wheel drive vehicle.

You can get a good used jeep or a pick up pretty darn cheap.

I am not quite sure how a 4 wheeler destroys a road?

ID_shooting
August 15, 2007, 03:29 PM
Most bad juju has been discussed, but plese indulge me and let me add mine. When hunting public, private land, DON'T POACH THE OUT OF SEASON CRITTERS JUST BECAUSE THE IN SEASON ONES ARE SCARCE!

We have an AWSOME dove spot. It is very productive the first few days of the season then it thins out so much we don't bother going back. Last year the ditch line had hundreds of quail, hundreds I tell you. Well, I show up oppening day of quail, not one quail and empty shotgun shells EVERYWHERE!

Lousy scum bags!

alsaqr
August 15, 2007, 05:22 PM
Off and on for nearly 30 years i have hunted squirrels in a large pecan orchard. Am the only person allowed to hunt there. Have helped the guy fix fence, put in a cattleguard and lots of other small stuff that he and his wife appreciate. i hunt with a .410 shotgun because of the low noise level: His wife does not like big bangs. The gent does like to eat squirrels but does not hunt them. Always dress out two or three and give to him.

ID_shooting
August 15, 2007, 06:27 PM
Yes, I will call that proper manners. I always give one pheasant/duck/goose whatever to land owner. Just one of those unspoken rules. Same one as says if a guy volunteers to drive everyone out, he never goes home empty handed.

elrod
August 15, 2007, 07:56 PM
If you are deer hunting with a group (either dog or still hunting),
STAY ON YOUR STAND UNTIL RELEASED Almost shot a guy once because he strayed off assigned stand, then pulled out his hankie (white, of course) to blow his nose.

eliphalet
August 15, 2007, 08:05 PM
I am not quite sure how a 4 wheeler destroys a road?
When it is muddy and or wet a ATV can severely damage dirt roads or trails on a grade or we've seen whole hillsides tore up. There is a large butte near me with a rough 4X4 road over the top and around the back way that ATV;s have ruined. It has been used when it shouldn't have been till there is no dirt left in many areas worn down to solid lava rock. It has become so rough my Toyota 4X4 pickup had a hard time last fall, and places we went down I am sure I could not have gone back up now. I won't be able to use that route again, even with the old FJ40 land Cruiser from what the short ATV's have done I would probably high center. We have used that road for years but it is trashed now.

This is not a ATV bash they are great tools/toys but like most things can be used irresponsibly

redneckrepairs
August 15, 2007, 08:17 PM
Dont shoot my Charolais Cows they look nothing like prarie dogs ( yes i just had one headshot and killed last week ).

Big Az Al
August 15, 2007, 09:01 PM
I am reasonably sure that the 4X4ers that tear up the roads are not hunters.

But we get blamed anyway.

How most of them do it and tear up thier stuff also, is put the gear selector in Nuetral, Rev the engine as high as it will rev, and drop it into drive. I am told the goal is to see who can spin all 4 tires the longest before the vehicle moves! There are some "hunters" that don't have much more brain power and they spin tires through things that you shoud have been able to cruise a sports car over!

Where I like to hunt there are roads that work all weather, that are just below taking passenger cars over, but two wheel drive trucks almost think they are paved. These roads will take you to water holes, several good campsites, and to other trails of verying degree of difficulty. I rarely see any sign sof 4X4's or ATV's off these roads, and am often told I am on a 4X4 road when I run into those people on them.

Then there the trails, where picking my route with a little care a lot of them will take you to places that to go farther you need 4X4's or ATV's, to go farther, 90% of the 4X4ers follow someone with a 2 x back there and stop right where thier rig would still think it was on a main road with out even trying, and never attempt to see where the road goes! 99% Of the ATVers stop here also.

I get a good belly laugh going when I look down from a hillside and see a train of ATV's cruising along one of the (my) main roads, driving right past trails that would take then out of that over used area, and only using some of the lesser side roads after someone like myself drove into an area because there is a good walking place back there!

Them there is the spin the tires everywhere they go ATV crowd, A lot of them even hold some pressure on the front breaks to help the back tires throw more dirt, when the legislature passes a shoot on sight law I am going hunting!!!! Two or three of these can make Broadway right down town impassable given a chance, will maybe not that bad but they can make it a full time job for a rancher to keep roads he needs to use passable!

SO to me if your in a 4X4 and run into a 2X your should be able to farther back without any trouble at all! for ATV's if it looks like an old road, that is over grown to the point where it won't take a full size vehicle, try it you might just find a gem of an area where no one has been in a while.

And what ever we drive, or ride, try to leave the roads and trails so that a little wind will make look like no one has been there in years!

Art Eatman
August 15, 2007, 09:28 PM
Any vehicle that is driven at an angle on a slope will leave at least small depressions. Depending on vegetation and soil type, the next rain of any amount will then start an erosion path. This is particularly true of steeply-sloped country or desert country. Over time, just one wheel track from a small motorcycle can result in a deep gully.

Art

JWarren
August 15, 2007, 10:08 PM
I would add have respect for the land owners property.


+1,000


We used to be tolerant with some hunters duck hunting out our lakes. After the trashing of our land got so bad, we posted it, gated it, locked it, guarded it, and eventually prosecuted a few people for vandalizing our gate and trespassing because THEY got mad that we locked them out.


Now we have a rule in our family... NO ONE outside of family on our land. Sadly, a few ruined it for everyone. Even more sadly, I honestly don't care anymore after the hell we went through after posting the land.


-- John

41magsnub
August 18, 2007, 03:20 AM
One more at least for the ranches I hunt on... if you see a coyote it dies regardless if you are on the trail of the biggest buck the world has ever seen.

Skoghund
August 19, 2007, 08:15 AM
If you are hunting with me and your mobile phone rings you will get sent home PDQ and not invited back.

redneck2
August 19, 2007, 09:16 AM
One more at least for the ranches I hunt on... if you see a coyote it dies regardless if you are on the trail of the biggest buck the world has ever seen.
This is fine on our farm, but I've hunted areas where the guy would get all cranked if you shot varmints. His land, his call.

Anyplace east of the Mississippi there is very little "public land". They are typically game preserves or National Forests and are typically well marked. We've had city folk pull over to our woods and start hunting. "I didn't know anyone owned this" is their line.

Be real sure of your backstop when hunting with a rifle. Back maybe 20 years ago a guy in our group shot at a deer in the middle of a picked cornfield. He was laying down and the deer was on a very small rise. After he shot, he stood up and could see the farmer's pickup that he'd just shot.

I have no idea why, but when it comes to hunting, some guys just lose all sense. They'll kill anything that moves at all costs, trash anything that's there, etc. They're the guys that whine the most when they lose the right to hunt.

Loyalist Dave
August 19, 2007, 09:38 AM
Here's some tree stand etiquette...,

true, your stand is yours, BUT...,

Hang some orange on the back of the tree where your stand sits, so those of us on the ground can avoid you when we can't actually see you. Especially bow hunters out during gun season(s). I don't want to mess up your hunt so let me know where you are.

On public land if you leave your portable temporary stand in a tree overnight, you DON'T have a reservation on that spot in the woods the next day, unless you're IN that treestand when another person shows up.

If you're late to get into the woods to set up your portable stand, and a hunter is already in the woods and close to your favorite tree, don't throw a hissy-fit. You're late not him. Suck it up and walk away quiet.

LD

HankB
August 20, 2007, 12:46 AM
On the subject of someone else using your tree stand . . .

A guy I worked with had, over time, acquired several hundred acres of woods up near Alexandria, MN. Good grouse hunting, decent for deer. He built a number of permanent tree stands before the season in likely areas.

Deer season rolls around . . . he goes up to his land, and finds the gate at his private access road open. Lock has been SHOT OFF and is laying there in fragments. He parks by the gate and walks in . . . sees a couple of pickups parked on a trail on HIS land. What the %$@!?

So he walks a little farther into his property carefully . . . and sees locals up in HIS tree stands!

Not wanting to confront armed locals, he decided to leave quietly.

The trespassers? They had a long WALK out; when they returned to their vehicles, they were . . . unusable.

Atticus_1354
August 21, 2007, 04:50 AM
HankB, that reminds me of something that my uncle did. He was out tending to his farm in the middle of colorado and he catches some kids tearing up one of his private dirt roads. SO he parks the tractor in their way and takes their distributor cap and drives over to the sheriff and hands it to him. The sheriff picked up the guys as they where walking along the road and impounded their truck until they fixed the road.

birdbustr
August 21, 2007, 03:03 PM
If you do bring beer into the field on a hot day, don't drink enough to get you buzzed, and if you don't have enough to share, don't bring it at all.

EVERYTIME you shoot think to yourself. "Am I going to hurt someone if I shoot". Teach this to a hunter young and he/she will do this automatically for the rest of their lives. This is one that Dick Cheney should have been taught.

Art Eatman
August 21, 2007, 03:21 PM
Let's don't get off into the Cheney thing. That was a "It takes two to tango" deal.

The main thing is to know what's behind your targeted game animal, and don't--for example--shoot at a skylined deer.

BayouTeche77
August 21, 2007, 03:39 PM
Just one that I believe is important.

If a landowner gives you permission to hunt his/her land, don't be a stranger until hunting season rolls around next year. Make it a point to visit/help/call the landowner throughout the year.

I help the folks that let me use their property by showing up when its time to dig the potatos, plant the garden, build a shed/tear down a shed etc, and make sure to send them Christmas cards. It lets them know that you truly appreciate what they're doing for you.

Hell, one time two of my buddies and myself made a week-long hunt at a cousin's of one of the other two. He let us hunt his land, stay at his place, drive his truck and drink his beer. Before we left, we brought his truck to get two new tires (we weaseled out of him what kinds after he said they needed replacing) and we had it detailed.

Cougfan2
August 21, 2007, 04:05 PM
Don't use someone else's tree stand. It's not your's. And if the owner comes to hunt and his stand is occupied it might just get you a warning shot across the bow. Seen it happen.

I lived in Minnesota for a few years and have also seen this happen. You don't mess with a man's Gal or his tree stand............not necessarily in that order.:D

Cougfan2
August 21, 2007, 04:21 PM
I was in a Duck hunting club with a guy, unfortunately my boss for a while, had a habit of having a couple of Bloody Maries in the morning before heading for the Duck blind.:what: After the first time I saw him do this I managed to always want to hunt from a different spot than he did. Preferrably FAR away. Still awkward as he was my boss. Left the club after that year because none of the other guys saw a problem with this behavior.:banghead:

cooch
August 25, 2007, 12:17 PM
If you are hunting with me, make up your mind that we are hunting......
Don't pull out your camera or get distracted and hold us up just because you spotted some pretty flower. Cameras come out when we are resting, or after the hunt is finished.
In other words, keep your mind on the job.

If there is a carry-out involved, do your share.

Peter

KiltedClaymore
August 25, 2007, 01:20 PM
although its been said, i had a problem with a guy who decided to camp in the only turnaround spot ON THE SIDE OF A MOUNTAIN. Im going up this road before dawn, and outta nowhere i see this guy in a sleeping bag next to his truck on the only turnaround on the mountain. now, its dark, im on a road that drops off a hundred feet down to no where, and there is a guy sleeping in the road. needless to say, i ended up guiding my dad down the mountain BACKWARDS!!!!!!




and dont get me started on ATVs. when im out hunting, they seem to be drawn to me. how dumb do you have to be to :cuss: around with a guy holding a gun and alot of ammo on his belt?

308win
August 25, 2007, 06:29 PM
Leave your camp site and the land you hunt on cleaner than you found it. Don't shoot towards buildings/livestock/etc. (should be obvious but don't know how many times our livestock, buildings, blinds, and us were dusted or heard bullets zipping overhead).

p35
August 25, 2007, 06:44 PM
Isn't there a flat rule that once you touch alcohol you're done hunting for the day? Most people I know enforce it.

trueblue1776
August 25, 2007, 06:58 PM
Isn't there a flat rule that once you touch alcohol you're done hunting for the day?

Not where I'm from. I've never hunted with a sloppy drunk though.

Andrewsky
August 27, 2007, 03:32 AM
When they started yelling "ALCHOHOL, TOBACCO, AND FIREARMS!" I thought they were making a delivery.:mad:



















I've only been hunting 5 or 6 times and I've never had any problems. The people I hunt with are great.

Mikhail Konovalov
August 27, 2007, 05:53 AM
My father went hunting with someone once, a newbie. The newbie, my father, and Papa's friend were all sitting in the stand, trying to get the newbie to shut up, when a buzzard perched on a limb outside the stand.

The newbie just wouldn't have it. He reached out, grabbed the vulture by its legs, and jerked it into the stand! The bird puked on everyone, and this guy was blacklisted for all eternity as a hunting buddy.

But this one's better...

My father and I went dove hunting one year, and this pack of noisy yuppies was across the field from us with unplugged shotuns, practicing spray and pray on every bird they saw, and not just the ones which were safe to shoot. Every time a bird came into their vicinity it sounded like the Civil War. I was mopping up their missed doves with a 20 ga. Remington 1100, not doing a bad job of it, either, and they started shooting at me! They were 150-200 yards away peppering my father and I.

I was glad when the game warden hauled the lot of 'em off.

Mrs. Hoppes
August 29, 2007, 10:42 PM
From the wife perspective:

Let your wife know where you will be hunting so if you don't return home at a reasonable time, she can tell the police where to start looking for your body.

Also (and this is one my husband came up with) leave a boot print behind for tracking just in case a search party is needed.

Pigspitter
August 31, 2007, 11:29 PM
When they started yelling "ALCHOHOL, TOBACCO, AND FIREARMS!" I thought they were making a delivery.
Around my parts they go ahead and call themselves CSR "Coors, Skoal, and Remington".
Anyway, I was hunting with a family friend one time and we got waved off Hisproperty by a poacher. I don't think he got any deer that day because we emptied our 1100's about 50 yards from his spot and then called the cops.

GRB
August 31, 2007, 11:36 PM
If you've already filled your tag shooting another critter and using my tag isn't only uncool it is illegal. Not necessarily so. For example , in NYS, a hunter legally can transfer his/her unfilled Deer management Permit (Doe Permit) to another hunter.

Aussie bloke!
September 1, 2007, 12:01 AM
G'day everyone,.....

What a great thread,....

everything said so far I can't find fault with,.

One thing also,....when you get back to camp or return to camp after 'going for a walk'....
WASH YOUR HANDS!!!!!! :fire:

Don't just stick ya dirty mitts into the fridge and grab food or drinks etc.
Nobody wants Dissentary!!

We always keep a bowl with water and disinfectant to wash your hands when you get back into camp,...
.you don't wash hands---you don't get fed!!!!!

Camp rules!
:neener:


Aussie.

MattB000
September 1, 2007, 12:18 AM
When they started yelling "ALCHOHOL, TOBACCO, AND FIREARMS!" I thought they were making a delivery.

I've always wanted to own 3 stores right next door to each other....

buck460XVR
September 1, 2007, 06:27 PM
good thread.....again, it seems anybody with any common sense would not need these suggestions, but most of us can identify with the aforementioned situations.

from Mrs. Hoppes....From the wife perspective:

Let your wife know where you will be hunting so if you don't return home at a reasonable time, she can tell the police where to start looking for your body.
good one...I also leave a map on the dash of the area I'll be hunting when on large tracts of public land. It helps to give them an idea of where to start looking.


On public land if you leave your portable temporary stand in a tree overnight, you DON'T have a reservation on that spot in the woods the next day, unless you're IN that treestand when another person shows up.
Here in Wisconsin, other than the Friday before opening day of regular gun season all treestands must be removed at the end of the day. If not, they are considered abandoned and the removal and/or use of such is deemed permisable. You can put them up in the morning and then leave them up until you return in the evening, but you must have your name attached and visible from the ground....again if not, they are considered abandoned This is to keep
some from posting their spot or reserving it as Loyalist Dave stated. I know of folk that have acquired a nice collection of tree stands over the years thanks to this rule.

...and last but not least, group hunting is legal here in Wisconsin for gun deer season too. But before you legally bag someone elses deer, you best have their permission first, at least in the group I hunt with.....and even with permission if you shoot two, you best be taggin' the little one or the gut shot one yourself and leave the better of the two for the other guy. Don't assume that everyone wants you to shoot their deer for them.....not at $100 bucks a crack for processing.


It's funny how many good friends I have that are not my hunting companions..............

krimmie
September 2, 2007, 10:50 AM
f you are deer hunting with a group (either dog or still hunting),
STAY ON YOUR STAND UNTIL RELEASED Almost shot a guy once because he strayed off assigned stand, then pulled out his hankie (white, of course) to blow his nose.

It's also important to know what you're shooting at! People get hurt because others fire at rustling bushes and white flashes.

Big Daddy K
September 2, 2007, 01:39 PM
Here ya go MattB

http://aycu19.webshots.com/image/26818/2002077914619898227_rs.jpg (http://allyoucanupload.webshots.com/v/2002077914619898227)

They also sell Beer, Diesel, and Gas.

countertop
September 2, 2007, 06:22 PM
Great Store - though these days the BATF is more or less known as Wal Mart

countertop
September 2, 2007, 06:24 PM
Another good safety tip (especially for those with a GPS and a tree stand) . . .

In addition to telling my wife where I am going and letting folks at deer camp know where I am, I also email my GPS coordinates to my wife when I get up in my stand.

That way, she knows pretty clearly where I am (she already has the GPS coordinates for my basecamp) and if I fell I am right there or if I shot a deer within a couple of hundred yards of there.

koja48
September 2, 2007, 08:27 PM
DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, eat my Twix candy bars! I brought elk pepper sticks to share . . . some things are sacred . . .

Pigspitter
September 2, 2007, 10:26 PM
DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, eat my Twix candy bars! I brought elk pepper sticks to share . . . some things are sacred . . .
I was always under the impression that if this law was broken, the victim is legally obliged to shoot the culprit.

koja48
September 2, 2007, 10:36 PM
Soaking their underwear & socks in a cold mountain stream has since been adopted as a "civilized alternative." Star-thistle pods in the toes of their hunting boots is optional, as is removing the toilet paper from the privy immediately prior to their next "moving experience." Lordy, I can be a rotten bastrich . . . but, if ya dance, expect to pay the fiddler . . .

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