Registered sear vs. registered receiver


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Father Knows Best
August 17, 2007, 02:40 PM
I have a PTR-91 and have been thinking about getting into the full auto game (legally, of course). What are the advantages and disadvantages of buying an HK or clone with a "registered sear" vs. a "registered receiver"? If I buy a "registered sear", will it work equally well in both HK91 and HK93 receivers? What about clones like the PTR and Vector? What about subguns like the MP5 and clones?

Yes, I know that I can only buy one that is on a Form 4. I know the process and cost.

Thanks

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MisterPX
August 17, 2007, 03:52 PM
A reg. rec. is just that, a receiver, good for that one rifle ony, in that one platwform.
A sear is in teh trigger pack, and you can switch it between any HK type rifle. A lot more versatile, hence, the lot more cost.;)

Father Knows Best
August 17, 2007, 04:15 PM
A lot more versatile, hence, the lot more cost.
Really? I've seen registered sears for sale for under $10k. Registered receiver converted HK91's, on the other hand, sell for $15-20k.

goldshlagerxx
August 17, 2007, 05:16 PM
There are fewer of the RR guns around hence the higher prices. If you're looking for a shooter a trigger pack registered in .308, .223 and 9mm would be the way to go. You could have a G3 host, HK93 host and an MP5 clone.

BTW, I thought ordinary citizens could just own C&R mg's in MN?

Check out Minn Stat 609.67 and let me know what I'm missing...

Trebor
August 17, 2007, 05:25 PM
I think goldshlagerxx might be right about Minnesota restricting you to C&R eligible only MG's. My home state of Michigan had the same restriction until recently and I seem to remember Minnesota being the "other" C&R only state.

Sounds like you need to check state law to make sure before making any other plans.

Hopefully we are both wrong and Minnesota residents can own any MG's because the C&R guns tend to be more expensive and the real "cool" guns, like H&K's, are NOT C&R eligible.

Chipperman
August 17, 2007, 06:00 PM
Really? I've seen registered sears for sale for under $10k. Registered receiver converted HK91's, on the other hand, sell for $15-20k.

Remember that the sear you are seeing for $10k is only for the sear. You have to shell out at least another $2000-3000 for the host, if you are using a factory HK.

Get the sear. You can use it in any other gun, and it's pretty much indestructible. The receiver is much more fragile. With a sear, you can have multiple machine guns for the price of one. You would not need any other NFA papers or fees unless one or more of the hosts are also SBRs.

Switching a sear from HK91 to HK93 is simple, and takes less than 5 minutes once you know what you're doing.

Father Knows Best
August 17, 2007, 11:13 PM
Dangit! Y'all are right about the "C&R only" thing in Minnesota. I knew Minnesota allowed machine guns and didn't allow suppressors, but I didn't know that the only machine guns allowed were C&R. That's a bummer. I lived in Tennessee until just last year. I guess I should have gotten a machine gun when I had the chance.

Trebor
August 17, 2007, 11:31 PM
You can still get a MG. Just get your C&R license first and shop around for a nice C&R subgun. Any "original" WWII MG should be C&R eligible. While Thompsons and MP 40's are prohibitively expensive, the .45 ACP Reisling SMG is still under $6K or so.

There are also newer MG's that are on the C&R list. For example, orignal Armalite AR-18 assault rifles are C&R eligible. I'm not sure on the prices on those right now though.

Be aware that you still are restricted to MG's registered in the NFA database before May of 1986. That means even if you found a 60 year old Thompson SMG in an attic somewhere, unless it was registered in the NFA database as a "transferable" MG prior to May of 1986, there is no legal way for you to own it. That's why a lot of old "war trophies" are getting destroyed as the vet's who brought them home die and the families find the guns.

You basically need to make sure the gun is both "transferable" and is listed as being C&R eligible. You need to watch out for guns that you think are C&R guns, but that were actually built up on new receivers. These are commonly called "tube guns." A "Tube gun" STEN or MP 40, for example, would not be C&R eligible.

Father Knows Best
August 17, 2007, 11:52 PM
I've got my C&R, already, and I know quite a bit about the legalities of full autos (not everything, obviously), 'cause my dad works for a gun shop in Georgia that specializes in machine guns.

He's been wanting to buy an MP40, anyway, so maybe I'll see if we go in on one 50/50. Good tip about the tube guns not being C&R, though. What about REWATS?

goldshlagerxx
August 18, 2007, 12:21 AM
As an aside, you could incorporate in an NFA friendly state and store the weapon there. It would be pretty easy to drop a sear in a safe deposit box at a bank. ND is good for sure (I live there), WI I'm not sure of...

MisterPX
August 18, 2007, 12:42 AM
Really? I've seen registered sears for sale for under $10k

Show me where. I'll snap one up in a heartbeat at that price. Sears are selling at 13.5 currently.;)

Neo-Luddite
August 18, 2007, 12:57 AM
What about REWATS?

Must have been a (free cost) registered DEWAT. If lawfully stamped, it can be "rewated" but the 200.00 must be paid and all other laws and NFA apply.

Consult ATF before acting--and maybe a lawyer.

Whitman31
August 18, 2007, 02:07 AM
Sorry, idiot here, what's C&R...

Father Knows Best
August 18, 2007, 02:22 AM
Curio & Relic. Certain firearms are classified by BATFE as curios and relics, so they are on what is known as the "C&R list." You can get a special FFL (federal firearms license) for collectors known as a "C&R FFL", which allows you to buy firearms that are on the C&R list without going through a regular dealer.

Some machine guns are classified as C&R. Only machine guns that are C&R classified may be owned by private citizens in Minnesota.

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