Walther P22


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mighty2
August 19, 2007, 07:53 PM
Does anyone out there have a Walther P22, if so what do you think about it.

Thanks

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knockonit
August 19, 2007, 07:57 PM
Have had one for quite awhile and run about 1k thru it, when it gets dirty if fails to fully eject an empty, clean it and it runs just fine.
I just bought a s & w, 22a, but haven't had a chance to shoot it yet.
I like the walthers, light, easy to acquire and when it runs, it runs
good luck with it
rj in phx.

trueblue1776
August 19, 2007, 08:00 PM
I've had mine since they were introduced (2002?), no probs with good ammo and cleaning.

Ragnar Danneskjold
August 19, 2007, 08:02 PM
I've got one, and it is by far my favorite gun to shoot.

mighty2
August 19, 2007, 08:04 PM
Thanks for the feed back, I am looking to get one this weekend. what about a reddot on one???

wally
August 19, 2007, 08:18 PM
Ours is a fun little gun and has worked well with the cheap ammo, but IMHO, they are a bit small for mounting a red dot on.

Best .22 for adding an optic is to me the Beretta Neos, with the S&W M22A in second place. Recent Ruger's with adjustable sights are drilled & tapped and come with a rail but doesn't give you many options to get the balance as you might like as does the Neos or M22A's full length rails.

I'd say get the P22 for a small plinker, but look to something else if you really want a red dot on it.

--wally.

mighty2
August 19, 2007, 09:48 PM
Longer barrel or shorter barrel???

trueblue1776
August 19, 2007, 09:55 PM
The "target" model front sight can shift as the gun wears. If you get the target model, move the front site to the spot on the slide.

kermit315
August 19, 2007, 11:39 PM
let you know in a week, thats when i get to pick my wifes up

GigaBuist
August 19, 2007, 11:55 PM
I might have a few posts on this board "defending" the P22 but to be perfectly honest:

It's a pain to disassemble and reassemble. I find it annoying.

Having the "target" model I find that my faux compensator block comes loose occasionally which means my front sight is floating around until I tighten it down.

The last time I took it to the range I switched ammo on it, running Federal Lightning, and it wouldn't feed more than 3-4 rounds without a malfunction. This pistol has already seen at least 2,000 rounds -- we should be past any break-in period. Worked fine the last time I took it out with Remington bulk-pack stuff though.

Slide refuses to lock open any more on an empty mag.

There has been at least two posts on here regarding a complete breaking of a slide on a P22 here.

I have twice been at the range with my P22 and switched pistols with somebody shooting a Ruger .22. In both instances I shot better with the Ruger than I did my own pistol.

In my early days of owning it I found myself frequently engaging the safety on accident. I have seen other shooters do this too. That's annoying.

The ONLY good thing this pistol has going for it is that the slide acts like a centerfire pistol. I bought it for that reason alone, to use as a training tool for myself and because it would give newbies I take to the range at least some semblance of a regular manual of arms before they transition to a centerfire. Big mistake. I don't have a single centerfire that has the issues that this pistol does.

The magazine release is pretty cool though. I'd like to see that catch on on other platforms.

When it works, it's fun. Unfortunately, it doesn't always work. And the slide might just snap in half on you.

evan price
August 20, 2007, 01:38 AM
I have had a p22 for over a year, fired many boxes of Wal*Mart Federal 550-bulk packs of ammo through it. Take it to the range every time. Been shooting a box a month lately since centerfire is pricey.

Re: the above comments:

1.It's a pain to disassemble and reassemble. I find it annoying.

Having the "target" model I find that my faux compensator block comes loose occasionally which means my front sight is floating around until I tighten it down.
Answer: Well, the long barrel/Fauxpensator is what makes it a chore to take down to clean. The 3.42" barrel model is simplicity, I can take it apart and put it back together again in less than a minute. The only "tricky" thing is actually to use the tool that comes with the gun to line up the recoil spring when you put the slide back on, the tool is a little plastic rod that if you didn't know better you'd think was a leftover piece of scrap.

2. The last time I took it to the range I switched ammo on it, running Federal Lightning, and it wouldn't feed more than 3-4 rounds without a malfunction. This pistol has already seen at least 2,000 rounds -- we should be past any break-in period. Worked fine the last time I took it out with Remington bulk-pack stuff though.
Answer: The P22 can be finicky with ammo, like any blowback gun can, I'll say that is true, but again, the $10 a box W*M bulk Federal has never caused me any trouble with CCI, Remington or Federal. I had a fail to feed the first round from a new magazine if you use the slide release, that went away if I slingshot the slide. Now with about 2000 through it that has gone away and it cycles like oiled glass. If you think a P22 is bad you should try a Jennings J22. However, mine is just fine.

3. Slide refuses to lock open any more on an empty mag.
Answer: Sounds like you wore out the plastic follower pin on the side of the mag possibly. Odd. Mine has no signs of wear here or in the slide and it never fails to lock open. Maybe more cleaning or more oiling?

4. There has been at least two posts on here regarding a complete breaking of a slide on a P22 here.
Answer: I bet there has; early P22s had problems that Walther has acknowleged ...and all Glock 40's kaboom, all beretta slides crack, etc. Again, with the early guns there were known problems but those bugs are worked out now. Would you rather have a S&W 22A and have to use a recoil buffer to keep the frame from cracking?

5.I have twice been at the range with my P22 and switched pistols with somebody shooting a Ruger .22. In both instances I shot better with the Ruger than I did my own pistol.

In my early days of owning it I found myself frequently engaging the safety on accident. I have seen other shooters do this too. That's annoying.
Answer: Sounds like the Ruger is the pistol for you, not a P22. Different strokes for different folks. And what, you think a Ruger is *EASY* to field strip and clean, easier than a P22??
How the heck do you "accidentally" engage the safety on the slide while firing? With what? Pulling it out of a pocket, maybe.

6. The ONLY good thing this pistol has going for it is that the slide acts like a centerfire pistol. I bought it for that reason alone, to use as a training tool for myself and because it would give newbies I take to the range at least some semblance of a regular manual of arms before they transition to a centerfire. Big mistake. I don't have a single centerfire that has the issues that this pistol does.
Answer: Odd, that's why *I* bought one, and so far have trained 4 people to shoot with it with no problems, except for one guy who kept forgetting the safety was on and wondered why it didn't fire. Again, I have no problems with mine and actually I haven't cleaned it for over 1000 rounds just so I can see what WILL be a problem. So far, no issues, and I have even taken to firing some nasty range-dropped misc .22's I pick out of the weeds with it to try to force a reaction. So far, it eats everything I can get into the chamber.

7. When it works, it's fun. Unfortunately, it doesn't always work. And the slide might just snap in half on you.
Answer: When it works, it's fun. Mine always works. And as for the frame "snap in half"... well, all Glocks KB. All Beretta slides crack and take off your face. All Taurus handguns jam. ETc ETc. Use good ammo and use the gun responsibly, buy a new model one and not a used one. The early ones had problems, yes. Newer ones, not.


The ONLY thing I can complain about is that in the short barrel a .22LR has not so much mass and it can be more difficult to keep on point of aim just because it is light and easy to move and the bullet itself is also light. At 30 feet I figure if I can keep 4" groups with concentration that's good for a plinker. I have targets that look like shotgun test group targets. But hey, it's great for training and triggertime and it's cheap plinking, and truth to be told, when I stop worrying about hitting bullseyes with it and instead focus on jumping pop cans and empty ammo boxes around on the backstop I can hit better than 50% of the time.

Roccobro
August 20, 2007, 04:03 AM
I've had my 3.4" model for over a year. Not a single jam(yet). Looking to buy a few more finger rest mags to make training more enjoyable.

I bought the P22 after a 6" NEOS, and I just picked up a Ruger 22/45. I shudder at having to disassemble/reassemble my Ruger again *without* a resource guide right next to me! The Walther is intuitive with centerfire pistol experience. The P22 has the best "feel" of the three so far.

Justin

Ragnar Danneskjold
August 20, 2007, 04:22 AM
I agree with evan. I bought the P22 as my first gun to get me aquainted with the feel of a centerfire pistol. It worked out nicely. I have since taken both of my parents and one friend shooting with P22 first, and then other pistols.

FieroCDSP
August 20, 2007, 06:48 AM
If you do get one, and fancy yourself an ameteur gunsmith, the P22 Bible has a lot of good info on making these thing work better. The biggest thing is the slide-wear from the trigger bar. A little stoning and resizing on the bar fixes it. It's not that it's cheap, it's that the machining is so rough. I've also heard of several stories of the extension popping off the 5" model. There are also two screws on both models that you HAVE to secure with loctite or they'll pop out.

I will say this: If you're looking for a cheap defensive practice gun, this is it. It's fun to plink with. But it's no Ruger in the accuracy department. I've had mixed luck with lead-nosed rounds, but no problems lately with jacketed or brass-coated Remington rounds.

Some like them, some don't. It's your choice. For a distance gun, go with a Ruger or Buckmark. For a plinker or defensive practicer, this one is good enough.

trueblue1776
August 20, 2007, 07:17 AM
it's that the machining is so rough.

????? Mine appears as though it was laser cut, my edges are super clean.

jamesb
August 20, 2007, 01:09 PM
My brother has one, once he found the ammo it liked, mini-mags, it ran pretty good. It was real selective and we had all kinds of feeding problems with all other ammo. You should hop on over to rimfirecentral.com, in the walther section they have a ton of information on the P-22. It wasn't the most acurate but it was fun to plink with.

FieroCDSP
August 20, 2007, 07:11 PM
Run your finger on the ears that are on the trigger-bar, Trueblue. Unless they've changed their machining practices, those ears will have sharp edges that are digging grooves into the bottom of the slide-edges. I know mine was like that. I made the fix and polished the damage up, and now it's fine.

trueblue1776
August 20, 2007, 08:47 PM
Fiero- Link to tutorial?

KINGMAX
August 20, 2007, 08:56 PM
I have a Walther P22 in the two tone green/black. It is a great shooter. I would like to get the short barrel.

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