Do you use the slide stop lever or slingshot method to return the slide to battery?


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JLStorm
August 20, 2007, 02:24 AM
Im just wondering which one you prefer. Im sure many of you practice both, but which is your most preferred method?

EDIT: To keep thinks simple, lets consider any manual racking of the slide, or variation of the slingshot method to be one in the same. I should have named the thread differently, but I cant change a poll and I tend to call any manual racking of the slide slingshotting, which technically is incorrect I suppose.

If you enjoyed reading about "Do you use the slide stop lever or slingshot method to return the slide to battery?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
pax
August 20, 2007, 02:45 AM
Neither. I use overhand most of the time.

pax

Ragnar Danneskjold
August 20, 2007, 02:48 AM
I use the slide stop mostly. When I am practicing quick relaods, I have the next mag in my weak hand, thus I hit the slide stop right after the mag goes in.

However, I have heard that in stressful situations, you lose the ability to utilize fine motor skills(which is what you use when hitting the slide stop). I was also told that it is wiser to just pull back on the slide, since that uses more basic hand motions.

Personally, I think that if you practice something enough, you can do it in a stressful situation.

JLStorm
August 20, 2007, 02:49 AM
Neither. I use overhand most of the time.

pax


I consider that a type of slingshot...I guess its not....

ok well since I cant change a poll lets consider the slingshot method any manual racking of the slide.

MPanova
August 20, 2007, 02:57 AM
On most of my guns I use the slide lock. I have a few where the slide lock is a bit out of reach so I use the sling shot or use my off hand to release the slide lock. It all depends on which gun Im shooting and what mood Im in.

FireArmFan
August 20, 2007, 03:12 AM
I use the slingshot method. The main reason for doing it that way is the fact that i'm left handed and the slide release is hard to reach and properly work. All the other reasons why people reccomend the slingshot method is just iceing on the cake. I did just buy a P2000 which has slide release on both sides but i have the slingshot method drilled into my mind through training i will continue to use that method.

Odd Job
August 20, 2007, 03:24 AM
Well, I have only two pistols: a Baby Browning and a Vektor CP1.
Slide stops? I don't need no steeeenking slide stops :neener:

Monkeybear
August 20, 2007, 03:36 AM
I use the slide stop. I don't even think about it, just happens every time I put a magazine in. The way I figure its just a half second or so quicker to use the stop than to use the sling shot. My thumb is already there. Its not tati-cool I'm just don't like waiting :p Maybe one day I will break a slide stop and then I'll consider changing to the slingshot. I'll buy a new slide stop and tell myself I have been using the slide stop way to long to change my ways.

pax
August 20, 2007, 04:01 AM
JLStorm ~

For purposes of the poll, sure. :) But (just for information, not to argue with you), "slingshot" describes a particular manner of grasping the slide in order to rack it manually. I'm not terrifically fond of the slingshot grasp because it just isn't that strong for me. Photos of both overhand and slingshot methods here (www.corneredcat.com/RunGun/rack.aspx).

I like the manual method rather than using the slide lock lever for several reasons:


I can always easily and quickly yank the slide on every gun I've ever handled, but I can't always easily or quickly find the slide lock lever with my thumb on an unfamiliar gun without both looking and thinking about it.
My thumb isn't always long enough to reach the lever and some levers are uncomfortably small to depress.
Sometimes, in some guns (especially when dirty), the manual methods feed the gun more reliably than the slide lock method.
Commonality of motion with clearing a jam allows my hands to function to load and clear jams without interference from my slow-thinking brain.

pax

bluecollar
August 20, 2007, 04:24 AM
Overhand

kir_kenix
August 20, 2007, 04:26 AM
i prefer to slingshot for initial loading (as opposed to locking the slide to the rear, then using the slide stop to load the first round). i just feel it is faster, as i can push the slide stop down with my thumb after locking the fresh mag in the well nearly simultaniously instead of adjusting by moving my weak hand to the rear of the slide.

Soybomb
August 20, 2007, 04:43 AM
However, I have heard that in stressful situations, you lose the ability to utilize fine motor skills(which is what you use when hitting the slide stop). I was also told that it is wiser to just pull back on the slide, since that uses more basic hand motions.
I've also heard people say that but to be honest I'm not sure how accurate they are. It seems to me if you have motor skills fine enough to work a trigger, and even press a magazine release, that using a slide stop lever should be at the least no harder.

M1 Shooter
August 20, 2007, 04:44 AM
I use the slingshot method.

It's called a slide STOP after all, not a slide RELEASE.

Well, some manufacturers may call it a release lever, but most manuals I've seen refer to it as a stop lever.

Ragnar Danneskjold
August 20, 2007, 05:03 AM
If it's not a slide release, why do most of them put grip serrations on it, like it's meant to be manipulate by the user? Or why not just make it internal?

Mikhail Konovalov
August 20, 2007, 05:31 AM
Neither.

http://i15.tinypic.com/4lj3p1w.jpg

Real men use their teeth!

MPanova
August 20, 2007, 05:38 AM
Most manuals I have read say to use it as a release. Of course I dont read all the manuals but like I said the ones I have call it a release. I was raised with my Dad calling it a slide "LOCK" because like a lock it has 2 uses or positions so to speak. It can be locked and unlocked. So when the slide is locked open you can depress it or unlock it to load a round.

M1 Shooter
August 20, 2007, 07:09 AM
If it's not a slide release, why do most of them put grip serrations on it, like it's meant to be manipulate by the user? Or why not just make it internal?

It is meant to be manipulated by the user, I use it to manually lock the slide open when clearing the weapon. However, there is no reason you can't use it to release the slide if you choose. I used to do it myself until I found out that using the slingshot method was more reliable in some pistols. I have had some pistols that wouldn't fully chamber a round out of a full mag when you just hit the slide stop lever, but they had no problem chambering that top round when using the slingshot method. Other pistols don't seem to care one way or the other, but I choose to just use the slingshot method exclusively for consistency, all that built up muscle memory comes into play to. Now I don't even have to think about it, I just automatically slingshot the slide when doing a reload

Some pistols do have internal slide stops with no lever. A couple examples are the Walther PP/PPK and the Kel-Tec P-32. With these pistols you have no choice but to slingshot the slide, yet another reason why I do it with all auto pistols.

Most manuals I have read say to use it as a release. Of course I dont read all the manuals but like I said the ones I have call it a release. I was raised with my Dad calling it a slide "LOCK" because like a lock it has 2 uses or positions so to speak. It can be locked and unlocked. So when the slide is locked open you can depress it or unlock it to load a round.

FYI, Browning, Colt, S&W, Glock, Ruger, Walther, and SIG all refer to it as a slide stop/catch in their manuals. The only ones I've seen that refer to it as a slide release is H&K and Kahr.

wally
August 20, 2007, 09:05 AM
Depends. Loading a cold gun with slide not locked back, I insert magazine and cycle (slingshot) the slide. Reloading a gun with the slide locked back I insert a fresh mag and hit the slide release with the off hand thumb after the mag clicks in.

--wally.

rbernie
August 20, 2007, 09:13 AM
My poor reptilian brain likes to remember things one way, and one way only. Given this - when the pistol fails to go BANG!, then it's time for a stoppage drill.

Cycle the slide to the rear if it's not already there and tilt the muzzle up. Drop the mag. Make a quick visual scan if you like to make sure the chamber is clear (altho I usually omit this step). Insert new mag. Slingshot the slide. Acquire target and pull trigger. BANG!

This works every time. It works on every form of semiauto pistol no matter where the controls are placed or shaped. Most importantly, it doesn't require that I remember multiple ways of doing things based upon any form of decision-making. (Hmm - am I out of ammo, or is a round stovepiped, or did a round inadventently trip the slide stop, is this a Glock or a 1911 or a BHP or Sig or...)

Running out of ammo is a stoppage. Treat it as such, teach yourself one way of dealing with a stoppage, and from then on any stoppage will get the same autonomic response without needin' to play lookie-feelie-twenty-questions with the weapon.

gbelleh
August 20, 2007, 09:23 AM
I manually release (some form of slingshot) the slide on everything except P7s where the squeeze cocker releases the slide.

GoRon
August 20, 2007, 09:45 AM
Slingshot

Hand strength isn't an issue for me having used hand tools as a mechanic my whole adult life, so I see no need to use the overhand.

Slingshot is a more natural motion to me. Being a more natural motion is good for when the adrenalin dump destroys your fine motor skills.

sansone
August 20, 2007, 09:55 AM
by hand.. what are you'all doing up at 2:30am??

Noxx
August 20, 2007, 10:08 AM
I use the slide release. It's one of the reasons I favor sigs, cause it's *right there*.

waterhouse
August 20, 2007, 10:45 AM
On everything but the P7, I slingshot. On the P7 I just squeeze, which I guess is using the 'slide release." I wasn't sure how to vote, so I didn't.

PPGMD
August 20, 2007, 10:54 AM
Depends on the gun.

USP Tactical 45: Slingshot, I can't reach the release levers
P99c: Slide stop
PPK: Slingshot for obvious release
P22: Slide stop
AR-15: Slide stop

DMK
August 20, 2007, 11:06 AM
For the same reasons as rbernie.

If you get a stovepipe or FTE, flicking the slide catch won't help you. If you practice slingshot all the time, it becomes second nature and works on every gun. Some of my guns don't have slide catch levers.

Plus I don't want to wear out that little notch.

CleverNickname
August 20, 2007, 12:43 PM
Overhand slingshot. Thumb-and-forefinger slingshot is awkward, doesn't provide as much grip on the slide and looks goofy. However I shoot Glocks most of the time and they have a tendency to drop the slide by themselves when a full mag is inserted so the vast majority of the time I don't even have to both with dropping the slide myself.

AndyC
August 20, 2007, 03:27 PM
Reloading - slide-stop.

Jam-clearance is a different animal.

Storm
August 20, 2007, 03:36 PM
When a round will be loaded into the chamber I slingshot it. When it will be closing on an empty chamber I slow up the slide by the grip of my hand.

SuperNaut
August 20, 2007, 04:30 PM
Clint Smith on the T.V. recommends slingshot, Correia in real life recommends slingshot, my habit is to use the lever (not really out of preference).

I know what I'm supposed to do, but some habits are very hard to break. Does anybody do Tap-Rack-Bang drills?

pax
August 20, 2007, 04:32 PM
Does anybody do Tap-Rack-Bang drills?

Yep.

Best way to combat a flinch is to mix snap caps in with live ammunition during your regular practice. You get in a bunch of reps clearing malfs (tap-rack-assess-bang), and work on your flinch at the same time.

pax

SuperNaut
August 20, 2007, 04:34 PM
Ah, that's a good idear Pax.

Soybomb
August 20, 2007, 06:00 PM
FYI, Browning, Colt, S&W, Glock, Ruger, Walther, and SIG all refer to it as a slide stop/catch in their manuals. The only ones I've seen that refer to it as a slide release is H&K and Kahr.
Does that really matter what they call it through? You seem to imply if they call it a slide stop, thats all it is to be used for.

From my walther P99 manual, loading section.
"Push down on the slide stop. The slide will snap forwarding, loading the chamber as it closes."

S&Wfan
August 20, 2007, 06:46 PM
I will NEVER, EVER use the slide STOP to release the slide in order to load a fresh round into my autos. I slingshot that sucker so it will go forward as quickly as possible but . . .

A DIFFERENT REASON THAN HAS BEEN MENTIONED YET . . .

I agree with the Tap-Rack-Bang drill and practice it often. I think it best if one ALWAYS slingshots the slide forward, rather than have different ways to do it in different situations. In a moment of mortal stress, your moves should be repetitive and based on instinct and simplicity!

HOWEVER . . . HERE'S THE DIFFERENT REASON . . .

ACCURACY!!!

Many automatics throw their first round to a different spot on a target, due to the slide speed being different as the gun initially goes into battery with a fresh round!

Have any of you ever had this problem?

You can generally solve this problem, and TIGHTEN UP YOUR AUTO'S TARGET GROUPS . . . by slingshotting the slide forward so the slide goes into battery much closer to the speed it does after shucking a fired round!!!

Thus, I shudder when I see someone ever-so-slowly release the slide STOP as they ALSO assist the slide forward by limiting it's forward speed with their hand!!! The poor cartridge just barely plops into place as the slide goes into battery.

Doing this will insure that your first round will not seat into battery the way it will normally after the first hot round is fired . . . and virtually assure you that your first round fired will NOT got to your normal point of aim spot.

If I ever have to use my autos for self defense, I want my first round to go DEAD ON to the spot I'm trying to hit.

SLINGSHOT THAT SLIDE . . . AND LET IT RIP FORWARD WITH MAXIMUM SPEED . . . so it seats firmly into battery like it does after shucking live-fired rounds.

DO IT FOR BETTER ACCURACY . . . IT MAY JUST SAVE YOUR LIFE!

Food for thought . . .

T.

pax
August 20, 2007, 06:59 PM
Good grief ... purple? All caps? Is this really THAT important?

*shakes head and wanders away*

:D

pax

Loyalist Dave
August 20, 2007, 07:08 PM
I was taught for many years to use the slide stop release. Then I switched as fine-motor-movements go to crap under stress, and my carry gun I can't modify like my 1911 to give it a robust, external, slide stop, so the sling-shot style for releasing the slide after reload was the better tactical choice. I think releasing the slide-stop is faster IF you have a robust, external slide-stop lever. I would prefer such.

LD

Lonestar49
August 20, 2007, 07:17 PM
...

I prefer using the slide release for the simple reason that it allows me to do it with, while having, a good 2-hand grip, while getting on target at the same time ~ faster ~ than taking the time to hold the gun one handed, and sling-shot the slide with the other hand, then getting a 2-hand grip and back on target, taking much longer.

I've never seen a bad shot because of this method, and if I do, it's because of an error on my part, not the action of the slide and its chambering of the first round, in simple truth, of what I've seen, a few times, out of 100's of shots per range visit with any of my guns.


LS

DoubleTapDrew
August 20, 2007, 07:30 PM
Many automatics throw their first round to a different spot on a target, due to the slide speed being different as the gun initially goes into battery with a fresh round!

Could you explain why? I haven't heard that before so I'm curious. It doesn't seem like the round would go any deeper or shallower into the chamber and the chamber isn't loose enough for it to wobble around side to side.
With most of my guns it seems like dropping the slide stop slams the slide home with as much speed and pressure as pulling it back another 1/4 inch and letting it go.
I should work on consistency and doing it one way or the other. For tap-rack-bang drills I always slingshot. For more casual shooting I use the lever about half the time and slingshot the other half. With an AR I always use the bolt release.

Chris Rhines
August 20, 2007, 08:31 PM
I always use the slide release. It's much faster and easier to perform under pressure, with wet or slippery hands, etc. Using the slide stop is also more positive - the tendency to unthinkingly ride the slide forward when racking the slide forward is difficult to train out, and this can lead to failures to go into battery.

I don't care for non-diagnostic weapon manipulation.

- Chris

brickeyee
August 20, 2007, 09:21 PM
The 1911 patent describes it both ways, and even describes using it to release the slide after loading a new magazine.
The thumb pad is there for a reason (at least Mr. Browning thought).

sdj
August 20, 2007, 10:33 PM
On the 1911: overhand. Interesting poll topic!

S&Wfan
August 20, 2007, 11:44 PM
Good grief ... purple? All caps? Is this really THAT important?

*shakes head and wanders away*



pax

Hi Kathy,

I guess I could have used pink or sumpthin' else. Nawww, not that important, I just like to use some space and color in my posts if I've posted a long answer. It helps "readability" . . . something I learned about writing for the old college paper way back in the early '70s. BTW, you have a really nice website and your use of colors, fonts and space makes it extremely readable too!

Last week in our little town we had the third assault on a lady within a couple of weeks, and it occurred across the street from my wife's business.

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Then the Sheriff announced a training class for ladies only to teach 'em firearms skills plus the legal and moral issues of defending oneself. Over 200 ladies have signed up already. They are required to bring their own firearm to the training, along with 100 rounds of ammo and they will also be taught a lot of the things you write about so well in your website.

My wife has always hated guns, but this incident across the street from her workplace really woke her up . . . and she even asked me to TAKE HER TO THE RANGE Saturday!!! I made sure to load some really nice, low power ammo so she'd truly enjoy the time we spent at the range.

We had a wonderful time . . . and then someone turned me on to your site!!!

I've got it bookmarked and I've shown it to her. You are a marvelous writer who writes with wonderful intellegence, warmth and humor. I read the whole darn site late into the evening and into the wee hours of the morning. GREAT STUFF!

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Thanks a lot!

Mantua
August 21, 2007, 01:12 AM
I use the slingshot method. Just seems simpler.

STAGE 2
August 21, 2007, 02:33 AM
Many automatics throw their first round to a different spot on a target, due to the slide speed being different as the gun initially goes into battery with a fresh round!

I'm going to raise a serious question mark on this one. Fliers have far more to do with shooter flinch than anything else. Add to that the difference in slide travel between the two can be measured in less than a milimeter on most pistols and I can't see how this is true. The bullet will not wedge itself any differently from one method to the next.

And for you naysayers out there, at least for 1911 buffs the slide release is exactly that, a release. The 1911 was designed to be used on horseback, which means one hand on the reins no matter what. This is the reason for the checkering on the lever and why the slide release is used to chember a round.

jungleroy
August 21, 2007, 03:12 AM
I am recently left handed, I now overhand with whats left of my right hand, it works well for me.

JohnKSa
August 21, 2007, 03:21 AM
Given that one of my SD autos doesn't have a slide stop lever, I always use the slingshot method to avoid training myself to hunt for something that's not there should I need to reload or drop the slide in an emergency.

gudel
August 21, 2007, 03:28 AM
I use both, whatever the easiest. For my GLOCKs and M&P, I use slingshot. For my HKs and Berettas, I use the slide stop.
They do the same thing, one method is easier on certain guns.
I like HK's slide release, they're huge :D

pax
August 21, 2007, 09:58 AM
Tom ~

:o

:D

Thanks for the kind words. You made my day.

pax

Bullseye57
August 21, 2007, 10:17 AM
Slingshot always. Well, almost always, I do use the bolt release on the AR because using the charging handle to close the bolt is awkward, especially when slung-in on the firing line. On the Ruger 22 Auto, using the bolt catch lever to load the pistol will cause the bolt stop to wear, roundoff, and eventually fail to lock the bolt rearwards. Pulling the slide/bolt fully rearward allows it to use full spring tension to load the weapon, just like it would naturally during firing operation.

R,
Bullseye

http://guntalk-online.com/images/guntalk_logo_sm.jpg (http://guntalk-online.com/forum/index.php)

Correia
August 21, 2007, 10:44 AM
Correia in real life recommends slingshot, Uh, actually it depends. When I'm teaching the new, and the average CCW class, then I teach slingshot, because it is a big, easy to use, gross muscle thing, and I've seen a lot of newer shooters really choke on dropping the slide with the release.

That said, personally, I use the slide stop. People that shoot a lot, (competition, training geeks, and I say that with love) are gonna use the slide stop. But since they've got 20,000 repititions, it works well. So it is one of those do what works for you kind of things.

I really don't think there is one perfect way to do anything. We're all coming at this from different backgrounds and levels of experience.

Bix
August 21, 2007, 10:51 AM
. . . training geeks . . . are gonna use the slide stop.

Not all of us. ;)

doubleg
August 21, 2007, 10:54 AM
I use the slide stop with my supporting hand while shooting my 1911. It just feels natural. Why mess up your grip when you don't have to.

pax
August 21, 2007, 11:16 AM
. . . training geeks . . . are gonna use the slide stop.

As Bix said, not all of us. ;)

pax

SuperNaut
August 21, 2007, 11:30 AM
Uh, actually it depends.

Yeah, T-R-B doesn't work very well on revolvers...;)

DogBonz
August 21, 2007, 11:32 AM
I voted manual, but if the slide is already locked back, then I use the slide stop. If the slide is in battery, but the chamber is empty, then I go slingshot.

Sorry, I know that me reply probably dosent help much.

sargenv
August 21, 2007, 11:35 AM
When I'm in slide lock for my 229, if I load the mag the right way, it loads itself meaning that I need not do anything but go back on target and start shooting again. Glocks can apparently do this also.

Correia
August 21, 2007, 11:44 AM
Well, I group myself in with the Geeks, so ya'll know what I meant. :p We're going to personally go either way, and do just fine, either way.

SuperNaut
August 21, 2007, 11:48 AM
I won't fight my habit then, despite what the T.V. tells me. :)

pax
August 21, 2007, 11:51 AM
Of course we knew what you meant, Correia, but you would hardly expect me to pass up a chance to yank your chain a little! ;)

pax

fletcher
August 21, 2007, 11:51 AM
I always use the slide stop lever unless the gun is empty.

Walkalong
August 21, 2007, 12:16 PM
I use both methods. I sometimes stick an empty brass case in the ejection port to practice clearing a jam, or manipulate a loaded round to stick chambering and practice clearing that. I don't do it much anymore, it is second nature. I rack the slide with the fingers of my left hand wrapped over the ejection port swiping out any obstruction rattleing around in there at the same time. My palm is on the other side and my thumb rides along the other side of the slide with the pad on the rear serrations. Or pretty close at least. ;)

Colt
August 21, 2007, 12:24 PM
Both.

I slide-release new guns and polymers, and sling-shot older guns or guns of higher value.

ceetee
August 21, 2007, 01:02 PM
I generally slingshot it. It just seems natural to thrust the pistol forward and let the slide slam shut at the same time I'm resuming my firing stance. Sort of halfway like the way I've read the Israelis draw from Condition 3.

By the way, Pax, that's a great article! I'ma have to make time to go through your site again.

molonlabetn
August 21, 2007, 01:03 PM
I use the over-hand technique, exclusively... the slide-stop is for manually locking the slide back. Some pistols will release the slide if the mag is seated firmly (I don't have any of those, and wouldn't depend on that), and some pistols (such as the 1911) are quite natural to release the slide by manipulating the slide-stop with the off-hand thumb... but, it makes more sense to confirm the gun is ready-to-go before the target is re-aquired.

critrxdoc
August 21, 2007, 06:12 PM
Have to admit that I was a slide stop kinda guy until I started shooting glocks. I asked myself why is this freak'in slide stop so small and how are u supposed to release the slide w/ this? Then I read about the "slingshot method" and it is easier to pull off even with adrenalin, easier on the thumb, and uses more large muscle memory than fine motor skill. Overall, I like it better now that I have gotten used to it.

Tom Servo
August 21, 2007, 09:36 PM
Um...I just push the cylinder in from the left. What is this "slide stop" thing you're all talking about?

:)

I was taught to use the slingshot method. As mentioned, it's good practice for failure drills, and when the stinky stuff hits the rotating apparatus, I'll still have the gross motor-skills to do the slingshot rather than having to fiddle with a tiny lever.

Redhat
August 21, 2007, 11:02 PM
As some have said, I recommend using which ever is best for that model pistol. Glock and others have a small slide stop so I would go overhand. Meretta 92...if you try overhand, watch out or you can activate the safety...ooops!:eek:

sig226
August 22, 2007, 07:11 AM
Since I've had to square off the slide stop notch on several people's autoloaders, I've taught myself not to use it for that. A lot of pistols have slide stops that are difficult to use, so teaching yourself to pull the slide back to release it ensures that you can operate any handgun you might find under pressure.

Then there are the ones that have not got an external slide stop, or release the slide by some other means. I like a method that works on everything.

jdmb03
August 22, 2007, 07:20 AM
I use overhand.

1911 guy
August 22, 2007, 08:27 AM
Returning the slide to battery under normal conditions, I use the slide stop. When clearing a malfunction or doing drills, I overhand it.

The slide stop/release was and is a perfectly acceptable method of returning the handgun to battery. This has become a topic of conversation only since the advent of pistols with vestigial controls. These are poorly executed designs, IMO, on a fighting handgun. If I have need to lock the slide to the rear and strip/reload, I want a working control, not some sheetmetal stub.

HorseSoldier
August 22, 2007, 10:06 AM
I use the slide stop/release. There's a reason why, with a proper two handed, thumbs forward grip, that you've got a digit parked right there to work the control.

I don't consider it a fine motor skill on a properly designed pistol, but I do think the vogue for slingshotting has something to do with the poor design of the factory stock Glock slide release. If you lack the fine motor skills to sweep your thumb downward, I'd question if you have the fine motor skills to find and engage a trigger.

Slingshotting (or any related technique), on the other hand, involves a lot of unnecessary movement of the non-firing hand. Time spent grabbing the slide instead of just flicking the slide stop/release is time that could be spent driving the gun back onto target and engaging.

4v50 Gary
August 22, 2007, 10:25 AM
Keep the drills few & simple. Rack it. Gross motor skill v. fine motor skill. Gloved v. ungloved.

ZXD9
August 22, 2007, 10:55 AM
I use slingshot because I'm left handed and the slide stop is not very convenient for me.

airwrench
August 22, 2007, 07:55 PM
I use overhand with my M&P, PT92 and 1911. Leaves my strong hand in position during competition and is easier for me to keep sights on target.

Xenia
August 22, 2007, 08:45 PM
I find it very very hard to use the "slide stop" lever. I am a lefty but my hands are very small too. So, I have no alternative then the "sling shot" method. (interesting term as I do it over hand myself.)

Kevin108
August 22, 2007, 11:47 PM
I practice slingshot with my Glocks but my 1911 prefers to be pampered and have the mag supported to chamber the first round so slide stop is the only way to pull that trick off.

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