C&R Colt and S&W Revolvers


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boogalou
August 30, 2007, 11:09 AM
I'm considering getting into collecting and shooting these old wheelguns and since I have very little experience in revolvers any tidbits of information or what to look for would be appreciated. I've already did some research on M&P's, Victory models, and early N frames, along with New Service and Police Positive Colts. Anything in particular worth looking for during the interwar or postwar period up to 1957 from these makers would also be appreciated. I plan on starting slow with the basic, more common models and go up from there. I'm more interested in the history of these collectible guns then their investment value. Or to put it another way, I don't have large amounts of disposable income. :)

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Novus Collectus
August 30, 2007, 11:14 AM
I hear the S&W 1917's made for Brazil are still affordable and are in your time frame criteria. They have a big Brazilian government seal on the side and I love mine. The action is smooth and it is still pretty accurate.
It is historic in the sense that it can fire .45 ACP or .45 Auto rim and the origional M1917's were made for the Army in WWI to make up for the lack of new 1911s.

MrBorland
August 30, 2007, 11:18 AM
For info vintage S&W revolvers, you need to get a copy of the Standard Catalog of Smith and Wesson. Chocked full of good info for the collector.


http://www.amazon.com/Standard-Catalog-Smith-Wesson-Supica/dp/089689293X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-0859979-3875861?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1188486742&sr=8-1

Old Fuff
August 30, 2007, 11:38 AM
A copy of Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson is a must.

Concerning a collection of S&W hand ejector revolvers for the budget buyer...

The more economical area to collect in is the K-frame Military & Police model (aka 1905 Hand Ejector) and the little I-frame .32 and .38 Hand Ejector (aka 1903 Hand Ejector and Standard Police). Both are going up, but good examples can still be found in the $200 to $400 dollar range. When you get into the big N-frame guns prices run two to three times higher, and often more.

As a rule of thumb, K-frame M&P revolvers with 6" and 5" barrels often run less then the more popular 2" and "4" lengths, while barrel length doesn't seem to make a lot of difference with the smaller I-frame revolvers - except for those that have the scarce if not rare 2" size.

45shooter
August 30, 2007, 12:31 PM
I would say you are about 20 years too late.

Back in the 80's and 90's when everybody was switching from revolvers to pistols you can find some really nice old revolvers for real cheap. I have several excellent or like newr condition Pythons, Diamondbacks, Detective Special, skinny barrel M&P revolvers, etc. that I got back then for about $125 up to $400 for the Python. Nowdays an excellent condition M&P from 50's will usually cost you $400 or more and Pythons are in $900+ range. Add original box/papers and you are looking at another $100 or more. I'm most surprised by how much Diamondbacks have appreciated in just last year or two.

If I were to start collecting now without too much $$$ I would look at M&P revolvers from 60's or later. Look for police issued models with appropriate markings as they are interesting.

Good luck.

Stainz
August 30, 2007, 12:42 PM
Four years ago, I gave up my quest for a 2" 10 - and bought a brand new 'closeout' 2" 10, made 1/03, from CDNN. The best used one I could find at a show then was a beater-grade - and marked $325. The new one, a 10-11 with MIM hammer & trigger and no IL, was $279.99 + $10 s/h. I also bought a similarly new 6" 66-6 - with a Redfield scope rail - for $349.99 - my best bargains ever. I still haven't found a 2" 10 for less than $325 - in fact, they continue to rise in 'value'. Even the 4" 10's, police rookie trade-ins, that did sell for $125-$200, are now $300-$400. The $75 I-frame .32's are gone... now think $400. Look for police guns...

Stainz

PS The blueing on the 2" 10 was/is exemplary... better than my old 24-3 - possibly better than my new Heritage 24. Still great - as is it's trigger - and accuracy. The 66, despite it's IL, is a keeper, too.

45shooter
August 30, 2007, 01:07 PM
Old Fuff,

As a collector, I'm much more interested in the 5" and 6" (3" too) barreled M&P than 2" or 4". I have least interest in the 4" model as they are most common followed by the 2" model. I'm also more interested in round butt than square.

Majic
August 30, 2007, 08:14 PM
With a limited budget I would pick just one revolver (probably a common service revolver) rather than several for now and learn about it. Many have so many variations people make collections based on just one model. Collecting classic S&W and Colts today (even the shooters) is not a cheap adventure today.

Stainz
August 30, 2007, 09:23 PM
Of course, if you want 'value' for your money - consider a revolver still available in decent shape for under a hundred bucks - in refurbished condition - with holster and other accessories. It was a military - and law enforcement - revolver - the marvel of Victorian engineering known as the 1895 Nagant. Go to gunboards.com to the name-specific forum for more info. Make sure your trigger finger is stout!

Stainz

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