State, Federal Authorities Team Up To Curb Illegal Gun Sales In City


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romma
September 4, 2007, 01:11 PM
New London — For one young man last spring, buying a . 357-caliber revolver in New London took just one phone call.

The would-be gun owner placed the call to a man he knew as “Low.” Then he drove to the area of Belden and Blackhall streets and picked up “Low,” a 27-year-old city resident whose real name is Kevin Shan, police said.

They went to Shan's apartment at 49 Connecticut Ave. The purchaser gave Shan $500 and walked away with a Smith & Wesson revolver, according to police.

Unfortunately for Shan, the man who bought the gun was a so-called “confidential informant” for the government who delivered the weapon directly into the hands of law enforcement authorities. Shan was charged earlier this month with illegal transfer of a pistol/revolver.

As part of an ongoing effort to take guns out of the hands of those who do not own them legally or use them judiciously, city police have been working with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and prosecutors in New London Superior Court. The joint effort began a few years ago when the level of street violence involving drugs and guns escalated.

Shan was targeted after the confidential informant told authorities Shan had three guns and was selling crack cocaine out of his residence.

When the informant called Shan about purchasing the revolver on May 14, the ATF was listening in. The informant drove to Shan's house in an ATF vehicle. The car was equipped with audio and video equipment and the informant was wired as well. The cash he used to purchase the gun came from the ATF.

Officers were watching as the informant went into Shan's apartment, and they saw him come out about four minutes later, according to an arrest warrant affidavit prepared by New London police Officer Brian Laurie. They followed the informant to a pre-arranged location and searched him. He told them the revolver was under an armrest in the front seat of the ATF vehicle. He said no paperwork was done on the transfer.

The history of the .357-caliber revolver remains uncertain. It was one of five handguns registered to a Waterford resident, but it had not been reported stolen.

Guns come from a number of sources, police and prosecutors said.

“They're coming in from all points,” prosecutor Michael Kennedy said. “The problem is that they're so omnipresent there is no one source.”

When a gun is seized as part of a crime, its history is traced through its serial number. Some guns are stolen, but others find their way to the streets through so-called “straw purchases.”

“People with a pistol permit will buy them legitimately and sell them to drug dealers,” said Capt. William D. Dittman of the New London police. Sometimes the handguns come from southern states, where they can be purchased over the counter, he said.

“It's usually anything they can get their hands on,” he said. A .22-caliber handgun can be had for $50 to $100, and somebody could spend as much as $900 or $1,000 for a .9 mm or .40-caliber pistol, Dittman said.

State laws carry mandatory minimum prison sentences for many gun offenses, and Kennedy said the state is less likely to plea bargain in these cases.

“We're less and less inclined to do that now because of the violence,” he said.

Shan, who also has pending narcotics and criminal impersonation cases in New London Superior Court, is being held on bonds totaling $210,000. Defense attorney Jason Westcott argued for a lower bond of $50,000 last week, saying that Shan, whose most recent address was 103 Colman St., is a father of two with strong local ties and that the case against him has holes. Prosecutor Paul Narducci said the state has the sale on videotape and alleged that Shan also sold a rifle to the confidential informant.

Long guns, because they are more difficult to conceal, are used less frequently in street crimes, but they, too, can be sold on the street. A couple of weeks before he sold the revolver to the confidential informant, Shan also sold the man a .223-caliber rifle and a few grams of cocaine for $1,700, according to police. The man went to Shan's residence and walked out with a Bushmaster Model XM15, the same type of gun that killed 10 people and injured three more in the Washington, D.C.-area sniper case in 2002.

The man told Shan he was buying the rifle for a friend, and Shan allegedly asked if they could rob the friend later. The man said no. Shan is not charged with the rifle sale because the law only applies to the illegal transfer of pistols.

On Thursday, as several of Shan's relatives sat in the court gallery, Judge Susan B. Handy, whose feelings about gun violence are well-known in New London Superior Court, refused to lower his bond.

“This isn't even a case about the defendant possessing a gun,” she said. “It's a case about him selling a gun. No one who sells guns is going to have a $50,000 bond.”

Shan is being held at the Corrigan Correctional Institution, and his next court date is Sept. 13. Since the local authorities have been working with the federal government, two New London prosecutors, Narducci and Kennedy, have been “cross-deputized” as federal prosecutors for cases that are tried in U.S. District Court. In some cases, the federal penalties involving gun crimes are stiffer.

“We try to find the bad guys, and then we worry after the fact about whether we are going to prosecute them in state or federal court,” U.S. Attorney Kevin O'Connor said.

http://www.theday.com/re.aspx?re=1b77869a-ed70-4240-92f0-5b7a75a3260f

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LaEscopeta
September 4, 2007, 01:18 PM
Not much to criticize, either in the actions of the authorities or in the reporting.

K3
September 4, 2007, 01:32 PM
So, are ftf transfers without paperwork verboten in Connecticut?

In Texas, I could buy a gun from 'Low'.

Colt
September 4, 2007, 01:34 PM
On Thursday, as several of Shan's relatives sat in the court gallery, Judge Susan B. Handy, whose feelings about gun violence are well-known in New London Superior Court, refused to lower his bond.

This was a bit of a slip by the author. The use of "Gun violence" is usually a dead giveaway by an anti who is trying to appear neutral.

Ghost Tracker
September 4, 2007, 01:45 PM
I'm all for enforcing both the State & Federal gun laws EVERYWHERE! But like K3's observation above, in Kentucky a face-to-face, private-individual to private-individual transaction between two residents of the Commonwealth of Kentucky requires nothing but the seller "not being aware" that the buyer is a convicted felon. No written bill-of-sale or FFL involvement is required at all. So, if "Low" had no previous felony convictions & wasn't aware that the buyer had any felony convictions or was from out-of-state...his actions were well within the law.

Master Blaster
September 4, 2007, 01:52 PM
Shan, who also has pending narcotics and criminal impersonation cases in New London Superior Court, is being held on bonds totaling $210,000.

A repeat habitual offender already out on bail for other crimes what a surprise!!!!!!!!!!!

90% of the shootings are perpetrated not by the gun, but by a repeat habitual criminal offender just recently released, previously arrested and out on bail. The other 10%, well the gun isnt growing legs for those cases either.

ITS the criminals STUPID.

romma
September 4, 2007, 04:03 PM
They are beginning to scrutinize Permit holders in CT for these straw purchases.

There is already the new Lost Or Stolen Law in CT, next they will try to take away or defacto Shall issue policy I am afraid.

On a side note, if the straw purchasers they do happen to catch get enough publicity with convictions and jail time, maybe the ones doing it will think twice.

30 cal slob
September 4, 2007, 04:19 PM
So, are ftf transfers without paperwork verboten in Connecticut?

Face to face transfers in CT are OK ...

1) Long guns - no "paperwork" restrictions, but State Police urge both buyer and seller to fill out and submit Form DPS3 (basically, registration).

2) Handguns - both buyer and seller must have valid CT pistol permits and the transaction has to be approved by the State Police (instant check of permits over the phone during regular hours). Both buyer and seller have to fill out two forms (DPS3 and DPS5, IIRC). One copy of DPS3 for each party and the State Police.

overall, not bad at all.

Standing Wolf
September 4, 2007, 04:20 PM
“The problem is that they're so omnipresent there is no one source.”

No, the problem is armed criminals.

K3
September 4, 2007, 04:24 PM
Face to face transfers in CT are OK ...

1) Long guns - no "paperwork" restrictions, but State Police urge both buyer and seller to fill out and submit Form DPS3 (basically, registration).

2) Handguns - both buyer and seller must have valid CT pistol permits and the transaction has to be approved by the State Police (instant check of permits over the phone during regular hours). Both buyer and seller have to fill out two forms (DPS3 and DPS5, IIRC). One copy of DPS3 for each party and the State Police.

overall, not bad at all.

It's all relative I suppose. :)

Mr Kablammo
September 4, 2007, 06:06 PM
With regards to #2: Feh. The 'law' itself is illegal. Feh, again.

Nomoney
September 4, 2007, 08:12 PM
The man went to Shan's residence and walked out with a Bushmaster Model XM15, the same type of gun that killed 10 people and injured three more in the Washington, D.C.-area sniper case in 2002.

OMG! apparently the XM15 doesn't need a shooter. It shoots people all by its self!:eek::eek:

MICHAEL T
September 4, 2007, 10:14 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
Originally Posted by K3
So, are ftf transfers without paperwork verboten in Connecticut?

Face to face transfers in CT are OK ...

1) Long guns - no "paperwork" restrictions, but State Police urge both buyer and seller to fill out and submit Form DPS3 (basically, registration).

2) Handguns - both buyer and seller must have valid CT pistol permits and the transaction has to be approved by the State Police (instant check of permits over the phone during regular hours). Both buyer and seller have to fill out two forms (DPS3 and DPS5, IIRC). One copy of DPS3 for each party and the State Police.

overall, not bad at all.




Not bad I think terrible I am thankful more and more I live in a free state and can buy and sell face to face as I please. In about 1984 we out lawed any registeration of firearms in Ky except for the federal paper work. Got rid of the Lexington, Louisville , little police permit /registeration scam . You all should try it . We have a lot less crime in our gun free state.

Today in about 10 min. I sold a 1911 GOVT face to face to 1 guy and turned around and bought another1911 (compact) from a different person. I cleared $400 on the deal and got a compact, I will go looking tommrow to see what I can trade or buy. No fuss no muss and no dam paper work.

IA_farmboy
September 5, 2007, 12:19 AM
Let's see if I got this right. The people make laws heavily restricting the sale, ownership, and manufacture of an item. They become concerned over the sale and trade of these items. Then go about creating stings to enforce these rules.

I have to wonder what is worse, the trading or the rules restricting the trade.

I know this is generally off topic for this site but they make a connection to illegal trade in drugs. I have to wonder if the gun and drug crimes are actually driven by the laws restricting their trade. I don't see people shooting each other over alcohol (well, not for some time anyway), Tylenol, or tobacco. Perhaps it's because all of those are readily available at the Hy-Vee down the street.

Why should I care if some yahoo wants to get numbed up with codeine once in a while? Let the guys and gals buy it in the store, put Surgeon General warnings on it, regulate its purity, tax it until it costs ten times to buy what it costs to make, and keep it out of the reach of the youngsters until they are old enough to ruin their own lives. That way the losers aren't fighting over it and know what exactly they are buying. It works for tobacco and alcohol, perhaps that idea will work for marijuana, opiates, or whatever else kids these days want to use.

Perhaps my thoughts aren't the most popular but it seems making some laws restricting our choices only gets more people into more trouble. I think these "lawmakers" need to practice some restraint and abolish some of the laws they made rather than continue to pile them higher and deeper. I guess we should stop calling them "lawmakers" and use a better term so they don't feel the need to live up to that name.

I'll end my rant on all these restrictive laws by asking, what happened to "land of the free"?

Geronimo45
September 5, 2007, 01:00 AM
Shan was targeted after the confidential informant told authorities Shan had three guns and was selling crack cocaine out of his residence.
I guess that's what they call 'diversifying your portfolio'.

romma
September 5, 2007, 09:00 AM
The man told Shan he was buying the rifle for a friend, and Shan allegedly asked if they could rob the friend later.

This dude Shan has some guts, selling an AR-15 knock off ( I own one myself) to a customer and trying to plot robbing him later.

It would almost be comical to see this Shan character attempt to inflict a home invasion against anyone halfway competent with it's use...

oldgold
September 5, 2007, 09:40 AM
criminal impersonation


WTHF

How do you impersonate a criminal ?

Isn't that the same as being a criminal ?

Inquiring minds wanna know.

romma
September 6, 2007, 11:35 AM
How do you impersonate a criminal ?


Answer: A Richard Nixon Rubber Face mask...

Oh, wait, sorry, he was not a crook! :evil:

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