I cant carry in these states, should I even bother trying for a permit?


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JLStorm
September 4, 2007, 06:25 PM
The states in red on the attached map are states that I cannot carry in. Many of them are may issue, one or two is shall issue with funny rules, and a few no issue. I would appreciate the input of anyone who has any knowledge of these, especially the may issue states let me know if its even worth trying to get a permit or if they will just say no unless I know someone.

If you cant see the map, the states I cant carry in that issue non-res permits are:
OR NE, IA, NY, SC, MA, RI, NJ, MD.

EDIT: It looks like NJ, NY, MD don't give out permits unless your special so they are out.



I travel to all of these on a regular basis so if I could get a permit it would be great.

Thanks for any help.

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Librarian
September 4, 2007, 06:50 PM
California has no reciprocity and does not issue to out-of-state residents. You'd have to be a resident, and since you're smart enough not to do that, you probably should write off carry in California.

granuale
September 4, 2007, 06:54 PM
Wow you really travel to all of these on a regular basis? If you plan to carry there anyway, then yes definitely apply. If you're ever busted for carry in any of those jurisdictions and decide to fight the charge you or your attorney can then argue that you tried your very best to obtain permission to be able to defend yourself.

If you will not carry where you don't have prior approval to do so hopefully people can answer about your likelihood on a state by state basis. I can confidently say you will not get one in N.J. absent some major political pull.

Scott

Jorg Nysgerrig
September 4, 2007, 06:56 PM
I believe you're out of luck for WI and IL, no permits there.

nplant
September 4, 2007, 06:57 PM
CA - If you're not a state resident that lives in one of the easier-to-get counties, forget it. At best, you *might* get a house in a good county, and convince the local sheriff of the county you travel to most that your business is a high-value one (you're a jeweler that carries gems or precious metals, or a technical repair person that carries LOTS of high-value technology around) and *perhaps* get that sheriff to grant a permit, but then it would probably be restricted to that county only, and possibly only within certain hours. Best of luck to you.

JLStorm
September 4, 2007, 07:02 PM
Thanks guys I took CA, IL, WI out, I also took DC out because I know there is just no chance of that happening either.

Bruce333
September 4, 2007, 07:10 PM
No non-resident permit in HI either. Actually, no permits period!

U.S.SFC_RET
September 4, 2007, 07:15 PM
You can drop Maryland off of your list as well. They will take your money and application but you won't get a concealed carry permit. Regardless if it is a may issue state or not.

zoom6zoom
September 4, 2007, 07:29 PM
Yeah, MD only rarely issues even to residents. I know ONE person with a permit in MD, and he's had it over twenty years. Don't waste your time.

From my research, MA isn't too hard to get as a non-res (some say it's easier for a non resident than a subject) but is very $$$$, hundred bucks per year, and only good for a year.


SC doesn't issue non resident permits, or recognize NR's from the states they do honor.

Threeband
September 4, 2007, 08:10 PM
Yes, forget about Maryland, unless you can cultivate a relationship with the right politicians. ($$$$$$$)

geekWithA.45
September 4, 2007, 08:14 PM
You can forget Jersey.

T'aint gonna happen.

-You are leaving the American Sector-

Cacique500
September 4, 2007, 08:21 PM
You can get a SC permit, but if I remember correctly to you have to own property there. There is a bill currently making it's way through the legislature that will take reciprocity decisions away from S.L.E.D. and make SC recognize any state that recognizes them. Rumor says it has a good chance of passing.

It's the only "local" state I can't carry in and it makes me crazy to take my gun out of my holster and put it in the glove box when I cross the border...stupid!!

If you figure out Oregon, let me know.

Big Mike
September 4, 2007, 08:28 PM
Having carried in Oregon for several years, you must live in a contiguous state (a state that shares it borders) to get a non-resident permit there. They honor no permit other than their own. It is also at sheriff discretion, but in most counties it is pretty much shall issue. If you're in CA, ID, NV or WA you may be in luck. If not...

Hoppy590
September 4, 2007, 09:17 PM
MA is actualy good for out of staters. where as residents apply to the local COP out of staters apply directly to the state police. and they are more likely to issue than most of the towns around here

ADKWOODSMAN
September 4, 2007, 09:23 PM
I believe your out of luck in NY. I've never heard of anyone with a nonresident permit.

Juna
September 4, 2007, 09:33 PM
What state do you live in? It looks like you may be better off than me, except in SC. Here's the map of Michigan's reciprocity:

For those who can't see the graphic, I cannot legally carry in:
CA, OR, HI, NV, NE, IA, IL, WI, NY, ME, RI, MA, CT, NJ, MD, DC

And WV says, "Pending approvals," whatever that means.

http://www.mcrgo.org/mcrgo/img/mcrgoreciprocity.gif

JLStorm
September 4, 2007, 09:57 PM
What state do you live in?

I have PA, NH, ME, CT, NV, FL, UT permits. I reside in PA on most weekends but I am everywhere else during the week. The NH permit is now redundant, but every other permit I have gives me a few more states here and there.



Thanks so far guys, I have crossed NJ, MD, and NY off my list. I had heard a while ago that NJ and MD were about impossible to get but I forgot about that. As far as HI, I can live without that one as I have only been there twice, I dont know why I left that one on there.

strat81
September 4, 2007, 10:49 PM
NE only issues to residents. NE also does not recognize any other state's permit.

AntiqueCollector
September 4, 2007, 10:54 PM
To get technical about it, WI is open carry legal, you'll just likely get harrassed by LEO's from what I understand...so do so only if you're willing to accept the risk of getting arrested...

MRIman
September 4, 2007, 11:03 PM
Kiss NY off your list unless you live in upstate.

MRI

S&Wfan
September 4, 2007, 11:14 PM
You can get a SC permit, but if I remember correctly to you have to own property there. There is a bill currently making it's way through the legislature that will take reciprocity decisions away from S.L.E.D. and make SC recognize any state that recognizes them. Rumor says it has a good chance of passing.

It's the only "local" state I can't carry in and it makes me crazy to take my gun out of my holster and put it in the glove box when I cross the border...stupid!!

I too live in Georiga and travel five states on business occasionally. It drives me nuts also to have to unload my firearms and stow 'em in the trunk before going into South Carolina.

Heck, I even leave my preferred, and expensive 1911 at home, rather than have it stolen (confiscated) by some local Sheriff.

Georgia has no reciprocacy with SC simply because SC's laws say that they only reciprocate with states with equal, or more stringent CCW qualification rules than theirs.

Ironically, if I lived in SC I'd instantly qualify for a resident license due to my military training, membership in a shooting club, and several other factors.

That's what's so crazy about the various CCW gun laws. IMHO, these laws should honor other state's licenses just like they do for out-of-state drivers licenses.

Maybe one day . . .

T.

PS: What's the deal on owning land in SC allowing an out-of-stater to get a CCW license there? How much land do you have to own? Could I buy a square foot or so from some kind soul and then qualify?;) I'd surely like to be able to protect myself when I cross the river!!!

T.

Cacique500
September 5, 2007, 08:31 AM
What's the deal on owning land in SC allowing an out-of-stater to get a CCW license there?

I tried to find the specifics last night but couldn't. If you look up the non-resident app form you'll see it pertains to property. I was thinking the same thing...get 20 people to go in on an acre of swamp land and be done with it. :D

What I don't understand is why SC and FL don't reciprocate - very similar training requirements - unless there's some small detail I'm missing. Anyway, of all the places for my parents to retire, they sure picked the WRONG state for CCW!

Glad this thread came up thought - I thought my FL was valid in WA state and I carried there for a few days last winter and after rechecking the maps...well.....oops. Won't make that mistake again... :o

zoom6zoom
September 5, 2007, 08:39 AM
What I don't understand is why SC and FL don't reciprocate

Maybe they can't find themselves on a map.

30 cal slob
September 5, 2007, 09:06 AM
Rhode Island and Massachusetts are DOABLE as a non-resident.

The former - read the application and the issuance criteria carefully.

Application here:

http://www.riag.state.ri.us/criminal/bci/forms/pistol_instructions.pdf

A great RI resource (go to the message board):

http://www.cralri.com/

The latter - ditto - and be prepared to shovel out $150/year to get a Class A LTC for All Lawful Purposes. Another great Mass resource:

http://wwww.goal.org/PDF/nonres.pdf



rotsa ruck.

JoeHatley
September 5, 2007, 01:42 PM
Iowa info here: www.iowacarry.org

I an not certain, but I believe Iowa has no reciprocity and does not issue to out-of-state residents.

Joe

B. Adams
September 5, 2007, 02:28 PM
Last I knew, Iowa does issue to nonresidents, but as hard as it is for a resident to get one I don't know what your chances are. Iowa nonresident permits are obtained through the Commissioner of Public Safety.

Good luck. For a central midwestern state they have terrible gun laws.

W.E.G.
September 5, 2007, 02:39 PM
You can get a SC permit, but if I remember correctly to you have to own property there. There is a bill currently making it's way through the legislature that will take reciprocity decisions away from S.L.E.D. and make SC recognize any state that recognizes them. Rumor says it has a good chance of passing.


I sure hope so.

It annoys me to no end that I have to be disarmed when I go to visit family there.

Muzzy_B
September 6, 2007, 04:48 PM
What I don't understand is why SC and FL don't reciprocate - very similar training requirements - unless there's some small detail I'm missing. Anyway, of all the places for my parents to retire, they sure picked the WRONG state for CCW!

From what I can tell from recently going through the process of applying for my out of state Florida permit is, SLED won't recognize a Florida permit because Florida doesn't require a class room course with a written test and range test as part of the CWP application process. Instead they only require proof of training (which in my case was a hunter's safety certificate from 15 years ago involving no handgun training whatsoever), or one of the few other listed documents.

When I took my SC CWP course, there were people in the class that had never touched a handgun before. At one point I refused to step onto the range with one of the qualifiers because I was literally afraid of taking a hit from a stray. Nonetheless, she paid her hundred bucks so she was allowed to complete the course. We all passed our "exam" and nobody failed during range qualification (including the previously mentioned individual) so we're all licensed to carry now.

There is a bill currently making it's way through the legislature that will take reciprocity decisions away from S.L.E.D. and make SC recognize any state that recognizes them. Rumor says it has a good chance of passing.

Great. Maybe I should cancel my $117 check if it's not too late and wait on the politicians to decide.

JLStorm
September 6, 2007, 04:53 PM
From what I can tell from recently going through the process of applying for my out of state Florida permit is, SLED won't recognize a Florida permit because Florida doesn't require a class room course with a written test and range test as part of the CWP application process. Instead they only require proof of training (which in my case was a hunter's safety certificate from 15 years ago involving no handgun training whatsoever), or one of the few other listed documents.

I dont know if that is the reason, I have my NV permit which requires more training and qualification than any other permit I have heard of, especially if you want to carry in clark county (vegas). SC doesnt have reciprocity with NV either though.

javacodeman
September 6, 2007, 05:04 PM
PS: What's the deal on owning land in SC allowing an out-of-stater to get a CCW license there? How much land do you have to own? Could I buy a square foot or so from some kind soul and then qualify? I'd surely like to be able to protect myself when I cross the river!!!


I'll look into "how much it takes" and I'll also ask my friend (who is a realtor) what kind of contract could be worked out to CYA all parties involved.

If these things work out, I'd be willing to part sovereignty over a few square inches of my yard.

As far as NV goes, IIRC, SC only reciprocates with states with equal or more stringent training (previously mentioned) and with states that also honor their license. Maybe the problem lies with NV instead of SC.

I'll read up and make a few calls and post what I've learned.

java

javacodeman
September 6, 2007, 05:08 PM
Okay, after a quick check, it seems like any amount is enough:

SECTION 23-31-210. Definitions.

As used in this article:

(1) "Resident" means an individual who is present in South Carolina with the intention of making a permanent home in South Carolina or military personnel on permanent change of station orders.

(2) "Qualified nonresident" means an individual who owns real property in South Carolina, but who resides in another state.



Edit Update (to avoid a triple post--hey I got the answers faster than I expected :) ):
I talked with my friend, he advised that restrictions on buying unaddressable parcels of land have tightened in recent years due to some water access scams. Anyways, he advised what someone else has already suggested that is to get several people together. Those people would purchase some small quantity of land that is addressable. These people would legally be "joint tenants". Ownership of this land would pass to heirs and the list of "joint tenants" could be expanded or lowered based on the initial contract entered into by those tenants.

You'll probably not want to buy this land in my area as there is a lot cheaper land in other parts of the state. Otherwise, I'd offer up my friend's services.

Hope this helps!

java

Prince Yamato
September 6, 2007, 09:25 PM
The only way you can have a pistol in NYS in your possession while not traveling is to be a resident of NYS. Period. There is no non-resident pistol permit because you need to be a resident of NYS to even POSSESS a pistol within the state. So cross off NYS.

Condition Plaid
September 7, 2007, 03:39 AM
CA - If you're not a state resident that lives in one of the easier-to-get counties, forget it. At best, you *might* get a house in a good county, and convince the local sheriff of the county you travel to most that your business is a high-value one (you're a jeweler that carries gems or precious metals, or a technical repair person that carries LOTS of high-value technology around) and *perhaps* get that sheriff to grant a permit, but then it would probably be restricted to that county only, and possibly only within certain hours. Best of luck to you.

Many counties in California are nowhere near as bad as described above. Several counties, mostly rural, accept a desire for personal protection as the required 'good cause' for issuance. Orange County, with over 2 million residents, is not that easy, but you sure don't have to be a jeweler or a political contributor to be issued a CCW. I'm neither and was issued with little trouble and with no restrictions as listed above.

Futuristic
September 8, 2007, 06:23 AM
Prince Yamato wrote:
The only way you can have a pistol in NYS in your possession while not traveling is to be a resident of NYS. Period. There is no non-resident pistol permit because you need to be a resident of NYS to even POSSESS a pistol within the state. So cross off NYS.


Not that it is terribly relevant to the thread, BUT just to be pedantic, there are 2 (at least) EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES where Non-Residents may Possess Handguns in New York State.

To wit:
A member or coach of an accredited college or university target pistol team may transport a handgun into or through New York to participate in a collegiate, Olympic or target pistol shooting competition provided that the handgun is unloaded and carried in a locked carrying case and the ammunition is carried in a separate locked container.

And:
Non-resident target shooters may enter or pass through New York State with handguns for the purposes of any NRA approved competition if the competitor has in his possession a copy of the match program, proof of entry and a pistol license from his state of residence. The handgun must be unloaded and transported in a locked opaque container.

Futuristic

Rustynuts
September 8, 2007, 09:02 AM
THIS is why we should have a NATIONAL law permitting the castle doctrine AND CCW and carrying on private/business property. Let the States still do the actual licensing and their own background check if they want (Florida does that now). That way everybody wins and the States still get the money for permits. Wonder if that could ever happen?

Prince Yamato
September 8, 2007, 06:16 PM
Not that it is terribly relevant to the thread, BUT just to be pedantic, there are 2 (at least) EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES where Non-Residents may Possess Handguns in New York State.

That's a good point as well. I'm also a big fan of dispelling myths about NYS gun laws :D

U.S.SFC_RET
September 8, 2007, 07:33 PM
Isn't it amazing that every state that borders Maryland allows concealed carrying rights and I am not talking about carrying money for a business here.
Other states trust us more than the State itself.

Crunker1337
September 8, 2007, 07:47 PM
Rather than deny yourself the ability to personal defense, why not avoid those states?

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