What am I doing wrong?


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ED21
September 5, 2007, 11:17 PM
Here are a couple pictures of a target from a recent range trip with my new Kimber pro CDP II. The targets are of four mags of 230 gr fired from 15 yards.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid225/p86bb1bd745e49c80e5b9a0807e90681a/e7d41fc6.jpg

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid225/peadbe98aada7e39b9bf28564a2e31403/e7d41fc3.jpg

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browningguy
September 5, 2007, 11:20 PM
Well the sights may need a little adjustment. Alternatively you may be pushing when you pull the trigger, assuming you're right handed. But it is very consistant so I want to guess sight adjustment.

Nothing wrong with the grouping, isn't that one of the compact models?

nwilliams
September 5, 2007, 11:54 PM
Its always difficult to tell just from looking at targets, but based what info there is it looks to be a possible eye dominance issue. Make sure you know which is your dominant eye and be sure that you are focusing on the front sight with that eye.

The most common thing I see among students when their shots all go to the left is that they are right handed and left eye dominant and don't know it. Many people assume that because they are right handed that they are automatically right eye dominant. I happen to have a cross dominance line of sight, I'm right handed but left eye dominant.

There are ways to test for this, point at something with both eyes open and then close one eye and see if your finger moves off target. If you're having issues on the range try shooting with your weak hand and see if that helps bring you back into alignment. Whenever I'm having trouble I shoot a mag or two holding the gun in my left hand, this makes you stop and focus on the little details such as grip, trigger control and sight alignment. I've see many people shoot more accurately with their opposite hand, and the look on their faces is priceless when the shot goes exactly where they want it:D

This is only a guess it looks like a sight alignment problem however without watching you shoot its hard to make a good analysis. Good luck, I'm sure you'll figure it out sooner or later.

rady8um
September 6, 2007, 12:08 AM
This poster was posted by a member of PAFOA. Maybe it can help you figure out what's going on. Good luck.

Steve C
September 6, 2007, 12:52 AM
One of the first things I do with any new gun is to shoot it from the bench at a 25yd target at 25yds away. This tells me where the gun shoots with minimum aberrant input from me when shooting. If needed the sights are adjusted till the rounds land center target from the bench. After I'm confident I know where the gun shoots, unsupported practice is an effort to reproduce the bench rest accuracy.

glockman19
September 6, 2007, 01:02 AM
I think you are shooting well. nice groups. You're killing whatever you're aiming at. As others have said sights might me slightly off but I'd say with the 4" barrel of the Pro model and the short sight line you're shooting well.

10-Ring
September 6, 2007, 01:24 AM
At fifteen yards, not knowing you or the firearm very well, I'd go ahead & blame the ammo ;)

RPCVYemen
September 7, 2007, 05:08 PM
This poster was posted by a member of PAFOA.

I have a follow up. I have a Blackhawk, and I kept shooting high to the left. I kept studying one of those charts, and tried to figure out what I was doing. Finally, I adjusted the sights, and now my groups are centered on the target.

So the dumb question is: Is it possible that I am "Heeling" or "Anticipating Recoil", and I have just adjusted the sights to accommodate that bad habit?

How would I be able to tell whether sights were right on, and I was "Anticipating Recoil" or the sights were off, and I was not "anticipating recoil"?

Does it make any difference?

Mike

RockyMtnTactical
September 7, 2007, 05:20 PM
Assuming that the weapon and ammo are in good working order, I would say that you are anticipating the shot to some degree.

CountGlockula
September 7, 2007, 05:23 PM
two words: Trigger control.

Relax and slowly press on the trigger.

Rexster
September 7, 2007, 05:29 PM
This could be a trigger control issue, or could be sight alignment. Is this your first 1911 pistol? If not, is it set-up different, regarding grip panel width, trigger length, mainspring housing type, or grip frame length?

tacmedicp94
September 8, 2007, 10:58 AM
Try getting some snap caps. I think I payed $10 for 5 at Midway USA. Next time you goto the range, load your mag with the snap caps randomly intermixed with live rounds. Start shooting, if you're anticipating or pushing the gun it will show when you get to the non firing round. The snap caps are also good for dry firing practice.

Ken C
September 8, 2007, 11:06 AM
"The most common thing I see among students when their shots all go to the left is that they are right handed and left eye dominant and don't know it. Many people assume that because they are right handed that they are automatically right eye dominant. I happen to have a cross dominance line of sight, I'm right handed but left eye dominant."

This is a problem I have as well. What do you do to correct ?

Ken C

Don Worsham
September 8, 2007, 12:31 PM
Ken C posted:
"The most common thing I see among students when their shots all go to the left is that they are right handed and left eye dominant and don't know it. Many people assume that because they are right handed that they are automatically right eye dominant. I happen to have a cross dominance line of sight, I'm right handed but left eye dominant."

This is a problem I have as well. What do you do to correct ?
>>>

With a handgun shoot with both eyes open, the dominate eye will take over. With a rifle I close my dominate left eye which forces the right eye to work hardered.

RonE
September 8, 2007, 08:32 PM
What are you doing wrong? Everything! You are looking for more opinions than you need to get in the X ring. 50 shots......adjust the sights a little (DUH). If you have fixed sights, hold a little low and a little to the right.

Kevinch
September 11, 2007, 09:59 PM
Here's a good way to see if you are flinching when you pull the trigger:

Load up 5 live rounds in the Blackhawk, and 1 fired case. Spin the cylinder so you don't know where the fired case is at.

Now start shooting in a controlled, carefully aimed manner.

If you are flinching, you'll see it easily when you pull the trigger on the empty.

WuzYoungOnceToo
September 11, 2007, 10:13 PM
Clearly those are defective targets.

Archie
September 13, 2007, 05:04 PM
ED21, if you are heeling, or antipating the shot, or bucking or flinging or whatever - your groups would be oval or strung out in that direction.

Your groups are essentially round. That means you are doing just fine. Except for the two or three shots off the main body of shots - those you just lost sight of the tip of the front sight blade.

All you need to get centered is to go about two clicks right and one click down and fire 10 more careful shots. If you have fixed sights, take a plastic or brass drift, a ball peen hammer and give the rear sight one gentle whack to the right; and then hold lower.

Move out to twenty-five yards and shot another ten or twenty careful shots like you did these. See how those register on the target and keep watching for stringing of impacts or oval shaped groups. Ovals indicate some improper trigger technique.

Looks to me like you're doing fine. Keep up the technique and extend your distances for practise.

W.E.G.
September 13, 2007, 05:08 PM
Those "sight charts" only explain shots that are OUTSIDE your group.

It is highly unlikely that your tight-knot group is off to one direction or another because of the "factors" on one of those charts.

wanderinwalker
September 13, 2007, 10:06 PM
ED21,

I'd just say the sights need a quick adjustment down and to the right. Then you'd be fine.

I agree with W.E.G.'s assessment of those targets. Round groups show consistency, and if you were having problem shown by one of those charts, it would be more erratic and oval-shaped.

Honestly, ALL of my adjustable sighted handguns had to be clicked to center when I first started firing them. If I had tried using just an analysis chart, I'd still be shooting them out the top and to the right, instead of mostly centered where they are now.

So basically, just adjust and move on, everything looks good.

Edited: You can change the horizontal impact by shifting how much finger you put on the trigger. According to the chart, you need to put your finger further over the trigger.

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