Coyotes Threaten Shoppers in AZ


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rc135
September 12, 2007, 02:55 PM
COYOTES THREATEN GROCERY SHOPPERS. Phoenix, AZ: Wary customers at North Valley grocery stores keep a watchful eye after several shoppers were recently threatened by three brazen coyotes. The animals were killed after they were trying to snatch white grocery bags from customers at a Fry's supermarket at Tatum Road and Cave Creek Road. "Coyotes are very smart animals," said Kriselle Colvin with Arizona Game & Fish. "Once they know where food source is, they know white bags have food in them, so they'll go up and grab them," Colvin said.

One of the biggest reasons for the problem is well-meaning people feeding them, Colvin said. In the Biltmore area a few years ago, a woman was buying rotisserie chickens from the store and leaving them out for the coyotes.

Elsewhere, coyotes have made themselves at home in Kathy St. Hilaire's North Valley neighborhood. "We see them walking up and down streets down subdivisions, in front of houses looking for food," she said. Wildlife officers said they field complaints every week about people feeding wildlife all across the Valley and it's usually because they think the animals are hungry. But if coyotes learn to expect food from people, it could make them dangerous to children and small pets, Colvin said. "I don't even know if there's such a thing as a starving coyote," Colvin said. "I mean, all these are very well fed and there are plenty of food sources. Golf courses have rabbits for them to eat." It's against the law in Arizona to feed any wildlife with the exception of birds and tree squirrels. Violators could fined $300. (Copyright 2007 by KPHO.com. All rights reserved).


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ArmedBear
September 12, 2007, 03:16 PM
In the Biltmore area a few years ago, a woman was buying rotisserie chickens from the store and leaving them out for the coyotes.


Behind every "wildlife problem" it seems there really is a problem with one or more human idiots.

Noxx
September 12, 2007, 03:40 PM
Behind every "wildlife problem" it seems there really is a problem with one or more human idiots

Amen to that. We have several screwballs at my company that are guilt of the same, feeding our ever-exploding population of stray cats.

El Tejon
September 12, 2007, 03:42 PM
We need to organize a gun drive for Arizona!:D

Eyesac
September 12, 2007, 03:45 PM
Coyotes are really smart. I've seen them stand in the middle of the highway, people will stop (to not run them over), and every couple cars throws some treat out the window.

Cougfan2
September 12, 2007, 03:45 PM
Amen to that. We have several screwballs at my company that are guilt of the same, feeding our ever-exploding population of stray cats.

From my experience, having a few Coyotes around would help solve the stray cat problem.:evil:

ArmedBear
September 12, 2007, 03:47 PM
They're dogs. They're not domesticated, of course, and likely can't be.

However, the behavior of your pet dog is a clue. Give your dog a treat in some situation, and he/she will be back for a treat next time the situation repeats. If you give your dog pieces of popcorn when you watch a DVD on one occasion, the dog WILL be sitting right there waiting, next time you pop in a movie.

Coyotes are no different. People are TRAINING them to wait for grocery shoppers. It's not rocket science.

Cougfan2
September 12, 2007, 04:06 PM
Coyotes are no different. People are TRAINING them to wait for grocery shoppers. It's not rocket science.

Armedbear and Pavlov are right! :D

Noxx
September 12, 2007, 04:08 PM
From my experience, having a few Coyotes around would help solve the stray cat problem

While I agree, I doubt coyotes would go over very well with our guests.

JesseL
September 12, 2007, 04:10 PM
I think that coyotes, much like pigeons or seagulls, are opportunists. Even if people aren't deliberately feeding them they'll make themselves a nuisance.

Unless you you make things actively hostile for them all the time, they're likely to try to get away with everything they can.

SSN Vet
September 12, 2007, 04:21 PM
a woman was buying rotisserie chickens from the store and leaving them out for the coyotes.

.......stupid is as stupid does.

How disconnected from nature can people get....and they do this thinking that it somehow connects them to nature.

My wife rented the DVD about whats-his-name (Mr. Bear Bait) the nut job who lived with and "protected" the Grizzley bears up in Kodiak, Alaska....the guy who was eaten alive (along with his girlfriend) by a bear.

The guy doing the documentary interviewed the native American curator of a wild life museum about Mr. Bear Bait and his response was very insightfull.

The curator said that from the Induit perspective, there is a distinct line between the domestic world and the wild world, and that Mr. Bear Bait disrespected the natural order (and the creator of that order) when he crossed the line to become "friends" with the wild bears.

I think feeding coyotes falls into the same catagory.

Pilgrim
September 12, 2007, 04:27 PM
Amen to that. We have several screwballs at my company that are guilt of the same, feeding our ever-exploding population of stray cats.
We had a similar problem at the Weapons Support Directorate, Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, CA. The director, a Navy captain, said he would fire anyone who left food out for the stray cats. The problem went away.

Pilgrim

ravencon
September 12, 2007, 04:37 PM
In Northampton, MA some maroon recently grabbed a young coyote that "looked sick" to take to the vet! Needless to say, said maroon was bit by the coyote. The authorities had to kill the coyote to ascertain whether it had rabies and the maroon was shocked, shocked at this unintended outcome. He was cited for moving a wild animal--a criminal offense here.

There was much angst in Northampton over this tragic outcome and last I heard the state was planning to relocate the surviving members of this orphaned family of coyotes.

This area is moon bat central.

BTW, the police just tranquilized a bear that wandered through downtown Amherst (which is a very busy college town). I'm guessing this bear was used to being fed by the usual suspects. This kind of thing has become quite common in this area.

kermit315
September 12, 2007, 04:40 PM
We had a similar problem at the Weapons Support Directorate, Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, CA. The director, a Navy captain, said he would fire anyone who left food out for the stray cats. The problem went away.


and i thank him. :D

ArmedBear
September 12, 2007, 04:46 PM
In the Biltmore area a few years ago, a woman was buying rotisserie chickens from the store and leaving them out for the coyotes.

What's doubly sick about this is that this woman can afford to buy these rotisserie chickens, and she feels the need to feed animals, but she feeds coyotes rather than going to the pound and adopting a few actual domesticated pet dogs that otherwise are killed by the pound.

If someone wants to have pets, there are pets to be had -- domesticated animals that will give love back to humans, and who need humans to survive.

Doggy Daddy
September 12, 2007, 05:09 PM
ArmedBear
... she feeds coyotes rather than going to the pound and adopting a few actual domesticated pet dogs that otherwise are killed by the pound.

If someone wants to have pets, there are pets to be had -- domesticated animals that will give love back to humans, and who need humans to survive.

Not one to do the "+1" thing, I felt the need to reinforce these sentiments.

Cougfan2
September 12, 2007, 05:34 PM
Not one to do the "+1" thing, I felt the need to reinforce these sentiments.

+2 I recently adopted a Choc Lab from a no kill shelter. Dog was turned loose by his A**bag owner because he had food alergies and he didn't want to deal with it.:cuss: Great dog!

Noxx
September 12, 2007, 05:37 PM
Both of my pups are adopted from shelters, and both of them are a light in our lives.

Our youngest was dumped at the park at 12 weeks of age, click the link in my sig to have a look at her and just wonder who would do such a thing.

Cougfan2
September 12, 2007, 05:45 PM
Noxx, great pics! Good lookin' pups!

LaEscopeta
September 12, 2007, 05:55 PM
...after several shoppers were recently threatened by three brazen coyotes.Three? I thought coyotes hunted alone or in mated pairs?
Also, coyotes weigh what, 40 to 60 lbs? How much of a threat are they to a healthily adult human? Can you throw rocks, shout, jab a pointed stick to drive them away, like you (usually) can to drive dogs away? I don't know I'm just asking.

Claude Clay
September 12, 2007, 05:58 PM
i've had many dogs....the latest 2 being a p'riacan rescue ( love me ) squirril catching mutt & a pure bread (sic) aussie shepard. Rescued the aussie at 1 yr of age from , a-hemm--numbnutz who pretty much ruined the animal. She has made my way into heaven cause I am sure nipper is of the devil spawned. And yup......she knows dvd's = treats.

LaE....as an aside, dog muscle is 3 or more times strenght of human per pound....racoon is 2x dog fdx gorrilis..................unknown

Noxx
September 12, 2007, 06:14 PM
Three? I thought coyotes hunted alone or in mated pairs?
Also, coyotes weigh what, 40 to 60 lbs? How much of a threat are they to a healthily adult human? Can you throw rocks, shout, jab a pointed stick to drive them away, like you (usually) can to drive dogs away? I don't know I'm just asking.

A crab-eating research monkey weighs 45lbs, and will tear your tuchus UP.

Can a coyote kill a healthy adult? Probably not, but when they've lost their fear of humans, they are certainly a threat.

Larry Ashcraft
September 12, 2007, 06:15 PM
I thought coyotes hunted alone or in mated pairs?
LaEscopeta, coyotes are smart enough to hunt in whatever numbers it takes. Around here, three seems common, especially if the coyotes are trying to fool domestic dogs.

Coyotes are smart enough to know they can't take on a large dog by themselves, so one or two will distract the dog so the others can come up from behind.

I watched three coyotes trying that with my two dogs about 175 yards away one morning. Fortunately, one of the coyotes came in contact with a small high speed object* that ended his career, and discouraged the other two. Barely missed one of the others on the run.

*.257 caliber, 100 grain Ballistic Tip @ 3300 fps. :)

JesseL
September 12, 2007, 06:17 PM
Three? I thought coyotes hunted alone or in mated pairs?

They form loose knit packs sometimes.

Also, coyotes weigh what, 40 to 60 lbs? How much of a threat are they to a healthily adult human?

Ask a 110lb woman.

Can you throw rocks, shout, jab a pointed stick to drive them away, like you (usually) can to drive dogs away?

Usually, yes. I don't expect that to continue being very reliable though. Coyote behavior is changing. 10 years ago it was unusual for a coyote to let you see him at all.

Joshua C
September 12, 2007, 06:26 PM
^kinda seems yet another justification of carry, doesn't it?

ArmedBear
September 12, 2007, 06:42 PM
Coyote behavior is changing.

http://www.alexross.com/80932-big.jpg

jlpskydive
September 12, 2007, 06:50 PM
hey Knoxx great pups!! Both of ours were rescues also and do the exact same thing. As for feeding wild animals all you are doing is signing their death warrants. To bad I hate to see an animal just wasted for no purpose. EXCEPT for those friggin squirrels that like to play on the roof promptly at 4 am every morning!!!!!!

Claude Clay
September 12, 2007, 06:55 PM
cut back ur trees & put skate board tape on limbs w/in 6 feet of jumping distance. g-d loves squirrles & than he made school boards...both are incredably annoying & almost impossible to divest one's self of. (sorry about that M T )

revjen45
September 12, 2007, 07:53 PM
"I think that coyotes, much like pigeons or seagulls, are opportunists."
True. At least they don't fly and drop #2. Any predator that has lost its fear of humans is extremely dangerous. There is nothing more dangerous than a pack of feral dogs. I recall an article about school children waiting for the school bus in rural Australia being menaced by dingoes. You know- the place that turned in their guns. Now their children are victuals for wild dogs.

ScottE
September 12, 2007, 10:39 PM
A couple weeks ago while at a local dog park (Cherry Creek State Park) in Denver, A guy told me about a lady who had her small dog killed by a coyote early in the morning. Her dog was on a leash at the time of attack. We have also had traps set out along some popular bike paths in town to catch coyotes that are threatening dogs.

McCall911
September 12, 2007, 10:44 PM
One of the biggest reasons for the problem is well-meaning people feeding them, Colvin said.

Just exactly what I was thinking before I even read the article!

People need to understand: Coyotes don't like you! If you like canids, get a dog.

havanatrader
September 13, 2007, 12:43 AM
I give my Great Dane a fresh coyote treat now and again...

Andrewsky
September 13, 2007, 12:51 AM
I used to live in AZ. A coyote sighting in the city is very rare. I saw 3 or 4 in the 4 years I was there. They're usually emaciated, and not a threat to anyone but small animals.

JesseL
September 13, 2007, 12:59 AM
I used to live in AZ. A coyote sighting in the city is very rare. I saw 3 or 4 in the 4 years I was there. They're usually emaciated, and not a threat to anyone but small animals.

True, that's the way it used to be.

These days, with all the urban expansion making what used to be uninviting desert into prime coyote oasis's, coyotes are learning that humans are convenient food suppliers and are rarely threatening.

daniel (australia)
September 13, 2007, 04:41 AM
There is nothing more dangerous than a pack of feral dogs. I recall an article about school children waiting for the school bus in rural Australia being menaced by dingoes. You know- the place that turned in their guns. Now their children are victuals for wild dogs.

We still have lots of guns - more now than before the buyback, despite the .gov.au - and the dingos don't seem to be making much of a dent in the supply of children:rolleyes:.

In all seriousness AFAIK the last time a child was taken by a dingo was some years ago, but that case is a good demonstration of how a problem can arise and be addressed. It took place at Fraser Island, just off the Queensland coast, which holds a remnant population of very pure bred dingos. It is a popular holiday spot, and for years people had been feeding dingos to bring them in for photos, leaving fish frames on the beach for them, leaving food out, strewing scraps about etc. As a result the dingos came to associate humans with food and also lost much of their shyness. There had been a couple of near misses but finally a boy was killed, and as a result a programwas put in place involving, among other things, providing secure food storage in campsites (and requiring people to use it), prohibiting feeding of dingos, prohibiting leaving of food scraps/fish frames etc, counselling visitors on the importance of not encouraging dingos etc. The rangers also shot a few dingos identified as a threat, and blokes were engaged to patrol with a slingshot to "sting" any dingos who were overly familiar, hanging around campsites etc, so as to instil a proper fear of humans in them.

It seems to be working - last time I was on Fraser the dingos were noticeably wary, and AFAIK there've been no more near misses let alone attacks.

Wild (feral) dogs are a bit of a separate issue, and a problem in some areas. These are often not far removed from domestic life and have little fear of people. Some are big too, derived from mixed breeding from working dogs, pig dogs and what have you. They breed up in National Parks (where shooting is not allowed) and emerge to attack livestock and (occasionally) menace people. Of course outside the National Parks they are fair game, but there's many farmers and others who'd prefer the National Parks administrators to play more of a part in controlling them.

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