10 things every Gunnie should be able to do.


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Blackfork
September 12, 2007, 11:08 PM
Interesting list in Popular Mechanics, but this is a GUN forum.

1. Safely handle any firearm.
2. Be able to field strip and clean common guns.
3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.
4. Have shot in competition.
5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm.
6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.
7. Reload ammuntion.
8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.
9. Competantly shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.
10. ?

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50 Shooter
September 12, 2007, 11:16 PM
Can't say that I agree with 4, 5, 7 & 9.

Some people can't or don't want to compete, others don't want or feel the need to hunt, some don't have the room or time to reload and some don't feel the need to be able to shoot using either/both hands.

Just my opinion but I'm sure others will feel the same, I've done all but #5. Hopefully some day I will be able to say that I've done #5, would like to take a pig with my .454.

Black Adder LXX
September 12, 2007, 11:17 PM
10 : Shoot skeet or trap??? I don't know but I sure want to try it one day...

Mosey
September 12, 2007, 11:18 PM
#10. Fire accurately from field positions.

#10(a). Keep mouth shut when the person at the firing position (or gun counter)next to you has a firearm that you don't like.

Ragnar Danneskjold
September 12, 2007, 11:18 PM
Was that list actually in Popular Mechanics?

I'm not sure I agree that hunting, reloading, or competing are absolute musts.

Bazooka Joe71
September 12, 2007, 11:18 PM
Haven't done #4 yet, and just started buying the supplies for #7.

I agree with 50 shooter, except for #9

rockstar.esq
September 12, 2007, 11:18 PM
#10 might address teaching / encouraging others to learn the first 9 by being a good role model!

redneckrepairs
September 12, 2007, 11:23 PM
10 is absolutly to be able to tell your buddys/wife/hubby what a good deal you got on the newest gun and just why you desperately needed it enough to put off the new tires/ trip to the carribian / kids braces , ect..

Jorg Nysgerrig
September 12, 2007, 11:24 PM
Was that list actually in Popular Mechanics?

Nope, the Popular Mechanics reference was in regards to this thread (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=302255).

The list seems to be what Blackfork thinks all gunnies should be able to do.

I'd personally strike at least 4, 5, & 9.

crebralfix
September 12, 2007, 11:28 PM
#9 is essential for self-defense, especially if you plan on moving while shooting.

Mot45acp
September 12, 2007, 11:28 PM
"#10. Fire accurately from field positions."

A big +1 That I am currently working on.

Samuraigg
September 12, 2007, 11:29 PM
1. Safely handle any firearm.

EVERYONE should know how to do this, not just Gunnies and gun owners.

2. Be able to field strip and clean common guns.

Agreed

3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.

Agreed

4. Have shot in competition.

Disagree with this. I have no interest in shooting competition. Does this make me less of a gunnie?

5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm.

Also Disagree. See number 4

6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.

Definitely. Got a lot of practice this past summer. ;)

7. Reload ammuntion.

Semi agree with this. Something I want to learn how to do and do regularly in the near future.

8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.

Sure

9. Competantly shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.

Rifle I don't know, but I could see learning how to shoot a pistol in your off hand as being very valuable. Imagine an emergency situation where your dominant hand was incapacitated.

2RCO
September 12, 2007, 11:30 PM
10.Not make all other Gunnies look bad by being a piece of work his or herself. Examples of what not to do: The gentleman who fired off the rounds in a Wally world parking lot, Mall Ninjas, CCWers that wear badges / brandish their weapon for no reason, those who have SHTF plans that involve weekly tactical Force on Force exercises with their closest parent's basement living, unmarried, un or underemployed friends.

Jorg Nysgerrig
September 12, 2007, 11:31 PM
#9 is essential for self-defense, especially if you plan on moving while shooting.

So, are you saying that you have to be trained in self-defense to be a gunnie? Just like it's not all about hunting, it's not all about defensive or combat skills either.

Nolo
September 12, 2007, 11:37 PM
Let me revise this list:
1. Obey the four rules of safety in ANY situation, with ANY firearm.
2. Understand the mechanics and physics of firearms.
3. Be able to handle, load, field-strip, clean (with and without proper tools), and store common firearms properly.
4. Use the proper ammunition in your firearms as well as recognize the difference between similar but different (common) calibers, such as .308 Winchester & 7.62 NATO, .223 Remington & 5.56 NATO, .38 Special & .357 Magnum, etc.
5. Know and be able to shoot competently in the three basic shooting positions: prone, kneeling and standing.
6. Know how to clear and prepare a shooting range (this may seem unimportant, but it is quite pertinent to knowing what is behind your target area, and it's also quite simple to learn).
7. Be able to understand range instructions at the range(s) you attend (yes, I know this will vary from range to range; there are several ranges that don't agree between the "red" and "green" range commands, hence why it is important to know what the commands mean at your range).
8. Be able to teach proper firearm rules and range safety to a new shooter, as well as be able to instruct a new shooter in proper shooting technique(s).
9. Understand with reasonable depth the laws governing firearms in your state/country.
10. Know the pressure limit for all your firearms (this is a must for handloaders and experimenters).

2TransAms
September 12, 2007, 11:52 PM
Gotta disagree with 4 and 5...especially 5. I have no problem with hunting,I just don't do it myself,nor do I need to. All my meat comes from farmers and other hunters. I know lots of hunters,I just never got into it. Bambi-killers:neener:.

I'll catch and fry the heck out of bluegill though.

Blackfork
September 13, 2007, 12:05 AM
...so I don't consider it carved in stone. Lots of good ideas coming along.

I am good with hunting, (at least once), competiton, (at least once), and reloading, at least once. I think they help round out a shooter. If you haven't competed, reloaded or had a successful hunt, I suggest it. They all certainly changed the way I think about shooting for the better.

I plan to take a deer with my AR and with my Bullseye .45 this year. (Both legal in Texas). I shot eight deer with seven different military rifles last year, and reloaded several of the rounds. Certainly is a different level of knowledge when you have done that. Last year I started competing with Garand, 1903, Carbine, Vintage military rifles and Bullseye pistol. I had to change the way I was doing some things to be successful. I couldn't have imagined that there WERE things to change unless I had been through that experience.

I remember reading Jim Criccios requirements for being on one of his NYCPD stakeout teams. He only took officers who had successfully hunted big game, shot in competiton, and reloaded their own ammo. He said they made the best stake out guys, period. This list isn't for stake outs of course but I was thinking of Jim when I rolled it out.

Maybe #10 should be: Be able to teach a novice how to use a firearm competently and safely.

Nolo
September 13, 2007, 12:08 AM
I think the teaching should be higher on the list.
But you already know what I think should be on the list. :evil:

scurtis_34471
September 13, 2007, 12:10 AM
I don't hunt or reload, but I can say yes to the rest of it. I'm not a great shot with my left hand only, but IDPA has forced me to practice and improve.

MechAg94
September 13, 2007, 12:23 AM
When I think of shooting with the off hand for pistols, I believe it means you can pick up a gun with your off hand and hit a target at say 3 yards or even 7 yards. Not a great deal of distance or accuracy, just enough for self defense.

I can do this or at least I have shot with either hand at the range. I am left handed, but have always shot right handed. My accuracy doesn't drop off much shooting left handed, it is just unfamiliar.

CNYCacher
September 13, 2007, 12:40 AM
Have at least 5 pairs of eyes and a few sets of muffs with a backup box of foam plugs in your range bag
Know the 4 rules. Know how to present them to others
Own guns that are easy for new shooters to understand/shoot, and also that are lots of fun to shoot.
Be a member of a private range that allows guests
Be willing to take a new shooter to the range at any time
At all times, present yourself as a responsible adult, especially to those who know that you have guns.
Know as much as possible about gun laws, myths, issues and debate points, WITH facts to back it up. Be prepared for any spontaneous debate.
Know how to handle "So. . . I was thinking about getting a gun. . ." from a friend out of the blue.
Have an empty AK mag that spontaneously needs reloading when you have visitors over. (works well for the previous 2 :D)
Have a relationship with a local shop. Know how to help a friend pick out their first gun without looking like a straw purchase.


Each one teach one (or more).

My tally:
First-time shooters: 15
Anti's converted: 1
Fence sitters pulled over: 7
New gun owners: 4

cpttango30
September 13, 2007, 12:41 AM
What is a common firearm? A common firearm to me might not be to you?

I drunk blind monkey can field strip a M-16 just as fast as forest gump.

But what about tearing down a 1917 Rem Enfield? I have 1 and my dad has 4 of them. He also has a few others that might not be common place in your house but they sure were in our. Like a 243 target rifle with a Unertal scope and a 1.5" bull barrel.

I could not field strip a glock because I do not own one nor do I plan on owning one any time soon. I will stick with my tested and proven 1911. So why do I need to know how to field strip it?

I do know how to field strip a m-60 m249 m240 m-2 mk19mod4 does that count?

#10 I think you should know your limits. Not everyone can shoot a 700 Nitro Express.

#11 Do not talk smack to a long time gun owner/gun nut. I had a guy tell me his POS dasiy pellet gun could shoot .25" groups at 100 yards with his nifty scope on it. A plastic scope non the less. I think it was a 3x15mm if it was that big. I could barly see threw the darn thing.

#12 Do not give a first time shooter the biggest damn gun you bring. :cuss: I have seen this ruin too many shooters for ever by either scaring them off or making them flinch real bad.

#13 No one knows everything about guns. So do not try to act like you do.

#14 Never brag about how many or how big your guns are.

Edit: CNY them there are some of the best points on this thread.

Mat, not doormat
September 13, 2007, 12:44 AM
A lot of the list falls under the "duh, that's part of the definition of the word gunny," heading. However, I particularly agree with 4, 5, 7, & 9.

Competition shooting is about much more than winning ribbons, or whatever. There are enough gun games around that anyone should be able to find one to fit their interests. I always thought that I was a pretty good shot, quick and accurate. Then I started shooting SASS. Boy, was I ever in for a shock. I've improved about a thousandfold since then. It takes your skills to a whole new level.

Hunting is a similar thing. It actually has very little to do with firearms, as even a mediocre shot can generally plug a whitetail, but more with increasing one's awareness of the world around you.

Reloading is a double thing. On the one hand, it takes you leaps and bounds beyond what you knew as mere theory, and puts it into practice. Second, Even shooting the cheapest centerfire stuff around, it's extremely expensive to shoot enough to get really good at it. It sort of forms part of the dividing line between dilletante shooters and serious shooters.

As for firing with either hand, why ever would you not learn a rather basic skill like that? You've got two hands now, presumably, but that might not always be the case. It's a lot harder to learn how to type with ten fingers than it is to teach five more fingers how to shoot, at a basic level.

Of course the entire discussion reminds me of my favorite Heinlein quote:

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.


~~~Mat

jfh
September 13, 2007, 12:44 AM
Let's agree that lists for shooters and lists for gunnies will be somewhat different.

I consider myself a gunny, not a shooter. Anyone want to take a pass at defining those terms before we go further?

Jim H.

Geronimo45
September 13, 2007, 01:01 AM
As per 4,5,7, and 9.
No problems with 9... though I don't see that there'd be too much need to shoot with your 'wrong' hand with a rifle. A handgun, I can see.

As for 4 - closely connected to 7, IMO. You need lots of ammunition to shoot in competitions... and ammunition costs a lot of money, and reloading equipment will pay off in the long run. Since I be a poor, pitiful college student, I'm not in reloading or competition shooting. Looking to get into reloading on a basic scale - for shooting wax bullets.

As for 5: I just don't see much use in hunting, at this time, for myself. I could go out, buy a hunting-caliber bolt rifle, get the hunting license, and pull whatever shenanigans are required to get a hunting ground - but I don't see much practical use. Seems like it could get awfully expensive awfully fast... and you might not see a darned thing (I have a talent for such things. Three people go fishing. All use identical corks, hooks, sinkers, fishing line, fishing bait. Results? Two out of three catch fish repeatedly. One out of three catches nothing).

Wheeler44
September 13, 2007, 01:01 AM
Nolo; you show uncommon good sense for a sixteen year old. If you ever plan to come to the Pacific North West tell me and we'll go shootin'.

Wheeler44

Beetle Bailey
September 13, 2007, 02:19 AM
Well, muzzleloaders are a mystery to me and I haven't yet learned to handload ammo.

As for learning to shoot a longgun with your off-hand, I always thought it was pointless since if I have both hands available, I figured I would always use my strong hand. However, I talked to a varmint hunter about this, and he set me straight.

Sometimes when you are in the field, the terrain can be unfavorable and the best place to set up your rifle may not allow you to lay down and use your strong hand. In that case, being able to use your weak-hand allows you to get a shot you otherwise wouldn't have. BTW, he isn't quite as limber as he once was, so that plays a factor as well. Also, he doesn't like thumbhole stocks because they do not allow ambidexterous shooting.

Dr. Peter Venkman
September 13, 2007, 02:53 AM
Disagree with those already mentioned but on top of number two. Not my gun, not my problem to break it down and clean it. Making sure it is safe is necessary, but I don't believe knowing how to field strip 'common guns' (if there is such a term) is necessary.

Hunter0924
September 13, 2007, 03:01 AM
I will agree with the list. Even though some do not. Example shooting one IDPA match makes you understand even a little about move and cover. Reloading is another skill worth understanding.

Sir Aardvark
September 13, 2007, 03:19 AM
I dont like #4 and #5.

I don't have anything to prove by competing with others; I am generally better than anyone else I shoot with, whether it be Skeet or Target Shooting with all of my firearms - practice pays off!.
I would substitute here that one should take a defense class that utilizes and emphasizes firearms, or a CCW class that involves at least 8 hours of actual shooting - this will give someone basic skills involving successful techniques and tactics in the defensive use of a firearm.

Also, I don't hunt because I really have no need or desire to acquire a trophy or eat game. Maybe this will change... ???.

Add as #10: Must possess the ability to properly and correctly train another in the safe use of firearms (and related skills) to the degree that they would also be considered competent in all skills on this list.

MaterDei
September 13, 2007, 03:34 AM
10. To know, understand, and be able to defend, in a civil debate, the second amendment of the US Constitution.

busy_squirrel
September 13, 2007, 04:05 AM
I have no reason for #4 and no time for #7.:neener:

trickyasafox
September 13, 2007, 04:21 AM
i like the idea, but i'd pass on the hunting as others noted. I love hunting, but like guns, its not for everyone.

for number ten how bout "explain why firearms are good tools, and aren't inherently evil"

ryan in maine
September 13, 2007, 04:38 AM
1. Safely handle any firearm.

Well, I don't know about any firearm, but I get what you're saying. I can agree with that.


2. Be able to field strip and clean common guns.

I can agree with this.


3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.

I can agree with this. Although maybe you should change your #1 to any "common" firearm.


4. Have shot in competition.

I think you just need to rephrase some things. Your title says "should be able to do", but you're phrasing things in the sense that you should have done them, or have to do them, in order to be considered a gunny.

I'd rephrase this to "be able to shoot competitively" but even then, some folks aren't looking to hone their craft beyond the point of pure self-defense.


5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm.

I'd also rephrase this one to "should know how to hunt and kill a game animal" period. Firearm or spear.


6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.

Ha ha. The ace up our sleeves.


7. Reload ammuntion.

Not sure if I can agree with this one or not. It's obviously a skill with no drawbacks that I can think of, but I don't know if it would make my top 10 list (then again, I don't know what my top 10 list would be).


8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.

I can agree with this. I haven't learned how yet, personally.


9. Competantly shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.

I can agree with this. You ought to be able to shoot accurately with your off/weak hand. If you're right-handed and you get shot in your right wrist/arm, well then...


10. ?

I can also agree with leaving a blank on the list. Because who the heck knows what the next poster will think is vital to their gunny-ship. They might think matching your firearm to your wardrobe is a top 10 gunny skill. Ha ha.

ConfuseUs
September 13, 2007, 06:22 AM
1. Safely handle any firearm.
Everyone should learn how to do that in 6th grade. Alas, the public educators think otherwise.

2. Be able to field strip and clean common guns.
THere are a heck of a lot of common guns. I would reduce that to be able to field strip/reassemble and clean YOUR guns without referring to the manual. Bonus points for doing it in the dark.

3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.
A fair expectation of any gunnie

4. Have shot in competition.
Some gunnies are collectors and shoot only for fun. Others may not be interested in competition.

5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm.
Many gun owners don't hunt and don't feel the need to.

6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.
Can't own 'em if you don't buy 'em and don't inherit any(assuming you aren't a thief).

7. Reload ammuntion.
Many gunnies don't, for a variety of reasons.

8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.
Yep. Gotta know how to do that to consider oneself a gunnie.

9. Competantly shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.
Err, no. If you use guns for self defense it's a very good skill. Other shooters don't need to.

10. Calmly and reasonably articulate your position on guns without ranting and raving, resorting to name calling, or lying through your teeth. Although I am pro-gun, when I bought a rifle in a pawn shop a few months ago I got to listen to a foaming at the mouth rant let loose by the salesguy while my background check went through. Even though I agreed with him I still wanted to tell him to shut the **** up.

daniel (australia)
September 13, 2007, 06:24 AM
I quite like the list - perhaps because it meets my view of what a competent experienced bloke should have ticked off.

1. Safely handle any firearm.
That should be a given, a standard achieved early.

2. Be able to field strip and clean common guns.
Certainly you should be able to tear down and clean your own, and have a fair idea of how to help out a less-experienced mate. I guess also that with the passage of time and acquisition of experience the list of fireams you've handled, pulled apart and cleaned grows.

3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.
As for 2, but with the additional proviso that you should be able to clear any firearm handed to you - or not be backward in asking how.

4. Have shot in competition.
You mightn't get off on it, but until you've experienced it you have no real basis for an opinion - it would be a big gap in knowledge and experience. Besides, it can be a good way of learning, practicing, improving your skills in a measurable way and learning to cope with pressure, any or all of which can be useful in other contexts. As others have said there's so many varieties of competition that you could find one to suit pretty much any area of interest or focus on any skill set. I personally have little interest in competition for its own sake, but I've shot in competition with rifle, shotgun and pistol in quite a range of disciplines, and it has all been valuable.

5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm.
Again like 4., until you've experienced it you have little basis for an opinion, and a big knowledge gap. IMHO it is a thing that a person ought to be able to do for themself, even if by and large you were content to let others kill your food for you. Reading that back it sounds a bit dogmatic, and that isn't my intention, but if you were to say to me "oh I've never hunted" that would be a major area of my experience of shooting that we wouldn't share.

6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.
Hehe - in Australia! :neener:

7. Reload ammunition.
Knowing how it works, and how to put together accurate, reliable, effective loads is another area of knowledge a bloke should have - even if you choose not to do it as a regular thing.

8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.
Should go without saying. Unfortunately this is one competency which is not universal.

9. Competently shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.
A very useful skill, both in defensive applications (as well as IDPA and IPSC) and on occasion while hunting: an awkward position where obstacles give you no other choice, or an injury to the strong hand or eye (or spectacles). Shotguns too, probably hardest of all, for additional kudos. Shooting ambidextrously also impresses the hell out of your mates;)

10. Here I would say teaching the skills and knowledge to others. A "gunny" should be able to do that, perhaps most important of all.:)

Hkmp5sd
September 13, 2007, 06:37 AM
How about a couple of more:

xx) Participate and/or be active in pro-gun rights activity of your choice.


xx) Know the difference between a magazine and a clip.

squinty
September 13, 2007, 07:09 AM
Well, my interest in firearms is primarily as self defense tools. I don't particularly relish the thought of killing game animals - I've no problem whatever with those who do, and I concede it's a useful skill - just doesn't trip my trigger. Does that mean I'm not an official "gunny?" :(

Fast Frank
September 13, 2007, 07:34 AM
I think some of you are missing the point.

The point of this list is to show the line between your average Nimrod and the dedicated folks that have lots of experience and truly know what they are doing.

A similar statement could be made about drivers and the ability to back a boat trailer into a narrow garage.

The guy that says "I have been driving for a gazillion years and never had to back a boat into a garage" is making a similar objection. He's saying "I think I'm a good driver, even though I lack the skills you mentioned".

But you can bet your bottom dollar that AJ Foyt, Richard Petty, Al Unser, and any of the other great drivers that anybody can name would have the skill to do this job because having skills is what separates the rock stars from the groupies.

Do I personally posses all the skills and experience mentioned in the first list?

Doesn't matter, because I'm not in the habit of calling myself a Gunny.

Do I agree with the skills and experiences listed?

Well, I would tend to agree that a person that truly possesses the skills and experience level dictated by that list has most likely dedicated a pretty large part of his life to shooting (For whatever reason), and that's what we mean when we say "Gunnie", isn't it?

Lone_Gunman
September 13, 2007, 08:11 AM
One very important thing that has been left off:

Join the NRA!!!

JohnBT
September 13, 2007, 08:34 AM
"5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm."

I think this one should be expanded to include cleaning the game and cooking it.

John
_____

P.S. - "Two out of three catch fish repeatedly. One out of three catches nothing"

I sometimes fish for herring when they run in the spring. Yum, herring roe fried in bacon grease. Yum, salt herring for breakfast. Anyway, my buddy the lawyer has always been extremely good at enticing the fish to bite the bare gold hooks that're used to catch herring. So one day we're standing shoulder to shoulder with 100 strangers at a lock on the Chickahominy River and the lawyer was filling a bucket with fish faster than anyone else. The guy next to him hadn't caught a fish in 30 minutes. The lawyer turned to him and asked, "So, what are you fishing for?"

Nevermind. You had to be there.

scout26
September 13, 2007, 09:23 AM
When I saw this thread the first thing I thought of was Heinlein's quote.


1. Safely handle any firearm.
Know and be ab le to articulate/demonstrate and faithfully practice the Four Rules

2. Safely Load, Clear, Disassemble and Clean Your Firearms.
That implies reading the owners manual for each and every firearm you own. However, I also have the expectation to be able to safely clear any firearm.

3. Be able to load and clear any common firearm.
A fair expectation of any gunnie

4. Get Some Training.
Whether that have been in military basic training, an NRA Class, CMP or Appleseed clinic, IDPA, IPSC, SASS, or even just a very experienced mentor. .

5. Hunted and killed a game animal with a firearm or Least Attend a Hunter Safety Education Course.
More then just hunting skills are taught in these classes. Safety, Ethics, Conservation, History, just to name a few. Many gun owners don't hunt and don't feel the need to, but we need to "cross pollinate" to create understanding between the various gunnie "factions".

6. Successfully navigate the purchase of a firearm.
And also be familiar with the the laws of your state/county/city, etc.

7. Reload ammuntion.
A very useful skill. Doesn't mean you have to make a hobby, but provides excellent lessons in ballistics, accuracy and safety.

8. Be able to zero iron and scope sights.
Again basic skills, you can't hit your target if you can't get your sights on target.

9. Competantly shoot a pistol or rifle with either hand.
Again another skill that may save your life or enable you to make that shot you would not have otherwise been able to take.

10. Calmly and reasonably articulate your position on guns and be active in defending our rights.

Mr White
September 13, 2007, 10:29 AM
10. Flame another member of an Internet gun forum because they either expressed a liking for a gun or caliber you hate or a hatred for a gun or caliber you like.

:D

vtoddball
September 13, 2007, 10:39 AM
I think it's a good list.

If you want to consider yourself proficient with a firearm and all it's uses you should have some experience in all the different aspects. I'm not excited by the prospect of hunting but I've done it because the experience teaches one things that a book can not. And not just about hunting, but how your gun will behave under certain conditions. The same thing goes for the competition shooting. It's such a large part of the firearms world that paying no attention to it whatsoever leaves a large gap in your knowledge of the shooting sports.

I think of a gunny as someone who could answer questions regarding any aspect of shooting whether it be hunting, reloading, competition rules, history, safety, smithing, markmanship, etc. I'm not saying that it's wrong not to know all these things, but I personally wouldn't consider you a gunny if you didn't. Just like I wouldn't consider a chef all that great if he could only make one kind of cuisine really well.

I also don't think the list implies you have to love and consistently participate in all the listed activities, just try them once or twice.

ZeSpectre
September 13, 2007, 10:49 AM
One that should be in there...

Act as a diplomat for firearms owners everywhere

boredelmo
September 13, 2007, 11:03 AM
Know all federal and local firearms related laws?

ZeSpectre
September 13, 2007, 11:16 AM
Know all federal and local firearms related laws?
Now THERE is an impossible task <sigh>.

General Geoff
September 13, 2007, 12:17 PM
Agreed. Law enforcement can't even keep track of them all, and they have access to databases. We go off memory 95% of the time...

Stump Water
September 13, 2007, 12:58 PM
... because I'm not in the habit of calling myself a Gunny.

Neither am I. I don't like the term. Not in the context that it's used here.

I've been shooting, hunting, reloading, etc. for 25 years and I'd never heard or seen the term "gunny" or "gunnie" until coming to these fora... except as an abbreviation for an USMC Gunnery Sergeant.

Stump Water
September 13, 2007, 01:01 PM
... because I'm not in the habit of calling myself a Gunny.

Neither am I. I don't like the term. Not in the context that it's used here.

I've been shooting, hunting, reloading, etc. for 25 years and I'd never heard or seen the term "gunny" or "gunnie" until coming to these fora... except as an abbreviation for an USMC Gunnery Sergeant.

Joe Gunns
September 13, 2007, 05:11 PM
No one should seriously aspire to being a gun writer unless he/she meets all the standards of the original list and all of the amended and alternative lists! ;-)

Seems 2 me that if you are a well-rounded shooter you should be able to meet each of the original criteria. If you don't, and it bothers you, then rectify the lack.

RE: Hunting. I think that hunting rounds out a shooter by giving them "real world" experience with the effect of a given ammo on living beings, the performance of a given firearm under field conditions, and controlling/compensating for the reactions of their own physiology under stress and unusual physical exertion. Likewise competition gives the shooter experience in dealing with nerves and stress. And training is essential in developing reliable firearm's skills and judgement. Together, competition, training and hunting support each other by providing complementary experiences that promote the development of a more complex mental "map" to draw on in self defensive situations. James

thegriz
September 13, 2007, 05:23 PM
> Should be proficient in butt-stroking and pistol whipping:evil:

> Should be proficient in using a glock to dig foxholes, cut firewood, and pound fence posts while being able to instantly reload and engage bad guys (all with your off hand):neener:

Stevie-Ray
September 13, 2007, 07:42 PM
Hunting, reloading, and competition should certainly not be considered requirements. And though I reload and have competed, I will probably never hunt.


Should be proficient in using a glock to dig foxholes, cut firewood, and pound fence posts while being able to instantly reload and engage bad guys (all with your off hand)Why not? It'll certainly fire without problem after doing all of the above.:neener:

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