Lockheed shooting


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Justin
July 8, 2003, 01:23 PM
Fox News story (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91334,00.html)

Lauderdale County authorities said a gunman opened fire at a Lockheed Martin plant outside Meridian, hitting several people.

A local television station reported that seven people, including the gunman, were dead, citing a Mississippi Highway Patrol spokesman.

Lauderdale County Sheriff Billy Sollie told reporters that the gunman had killed five before he himself died.

A local reporter told Fox News that at least eight people had been injured.

Meridian Mayor John Robert Smith confirmed to Fox News that there had been "multiple deaths, multiple injuries," and that the shooter was "no longer a threat," but that he had no further information.

A sheriff's dispatcher said she could not confirm reports of deaths.

"All we can say at this point is that there was a shooting out at Lockheed and several people were injured," the dispatcher said. "The sheriff is on the scene."

A local radio reporter told Fox News that the gunman, whom he described as a current employee, was armed with a shotgun and semiautomatic weapon.

Officials at the plant declined comment.

Rest of the story:
Fox News story (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91334,00.html)

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MessedUpMike
July 8, 2003, 01:24 PM
Here we go again kids:banghead:

Some disgruntled employee just went and shot 13 people in the lockheed facility in Mississippi six dead including the gunman, 8 others wounded.

now word on weapons yet.

J Miller
July 8, 2003, 01:32 PM
The weapons are really irrelevant to the act. More relevant is what caused the person to cary this much stress and anger so long that he exploded in a murderous rage.

Justin
July 8, 2003, 01:34 PM
Oh yeah, and guess what is strictly prohibited by Lockheed Martin company policy.

Justin
July 8, 2003, 01:39 PM
Duplicate threads merged.

12GA
July 8, 2003, 01:39 PM
Six Killed at Mississippi Defense Plant (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91334,00.html)

Report: Six Killed at Mississippi Aircraft Plant

Tuesday, July 08, 2003

MERIDIAN, Miss. — As many as six people were killed in a workplace shooting in Mississippi Tuesday.

Lauderdale County authorities said a gunman opened fire at a Lockheed Martin plant outside Meridian, hitting several people.

Sheriff Billy Sollie told reporters that the gunman had killed five before he himself died.

"He went through the entire plant, shooting individuals through the facility. There was no one small area," Sollie said.

A local reporter told Fox News that at least eight people had been injured.

Meridian Mayor John Robert Smith confirmed to Fox News that there had been "multiple deaths, multiple injuries," and that the shooter was "no longer a threat," but that he had no further information.

A sheriff's dispatcher said she could not confirm reports of deaths.

"All we can say at this point is that there was a shooting out at Lockheed and several people were injured," the dispatcher said. "The sheriff is on the scene."

A local radio reporter told Fox News that the gunman, whom he described as a current employee, was armed with a shotgun and semiautomatic weapon.

Officials at the plant declined to comment and a Lockheed Martin national spokeswoman was unavailable to immediately provide details.

"We're just trying to gather information and are working with state and local authorities to determine the details of the incident," said spokeswoman Meaghan Mariman from the company's Bethesda, Md., headquarters.

The plant builds structural subassemblies for the C-130J Hercules transport plane and the F-22 Raptor fighter-bomber.

Lockheed Martin is the largest defense contractor in the United States. The corporation had sales of $24 billion in 2001. It employs about 125,000 people.

Subsidiary Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. is based in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

cordex
July 8, 2003, 01:42 PM
Michael Moore will love this.
"What caused this man to go on a rampage? Was it the media? Was it the gun? Was it the fact that he worked in a plant that created killdeath weapons for the evil military industrial complex?"

OF
July 8, 2003, 01:46 PM
Oh yeah, and guess what is strictly prohibited by Lockheed Martin company policy.:cuss: Bastards!

What are the chances that one of the dead, or wounded or even one of the employees in a position to stop it would have been carrying if they could. I don't think Lockheed has too many blissninnys on the payroll, so I'd bet the chances would have been high.

:fire:

- Gabe

Sheslinger
July 8, 2003, 02:25 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91334,00.html

I have no idea what the motive was but I often wonder how many of these cases it would take before corporations cease exploitation of employees. You can only push people so far.

I in no way condone what this person did but I have experienced workplace rage and it is not pretty...

Sheslinger

braindead0
July 8, 2003, 02:28 PM
I normally hate to say "Sue them" but if I were a CCW license holder employed there.. I'd probably talk to a lawyer...

Granted, you can always refuse to work at a place the doesn't let you carry, but sadly I think there aren't many of those.

Ala Dan
July 8, 2003, 02:46 PM
So sad folk's. What on earth has this (civilized, I think?)
society come too? Stress is every where; at home, in
the work place, at play, even on the Internet I suppose.
We all are suppose to be big boy's and girl's; therefore
we need to learn to cope with the matters at hand.

Some folk's walking around are ticking time bomb's,
with NO RESPECT for other human being's; too many
mental disoriented folks, roper doper's, sex offender's,
drug dealers and the like walking the streets these
days!:uhoh: They need to be locked-up, and the key
thrown in the ocean.

HomeLand security should start at Home!

When the tide turns against me, I dial 10-10-P220!

Best Wishes,
Ala Dan, N.R.A. Life Member

bogie
July 8, 2003, 02:46 PM
Well, I am _very_ worried, since my company got bought by another larger one, and is getting pruned... More than a few of the folks I work with are rather tightly wrapped, don't become emotional, don't let anything blow off, until they get _really_ torqued... And things are tightening all over... I'm worried that one of these people is gonna snap... I'm 40 seconds from an exit.

Carlos Cabeza
July 8, 2003, 03:12 PM
What makes people crack like this ? This is a key anti argument, that someone "might" go off and shoot people, therefore ALL guns should be under tight regulation. Does stress really compel some people to kill others at random ? Or does the lack of coping skills allow pressure to build up, looking for an opportunity to release ? I have always thought that adversity creates a mentally stronger person. The saying goes "That which does not kill me only makes me stronger" Aside from my reasoning and trying to make sense of this heinous act, my heart and soul goes out to those affected by the terrible and senseless action of one disturbed man.

HBK
July 8, 2003, 03:31 PM
Someone at the factory should have been armed and in a position to stop it. If guns are not allowed, only the bad people who have no respect for the rules will have them.

mephisto
July 8, 2003, 03:55 PM
one guy with a mak could have stoped that whole mess. But why stop the bad guy when easy to stop the good guy.

Skunkabilly
July 8, 2003, 04:22 PM
Not that it's relevant for anything other than political exploitation, any mention on the type of rifle and shotgun?

Why couldn't the :cuss: just kill himself first and set the cleanup crew sort it out??? :fire:

12GA
July 8, 2003, 04:23 PM
Employee Slays Five Before Killing Self (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,91334,00.html)

Employee Slays Five Before Killing Self at Mississippi Aircraft Plant

Tuesday, July 08, 2003



MERIDIAN, Miss. — An employee armed with a shotgun and rifle opened fire at a Lockheed Martin (search) plant Tuesday, killing five people before shooting himself dead.

Eight others, some in critical condition, were taken to hospitals, according to Lauderdale County (search) Sheriff Billy Sollie. The attack in this city of 40,000 near the Alabama line was the nation's deadliest workplace killing spree in two years.

"He had a shotgun and a semiautomatic rifle and he appeared to open fire at random on employees," Sollie said.

Authorities identified the gunman as Doug Williams, who was an assembler at the plant. Booker Steverson, another Lockheed Martin employee, said many knew Williams as a "racist" who didn't like blacks. Williams was white.

"When I first heard about it, he was the first thing that came to my mind," said Jim Payton, who is retired from the plant, but had worked with Williams for about a year.

He said Williams had mentioned a desire to kill people.

"He said, 'I'm capable of doing it,"' Payton said.

The first shots rang out at around 9:30 a.m.

"At first I thought it was something falling on the ground. Then I walked to the aisle and saw him aiming his gun. I took off. Everybody took off," said Steverson, who was building an airplane when he heard the gunfire break out.

Sollie said no other individuals were involved and his officers were securing the scene. Investigators had no motive, he said.

The sheriff's department did not immediately confirm the name of the shooter. Sollie said the attacker was a Lockheed Martin employee, but did not know whether the man had been in trouble with his bosses.

"We are not sure if those killed were friend or foe," the sheriff said. "There was no indication it involved race or gender as far as his targets were concerned."

About two dozen people waited near a busy road outside the plant at midday. Law enforcement agents made vehicles go through checkpoints.

John Willis said he drove to the plant when he heard his brother, assembler Thomas Willis, had been shot.

"They've just had us standing out here," John Willis said solemnly, struggling to find words as he awaited word on his brother's condition.

A worker who didn't want to be identified or speak to reporters was offered a cold drink by friends. His hand shook violently as he drank from the plastic foam cup.

It was the nation's deadliest workplace shooting since a software tester in Wakefield, Mass., killed seven people the day after Christmas in 2000.

Officials at the plant declined to comment and a Lockheed Martin national spokeswoman was unable to immediately provide details.

"We're just trying to gather information and are working with state and local authorities to determine the details of the incident," said spokeswoman Meaghan Mariman from the company's Bethesda, Md., headquarters. She says the plant employs roughly 150 people.

Gov. Ronnie Musgrove said: "Mississippi's family grieves today for this senseless tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of those lost."

Meridian, a city of about 40,000 near the Alabama line, has an economy that depends largely on the military. Besides the Lockheed Martin plant, the area is home to a naval air station and a training facility for the Air National Guard (search).

The Meridian plant builds parts for the C-130J Hercules (search) and vertical stabilizers for F-22 Raptor (search) jets, which are assembled at the plant in Marietta, Ga., along with military transport planes.

Lockheed Martin is the largest defense contractor in the United States. The corporation had sales of $24 billion in 2001. It employs about 125,000 people.

Subsidiary Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. is based in Fort Worth, Texas.

Mark Tyson
July 8, 2003, 04:35 PM
It doesn't take a gun to commit an atrocity like this. There have been cases of arson where dozens of people have died in minutes. You can't just take people's rights away because of the actions of a few evil miscreants. I don't go pushing prohibition every time I see a DD accident involving multiple deaths.

El Tejon
July 8, 2003, 05:14 PM
The BBC just reported that the murderer's co-workers expressed concern for his mental stability and informed their manager of his behavior and that they feared this sort of attack.

It is a sad day that people fear being fired for possessing the means of self-defense over being murdered. I hope the mommies and Sarah Brady are happy that no one fought back because "they might have been hurt."

They stood there and allowed themselves to be slaughtered just like the media, government schools and the police told them to. Disgusting.

Sportcat
July 8, 2003, 05:20 PM
Unfortunate, but well put El Tejon. :rolleyes:

Shaggy
July 8, 2003, 05:31 PM
have no idea what the motive was but I often wonder how many of these cases it would take before corporations cease exploitation of employees. You can only push people so far.

Oh brother.....I would normally just find another job. I don't go storming in killing the co-workers who have little to nothing to do with my "stress"

This is just a product of the "ME" society that has been created the last fifty years. A product of the nanny state in which people believe they are owed a living, a retirement at 60, free health care, free prescription drugs, job security until they are ready to retire....And the prospect of not having some or all of those things....they explode. And they have a mindset of taking as many as they can with them.

CCW should be the law of the land across this nation and their should be no restrictions. Maybe check your gun at the courthouse into a locker, but everybody there passes through metal detector on entrance. The solution to these mass murders is simple really. Leave it to the sane to pop the crazies.

Waitone
July 8, 2003, 05:43 PM
Alright, let's run through the questions

1>how many reports did management have of this guy state of mind?

2>How many co-workers had conversations with the guy where he discussed "getting even."

3>What is Lockheed's personnel policy on legally licensed employees carrying handguns on company property?

4>How many of those shot and either wounded or killed were legally licensed to carry concealed handguns?

5>How many people in the vicinity of those wounded or killed were legally licensed to carry concealed hanguns?

In my not so humble opinion if an employer can be prosecuted for not providing a safe workplace, self-same employer can be held accountable for personnel policies which prohibit workers from effectively defending themselves. One good galactic scale lawsuit will cut this crap completely out. Lockheed is not a defense contractor, it is a slaughterhouse.

Bobarino
July 8, 2003, 06:35 PM
extremely sad incident. the only good thing to come of it is the BG killed himself. at least we don't have to pay for trails and jails. my sympathies for the victims and their families.

Bobby

BamBam
July 8, 2003, 08:38 PM
Booker Steverson, another Lockheed Martin employee, said many knew Williams as a "racist" who didn't like blacks. Williams was white.
Investigators had no motive, he said.

"We are not sure if those killed were friend or foe," the sheriff said. "There was no indication it involved race or gender as far as his targets were concerned."

Gotta throw in the "Racist" thing.
My local TV news described Williams as an "angry white male".
-Angry
-White
-Male
All danger signs!

Standing Wolf
July 8, 2003, 09:33 PM
He had a shotgun and a semiautomatic rifle...

See? That proves we have to take all hand guns away from the commoners.

cool45auto
July 8, 2003, 09:39 PM
He said Williams had mentioned a desire to kill people.
He said, 'I'm capable of doing it,"' Payton said.

:eek: Looks like the signs were there.

Bainx
July 8, 2003, 09:51 PM
Aside, Lockheed Martin was one of the best employers I ever worked for.
They took a real interest in the well-being and safety of the workers.
Unfortunately, their brand of "safety" does not include the worker being able to defend his life.

BamBam...the news medias instant use of "angry white male".........it's enough to make you want to vomit isn't it!

RAY WOODROW 3RD
July 8, 2003, 09:59 PM
I work for Lockheed in NJ. No guns/knives/etc. allowed on the premises.
Security Guards? No guns allowed on their person.
Security can carry NOTHING to defend us and Lockheed will not allow us to do it for ourselves.
All Security can do is say, " Halt!" and write up an incident report while calling the police.
Lockheed is a GREAT place to work and at least the NJ plant is full of progunners. I should know. I am just waiting for the other shoe to drop where management starts to ask the workers, "If you know somweone who shoots or owns firearms please report their names to human resources person XXXXXXXXX."

That is just how the game is played my friends. They and all the other companies we work for never will get a clue. To much of a liability I guess.

To the families that lost someone or had someone injured, my prayers are with you. Blame the man. Not the tool.

aerod1
July 8, 2003, 10:45 PM
I pray for the families who lost loved ones. It is truely a tragic act of a murderous, derainged individual.
I heard the guns were a shotgun and a 223 caliber semi-automatic rifle.
May God bless the souls of those who were murdered.

Jim Hall

brookstexas
July 8, 2003, 11:09 PM
That a week ago in California a much more sensational murder of this sort happened with hardly any coverage.
A former employee of a Albertsons supermarket who was obsessed with the "Highlander" movies and TV show appeared in a black trenchcoat, pulled out a Samaraui sword and hacked three people to death and injured many more causing almost 50 people to flee.
Americans are used to workplace shootings but getting dismembered by the frozen foods? Hardly a blip on the news radar.
If that would have been a store in Texas I doubt he would have needed to wait for the police to be shot to death.
As far as the Lockheed shootings when is some bright attorney going to sue THEM as they don't allow guns in the workplace but also don't provide you with protection?
BT

another okie
July 8, 2003, 11:17 PM
The world is indeed a stressful place today, but I don't really believe these sorts of things are all that new. The peasants used to get tired of working for nothing and occasionally just smash everyone and everything they could reach. We just have better media.

0007
July 9, 2003, 06:31 AM
No mention of the race of his victims means probably none were the minorities that he supposedly hated. Time to re-write the "aw" ban to include shotguns :banghead: :banghead:

As a former employee of LM and having worked in a plant similar to this one, I have to wonder why somebody didn't start throwing things at the guy. Wrenches, screwdrivers, tools of any kind. It must be the mindset of the times - "someone will come and take care of this problem/me. :uhoh:

12GA
July 9, 2003, 09:42 AM
and it doesn't appear that the .223 rifle was even fired. Victims appear to have been chosen randomly. Eight of the 14 shooting victims were black, including four of the five fatalities.

Police Seek Plant Shooting Motive (http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=149482&category=Nation&BCCode=NATIONMAIN&newsdate=7/9/2003)

Miss. Police Seek Plant Shooting Motive

By MATT VOLZ, Associated Press
Last updated: 8:35 a.m., Wednesday, July 9, 2003

MERIDIAN, Miss. -- Police were trying to determine why an assembly-line worker described as "mad at the world" left a business meeting at an aircraft parts plant only to return and gun down 14 colleagues, killing five.
Doug Williams shot himself Tuesday following his lethal rampage at the Lockheed Martin plant. Co-workers said the 48-year-old worker had had run-ins with management and several fellow employees.

Some of the 138 employees at the plant said Williams, who was white, was known as a racist who did not like blacks. Eight of the 14 shooting victims were black, including four of the five fatalities.

Nevertheless, Sheriff Billy Sollie said it appeared Williams fired at random. "There was no indication it involved race or gender as far as his targets were concerned," Sollie said.

Hubert Threat, who has worked at the Lockheed Martin plant since the 1980s, said Williams was "mad at the world." He said Williams, employed at the plant since 1984, had a big heart, "but then 'boom!' it's like Jekyll and Hyde."

"This man had an issue with everybody," Threat said. "It's not just about race. It was just the excuse he was looking for."

The shooting stunned residents of Meridian, a city of 40,000 near the Alabama line whose economy is largely dependent on the military. It's home to the Lockheed plant, a naval air station and an Air National Guard training center.

"We know one another, almost everyone knows someone who works in the building, or has a relative who works in the building," said Craig Hitt, president of the Lauderdale County Board of Supervisors.

Williams and other employees were attending an annual business ethics meeting that the company requires of all its workers when he left. He returned with a 12-gauge shotgun, a .223-caliber semiautomatic rifle and a bandolier of ammunition.

Police said Williams, dressed in a black T-shirt and camouflage pants, shot several of the meeting's participants in an annex next to the plant before moving on to the main factory, where he shot at least three others.

Several co-workers said they were not surprised when Williams was identified as the killer.

"When I first heard about it, he was the first thing that came to my mind," said Jim Payton, who is retired from the plant but had worked with Williams for about a year.

One victim was Lanette McCall of Cuba, Ala., 47, a black woman who had worked at the plant 15 years. Her husband, Bobby McCall, said she expected Williams to harm someone someday and that Williams had made racist threats in the past.

"Obviously he was sick," McCall said. "I wish somebody had given him some help before he ... destroyed my life and my kids' life."

The other dead were identified as Micky Fitzgerald, 45, of Little Rock, Miss.; Sam Cockrell, 46, of Meridian; Charlie Miller, 58, of Meridian; and Thomas Willis, 57, of Lisman, Ala.

"We're going to turn this thing around," said John Willis, Thomas Willis' nephew and a local pastor. "This is life. God in some way will help us get through it."

Sollie said all the shooting victims had been hit by shotgun blasts and there was no evidence the rifle had been fired. Authorities said three other guns were found in Williams' truck in the parking lot.

It was the nation's deadliest workplace shooting since a software tester in Wakefield, Mass., killed seven people the day after Christmas in 2000.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics president Dain Hancock called the shootings "a horrible tragedy, a senseless crime." The plant, located near Meridian, builds parts for C-130J Hercules transport planes and vertical stabilizers for F-22 Raptor fighter jets.

"There are no words that can express the amount sorrow that has been felt by all of those who have been touched," Hancock said. He said the company will provide emotional and financial support for workers at the Mississippi plant.

Gov. Ronnie Musgrove said: "Mississippi's family grieves today for this senseless tragedy. My thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of those lost."

Lockheed Martin is the biggest defense contractor in the United States. The corporation had sales of $24 billion in 2001 and employs about 125,000 people.

Norm357
July 9, 2003, 10:22 AM
I find it odd because the Lockheed Martin Plant here in Atlanta has A ton of armed guards. Where was there security? They were tasked with making parts for the freakin F22 for christs sake!!!
Norm

BamBam
July 9, 2003, 10:46 AM
Some of the 138 employees at the plant said Williams, who was white, was known as a racist who did not like blacks. Eight of the 14 shooting victims were black, including four of the five fatalities.

Nevertheless, Sheriff Billy Sollie said it appeared Williams fired at random. "There was no indication it involved race or gender as far as his targets were concerned," Sollie said.


If you can't see the liberal bias in these two paragraphs, you are too brainwashed to be saved.

BamBam

Apple a Day
July 9, 2003, 11:03 AM
I was just thinking of the stock market crash right before the Great Depression. People made morbid jokes about it raining stock brokers as many of them were jumping out of windows or otherwise bumping themselves off. No mention of any of them walking in and mowing down their coworkers when the bottom fell out, even with the access to firearms.
Someone refresh my historical memory; was that before or after the fed. gov. started restricting automatic weapons? I remember seeing an ad for the Thompson submachine gun marketing towards civilians- it had a cowboy with a tommygun on it but can't recall the year.
What a different mindset.

Pebcac
July 9, 2003, 11:21 AM
Apple, you make an excellent point! Still, antis will ignore it like they do all other common sense, even when it's obvious. That's because the societal mindset has changed. Back then, it was, "What am I going to do now?" Today, it's "Who's fault is this, who can I blame, because my happiness isn't my responsibility. It's society's fault." Our culture today is not one of personal responsibility; rather, it's a collective blame game.

I feel really bad for the lost and their families, especially because of the pointlessness of the deaths. One guy is a non-coping loser, so he whacks people he works with because "it's not his fault." :fire:

cordex
July 9, 2003, 12:36 PM
CNN is reporting that the rifle was a Mini-14 and still saying that it wasn't even used.

RustyHammer
July 9, 2003, 01:01 PM
They don't need guns (CCW), Security was on top of things! (Yeah, right)

This is a good example of why people SHOULD be allowed to fully exercise their Second Amendment Rights, should they so desire.

Very sad.

Wayne D
July 9, 2003, 01:39 PM
I was just thinking of the stock market crash right before the Great Depression. People made morbid jokes about it raining stock brokers as many of them were jumping out of windows or otherwise bumping themselves off. No mention of any of them walking in and mowing down their coworkers when the bottom fell out, even with the access to firearms.
Someone refresh my historical memory; was that before or after the fed. gov. started restricting automatic weapons? I remember seeing an ad for the Thompson submachine gun marketing towards civilians- it had a cowboy with a tommygun on it but can't recall the year.
What a different mindset.


I believe the stock market crash was in 1929 and the machine gun law was in 1934.

braindead0
July 9, 2003, 01:55 PM
They and all the other companies we work for never will get a clue. To much of a liability I guess.

We need to make it too much of a liability *not* to allow CCW. I'm not sure if it could be a good case, but if you are denied the means of self defense by an employer, doesn't that employer take on the responsibility?

gun-fucious
July 10, 2003, 01:31 AM
mini 14:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/030709/168/4mu6a.html

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20030709/capt.1057779853.plant_shooting_rvs103.jpg

Autolite
July 10, 2003, 01:35 AM
The post by SHAGGY nailed it best. Most people nowadays feel that they are "owed" everything. I see these attitudes and the enormity of the problems they generate on a daily basis. For anyone interested, there's a book entitled "Toxic Coworkers" 'How to Deal with Dysfunctional People on the Job'. The book is a real eye opener. There's alot more of these boaderline sociopaths out there than you might think. Recognising the personality disorders and knowing ahead of time who the dangerous ones are might give you the advantage ...

gun-fucious
July 10, 2003, 11:30 AM
Press Release

Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence
United with the Million Mom March
1225 Eye Street, NW
Washington, DC 20005

www.bradycampaign.org

Contact:
Peter Hamm
Phone: 202-898-0792

Washington, DC - Mike Barnes, President of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun
Violence United with the Million Mom March, released the following statement:

"This morning, a tragic shooting occurred at a Lockheed Martin plant near
Meridian, Mississippi. As of now, six are dead including the gunman, and at least
eight others are injured. Our thoughts go out to the families of those lost,
as well as the injured people and their families.

"We need to do everything in our power to support law enforcement as they
sort out the terrible details of his horrible crime. In the wake of yet another
horrible mass shooting, Congress and President Bush need no more reminders of
why they should work to re-authorize and strengthen the federal ban on assault
weapons. While we don't yet know what weapon was used in this tragedy, we do
know that rapid-fire assault weapons are designed for this type of terrible
assault."

Waitone
July 10, 2003, 11:40 AM
Can't say Brady is dancing on the graves of the victims because the victims ain't been buried yet! GGGrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

I suppose the shotgun will be added to the AWB.


:barf:

gun-fucious
July 10, 2003, 11:45 AM
Miss. Killer Said to Receive Counseling
http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=149482&category=Nation&BCCode=NATIONMAIN&newsdate=7/9/2003
_
By MATT VOLZ, Associated Press
Last updated: 4:41 a.m., Thursday, July 10, 2003


MERIDIAN, Miss. -- He made threatening remarks at work and was reprimanded. Anger counseling didn't seem to help: co-workers said they continued to fear him.

Doug Williams, the 48-year-old assembly-line worker at a Lockheed Martin aircraft parts plant, had a troubled past long before he walked through the factory this week, spraying gunfire at colleagues.

Five people were killed and nine others injured in Tuesday's rampage before Williams turned the 12-gauge shotgun on himself. That morning he had attended a business ethics meeting on how to get along with co-workers.

"You could see something in his face. He snapped," said Hubert Threatt, a union shop steward who had worked with Williams for 15 years and pleaded with him not to shoot people.

Tuesday was not the first time Williams had had problems at work and company officials know of at least two prior incidents over his 19-year career there, said Dain Hancock, president of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.

A community memorial service for the victims was to be held Thursday at First Baptist Church in Meridian.

Williams, who was white, had undergone anger counseling at least once in the past couple of years, frustrated because he thought black people had a leg up in society, co-workers said.

They said Williams also was angry that he had been passed over for promotions at the plant. Co-workers said he kept "score" on whoever he thought was offending him.

Hancock said the 2001 confrontation was the only one listed in Williams' personnel file, but that a June 12 incident in which Williams wore a white covering over his head had been reported. He said another employee found the covering offensive. Co-workers have said the covering resembled clothing worn by Ku Klux Klansmen.

Williams chose to leave rather than remove the covering, Hancock said. In what Hancock called a mutual agreement, Williams did not return to work for about five or six days.

"Both incidents were taken seriously and handled promptly," Hancock said. "This company does not tolerate harassment."

Threatt said other employees had expressed concerns to managers about Williams over the years. Threatt said company counselors came to the plant two years ago to work with Williams.

Threatt said Williams was generally quiet after the counseling but once told him: "One of these days, they're going to (expletive) me off and I'm going to come here and shoot some people."

On Tuesday, Williams sat in a meeting with managers, listening to them explain the importance of being honest and responsible in the workplace. Also on the agenda: getting along with co-workers, regardless of their sex or race.

At some point during the meeting Williams walked out of the room, telling co-workers, "Y'all can handle this."

Minutes later, he returned with a shotgun and a rifle. He sprayed the room with shotgun blasts, killing two people, and then continued the rampage on the factory floor, leaving three more co-workers dead before taking his own life.

"He said, `I told you about (expletive) with me,'" said co-worker Brenda Dubose, who had been in the meeting and was shot in the hand.

TheOtherOne
July 10, 2003, 01:12 PM
Congress and President Bush need no more reminders of why they should work to re-authorize and strengthen the federal ban on assault weapons. While we don't yet know what weapon was used in this tragedy, we do know that rapid-fire assault weapons are designed for this type of terrible assault.:rolleyes: Oh, yes, of course. My local gun shops always has a "Co-Worker Assault Special" sign on the AK's and AR's.

:fire: :fire:

Carlos Cabeza
July 10, 2003, 01:21 PM
There's alot more of these boaderline sociopaths out there than you might think. Recognising the personality disorders and knowing ahead of time who the dangerous ones are might give you the advantage ...

I don't have time at work to psycho-analyze every single person in the plant. That should be the responsibility of the management or the HR Dept.
I think your comment does more to incite fear and a fair amount of distrust among co-workers. The man who committed the crime made several remarks as to his potential mental condition and should have been dealt with much sooner. There is little if any indicative behavior that would indentify someone with such extreme potential. The short and sweet of this case is that the man's heart was filled with hate, and nothing could have changed him except himself. Hate in any form is detrimental to growth and limits a man's mind from experiencing more profound and depth defining emotions. Everyone should do whatever necessary to put that emotion away for good and this world would be a much better and safer place.

Waitone
July 10, 2003, 01:25 PM
Congress and President Bush need no more reminders of why they should work to re-authorize and strengthen the federal ban on assault weapons. While we don't yet know what weapon was used in this tragedy, we do know that rapid-fire assault weapons are designed for this type of terrible assault.Ah, yes. The ol' woulda, coulda, shoulda argument. About a shallow a form of logic as I've ever seen.

MeekandMild
July 10, 2003, 11:00 PM
There is a lot to be said for banning psychobabble in the workplace.

only1asterisk
July 11, 2003, 03:09 AM
This is how things should have gone.

Report: Disturbed Factory Prevented From Workplace Shooting Spree

Tuesday, July 08, 2003

MERIDIAN, Miss. — Many people were saved a workplace shooting in Mississippi Tuesday.

Lauderdale County authorities said a gunman opened fire at a Lockheed Martin plant outside Meridian. Sheriff Billy Sollie told reporters that the gunman had been shot, prevented him from killing anyone.

Meridian Mayor John Robert Smith confirmed to Fox News that there had been "one death, no injuries," and that the shooter was "no longer a threat," but that he had no further information.

A sheriff's dispatcher said she could not confirm reports of the shooter’s death, or the identity of the Lockheed Martin employee that used his legally carried handgun to stop the violence before any innocent victims were killed.
"All we can say at this point is that there was a shooting out at Lockheed and people were injured," the dispatcher said. "The sheriff is on the scene."

A local radio reporter told Fox News that the gunman, whom he described as a current employee, was armed with a shotgun and rifle.

Officials at the plant declined to comment and a Lockheed Martin national spokeswoman was unavailable to immediately provide details.

"We're just trying to gather information and are working with state and local authorities to determine the details of the incident," said spokeswoman Meaghan Mariman from the company's Bethesda, Md., headquarters.

The plant builds structural subassemblies for the C-130J Hercules transport plane and the F-22 Raptor fighter-bomber.

Lockheed Martin is the largest defense contractor in the United States. The corporation had sales of $24 billion in 2001. It employs about 125,000 people.

Subsidiary Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co. is based in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Associated Press contributed to this

Quintin Likely
July 11, 2003, 08:34 AM
The plant builds structural subassemblies for the C-130J Hercules transport plane and the F-22 Raptor fighter-bomber.

Lockheed Martin is the largest defense contractor in the United States. The corporation had sales of $24 billion in 2001. It employs about 125,000 people.

Manufacturing subassemblies for the our latest generation fighting plane and being the largest defense contractor in the US, where *are* the armed security guards?

And the Brady Campaign can go :cuss: themselves. Spineless lowlifes, using this incident to further their cause.

BudS
July 12, 2003, 01:11 AM
There was an update on one of the radio stations here in Mobile that Williams had just exited "sensitivity training". See what forced liberalism and feminization/emasculation of men accomplish? Nothing but liberal slop. Needless to say, he was dangerous & should have been taken out of the mainstream workforce at Lockheed Martin.

I just left an ultra-liberal company located in a bad part of town, who disarmed us- before the buy-out, no problem, afterward, even a conversation about guns, etc. would get you fired! The one I work for now has a no weapon policy in their handbook, but it's still in the same part of town, and "they" look the other way- especially if we have to come in afterhours.

Watch out- the Boxers, Lautenbergs, Clintons, etc. will be pushing S1034 and HR2038 harder than ever now!:uhoh: :what: :barf: :fire: :cuss:

RAY WOODROW 3RD
July 12, 2003, 07:50 AM
It was "Ethics Training" BudS and it is not a bad thing to go through. I said it before and I will say it again, Lockheed is a great company to work for minus the fact that you cannot carry in work. I live in NJ and cannot carry at all anyway!

How many other people here are allowed to carry at work? I thought so.

This in not a Lockheed problem but a perception problem with the way company policy and people in general view guns and gun ownership. They do not understand that if a person wants to carry they will do it regardless of the laws on the books. That only leaves the law abiding defenseless. We have a lot of work to do in changing the perception of gunners. 9/11 made some of the sheeple stop their grazing and lift their heads to see what is really going on, the others we will be unable to save. They will not see the light until they or someone they love is attacked. Even that might only push them further into denial and the mantra of "We need MORE gun control!".

BudS
July 18, 2003, 12:41 AM
Yup, you're right, Ray...the newspaper's around here somewhere, but this guy had a problem with EVERYBODY, didn't he?

Even though the company I last worked for and the company I presently work for have similar "Workplace Violence" standards, one of the top, top men told one of my fellow workers personally that IF the company had a problem with his CCW, he'd be the first to go, and they KNOW he carries everywhere! In conversation with others, management doesn't seem to have a problem if you're a law-abiding CCW licensee coming in after-hours in the various 'hoods we work in, for self-protection- what they have the language in the employee handbooks for is legal reasons, so that no one can threaten another if they have a tiff, etc.

I wish that the politically-correct language could be stricken from all comapnies and instead be replaced with common-sense language referring to CCW, etc. Not that I would carry during normal work hours, but since there are only a couple of us closing in the evening, it would be more reassuring if one or both of us could carry as we walked out the door.

And, Ray, it sure would be nice if we could hit the politicos & lawyers between the eyes & get it legal in NJ for you to carry! I'll tell Santa I want that for Christmas for you!:D

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