Which pistol for home protection?


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Dynasty
September 25, 2007, 12:01 PM
What would be a good, reliable pistol to use for home protection? My dad is thinking about getting a pistol because we are moving to rural area and feels a lot safer having a pistol in the house at all times. The budget is under $600. He is fairly new to firearms in general so something that is reliable and easy to maintain is a must. Ammo must be cheap and readily available. From time to time he would like to take it to the range so an accurate guns is always a plus.

Thanks for your time.

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Brian Williams
September 25, 2007, 12:02 PM
Find a good S&W model 10, used police surplus can be found fairly inexpensively.

Anna's Dad
September 25, 2007, 12:28 PM
If you're interested in an Auto, I use a Ruger P345 for home protection. Very reliable and way under you budget! .45 isn't the cheapest ammo, but its not crazy expensive. There are, of course, 9mm Rugers that are similar in design but I prefer the .45 for HD.

I also have a S&W M&P 9mm that I like alot. I haven't owned it long enough to trust it for self/home defence, but its super accurate, feels great in my hands and has been 100% so far.

You'll now get about a million recommendations for Glock and Springfield XD...

glockman19
September 25, 2007, 12:36 PM
What would be a good, reliable pistol to use for home protection?
Glock 19.

The budget is under $600.

Glock 19 $450-$550

easy to maintain is a must.

Glock 19

Ammo must be cheap and readily available

9mm Glock 19

Bottom line is it's reliable, accurate and practically indestructible.

qbpc
September 25, 2007, 12:39 PM
Semi autos
Glock
Ruger P series
CZ

Revolvers
S&W 686
Ruger GP100

PinoyInFL
September 25, 2007, 12:45 PM
I'll second the Smith & Wesson 686. It's a .357 magnum revolver so there's plenty of power. You can use .38 special (cheaper ammo) for practice. Simple, easy to use, easy to clean, no takedown required.

sm
September 25, 2007, 12:56 PM
Brian Williams wrote: Find a good S&W model 10, used police surplus can be found fairly inexpensively.

Agree!!

ozwyn
September 25, 2007, 12:57 PM
My advice, for whatever it is worth.

1) Spend about 50 bucks and have him take a NRA basic pistol class
2) spend another 50 bucks and have him take the NRA personal protection class

lots of overlap, but spending about 100 bucks on getting a good education on how to hold a pistol, hwo to shoot/clean a handgun, and usually you willg et to handle 10-15 different frames across the 2 classes.

Now he is armed to make a real good decision on what fits him - then he can consider used police Smiths, rugers, glocks, etc and make smart buys based on his ergonomics.

More importantly, your Dad is mentally invested in the gun. More dry firing, more practice, more range time, which translates into more skill and better likelyhood of excellent judgement should he need it.

I wish when I got started into the hobby someone had drummed this into me better.

That's my opinion

slow944
September 25, 2007, 01:38 PM
Get a nice 357 with a 4"bbl and you'll have one of the vest and easiest to operate SD guns on the market.

hso
September 25, 2007, 02:38 PM
First find out what fits (http://www.corneredcat.com/FirstGun/tryongun.aspx) him. His learning curve on using it won't be as steep then.

If it turns out to be a revolver there are tons out there. The model 10s and 686s from S&W always are in favor as are the Ruger SP101s and GP100s.

If it turns out to be an auto you can save money on BHPs and 1911s by looking at the FM version of the Hi Power and the various 1911's made off shore. Used Glocks have been mentioned. Trade in Sigs come available from time to time in that price range. NIB CZs are available also.

Second the courses.

DawgFvr
September 25, 2007, 02:42 PM
I carry the .38 Special and .357 magnum. At home I keep a .45 ACP on my night stand. With warning, I go with my 12 ga. shotty. No warning...I go for the .45 ACP. The .45 is high capacity and has far less report (your ears will love you for it) for inside dwellings.

novaDAK
September 25, 2007, 02:51 PM
being new to firearms, I'd say any .357 revolver or a Glock 9mm (or a gun of similar design) because they're easy to learn. Easy to know if they're loaded or not and once loaded there's no "decock" or 'safety' levers to think about :)

The Bushmaster
September 25, 2007, 03:07 PM
Absolutely...S & W Model 10. An excellent choice. I have two in the bedroom. My wife's is a 2" snubby and mine is a 4" Royal Hong Kong Police turn in...Both loaded with 140 grain SJHP +P

CountGlockula
September 25, 2007, 03:25 PM
A Glock 17 and encourage him to take some self defense classes.

Brian Williams
September 25, 2007, 04:00 PM
Notice that the only company recommended by those with "glock" in their name is a glock.
No problem with Glocks, they are simple, rugged, they simply work, But those recommending them should add that the only safetys basically are the mind attached to the trigger becasue as soon as you put your trigger finger insdie the guard, it is ready to fire.

Look at the following for New shooters

The high power, browning or FN or FM.
the 1911, Warning should be carried cocked and locked
S&W model 10, 13, 60 686/586, 19, 65, 67, 64, any model in 38/357 that is based on the M&P.
Ruger SP101, Both the Speed/Security six and the GP100 line.
Also look at Ruger's P95 and 97 series of autos.
HK's are pricy but good guns
CZ75 are well known
SIGs hold their own,
and Many others.

Read, Research and fit the gun to the shooter with Training, Could be even lots of range time.



Dry Fire Warning, before you talk about dryfiring, make sure the ammunition is in another room and secured.
this is unloaded practice which can consist of drawing and firing from a holster, drawer, safe(get one if the gun is to be kept loaded in the house). also gives trigger time so the Software in our head knows what and how the Hardware functions.

Ala Dan
September 25, 2007, 04:17 PM
If No gun at all for home 'D, I agree on the S&W model 10 .38 Special. ;)

Otherwise, there are lots of good ones out there; both revolvers and semi-
auto's. As stated, the S&W model 66/686 is a also a good choice; shoot
.38 Special for practice, then load either with 125 grain .357 magnums for
home D'. Also, in semi-auto's its hard too beat the .45 ACP. In which, my
choice would be either the world reknown SIG-SAUER P220A; or the fast
rising Springfield Armory XD-F~! :scrutiny::D

Never No More
September 25, 2007, 04:33 PM
The best thing you can use for home defense is an 870 remmy pump shotgun

RustyShackelford
September 25, 2007, 04:37 PM
If I were you or your Dad, I would keep a Ruger SP-101 DA only model in .357mag/.38spl there for protection/limited target use. This SP-101 is stainless steel and is easy to oil/clean. It holds 5 rounds of .357mag or .38spl( I would suggest a factory +P+ or +P .38spl round for protection). The Ruger SP-101 is also small and can slip in a robe or coat pocket w/o any snags or tears because it has no hammer spur. DA only revolvers/pistols are in use by many sworn LEOs and firearm experts because the avoid the false claims of "accidents" or "cocked hammers" as the cause of a shooting. My first handgun was a Ruger SP-101 .357mag DA only and I would buy another one if I needed a solid well made firearm. ;)

Rusty

PS: These are good loads for CC/home protection; Speer Gold Dot 135gr JHP bonded +P 38spl, CorBon 110gr +P+ 38spl, 125gr JHP .357mag, Glaser silver safety slugs; .38spl or .357mag, Magsafe .357magnum load.
www.ruger.com

CWL
September 25, 2007, 04:38 PM
Our Mods here give good advice, listen to them.

Your father should go to a shooting range and rent several guns in different calibers to get a feel on what gun & caliber may be correct for him. He should determne whether a revolver or semiautomatic would best fit his hands and needs. Only after he has done this should he try to narrow down what would be the best purchase for him and family.

Also, for a rural area, a pump shotgun may be even handier.

Obiwan
September 25, 2007, 05:48 PM
I don't have glock in my name so I will just recommend a 9mm

Cheapest ammo available...and practice is more important than caliber or platform

I would however make sure that whatever you get WILL go bang if you pull the trigger...(like most all loaded weapons will)

Anything else truly is unsafe

Counting on any buttons, switches, levers or locks to make them "safe(r)"

Is just silly

ninja45
September 25, 2007, 06:28 PM
I vote with the rest who said, "a good .357 revolver". You can load up with 38 specials for practice and then load up .357 mag for defense. The revolver is less likely to jam and for a first time shooter, easier to master the manual of arms.

My .02 cents.

Ninja45

mosesv2
September 25, 2007, 06:46 PM
This is the easiest question to answer.... but has to be answered by you!

The absolute best pistol for [personal] defense (prefer a 12 guage for HD) is the one that you are most comforatble with and shoot the best with. My carry handgun is not my favoite pistol that I own... In fact it is not even close to my favorite, but it is reliable and the one that can get 2 shots to center of mass the fastest. Every single gun made has a fanbase for different but important reasons for each owner.

It makes no difference what brand or caliber I use because my choice will likely not translate to you. For example .45 acp is the cheapest ammo for me because I reload a ton of it.

Nearly any handgun 9mm/.38spl and bigger that feels good in his hand and is made from any of the major gunmakers. New, or used (not abused) will be a great choice!!

Plastic frame? Any Glock, XD, FN, M&P, Walther, Beretta, Sig Pro, HK, or Ruger will be a great choice, if YOU like the way it feels, and are comforatble with the controls.

Steel/alloy frame? CZ, Sig, Browning, FN, EAA, Beretta, 1911... Lots of GREAT new and used choices.

Revolver? Tons of GREAT choices in the used market for WAY less than your budget... Both Ruger and S&W are solid choices. You could buy a nice police trade in (model 64, 65, 10, 13.... ) AND an 870 shotgun for around 600.

I would just go to a gunshop & fondle guns until I found the one I like the best.... Remember though, your tastes, needs and wants will change over time. That is why most of us have a lot more that one... they are all good.

kmrcstintn
September 25, 2007, 06:56 PM
there are 10,001 ways to approach this and none of them are particularly wrong...depends upon the level of familiarity and taste in weaponry that you like...

with that said, a good quality .38 special duty size revolver w/ 4" barrel is an excellent choice for people that are new to handguns or don't plan to invest alot of time/money to train (FTE/FTF clearing drills, manipulation of safety levers, etc)

eg: my father is very familiar and comfortable with revolvers from using them for military, cilivian, and government contract security work, as well as a hunting sidearm; he is 76 years old and won't be privy to spending several hours over multiple weekends trying to learn to use a semiautomatic handgun; he will be living with me in @ 2 months and I wanted a 'common' area housegun that both of us can use; I traded in a great Beretta 92 (9mm semiatuo) on a Smith & Wesson 64 (.38 spl revolver) and got in store credit for the differential of the trade in value...

he will need 1 session to get familiar and then 1 or 2 quick refreshers/year to keep competent; if I didn't think of the greater good and kept the semiatuo out of selfishness, he wouldn't have a handgun he could easily use and I couldn't live with myself if he got injured or killed over a lousy handgun that can be replaced later on

doc2rn
September 25, 2007, 08:55 PM
Dang it Brian beat me to it
+1 on the S&W model 10 and for that price you can get a 12 g to accompany it.

Brian Williams
September 25, 2007, 09:04 PM
I also forgot the Keltecs PF-9 and the P-11 and the larger Kahrs

CSA 357
September 25, 2007, 11:01 PM
kiss! a good used 38 or 357 revolver, should fit the bill,but if he could fire differnt type hand guns he would know what he likes, i have a glock 21 with nite sights hanging on my bed post, but my mod 12 winchester is very close by, csa:D

Don Lu
September 25, 2007, 11:19 PM
based on your criteria...another vote for Glock, 17 or 19. low(est) cost ammo besides .22, very reliable, in your budget and easy to maintain. I have others, my Glock is my favorite,YMMV

Alaskapopo
September 25, 2007, 11:37 PM
I would recommend a Glock 17. Very simple auto to learn to shoot well. The 9mm is a fine round despite some claims to the contrary and the gun is extreemly robust and reliable as well as accurate. There are plenty of good choices but this in my opinion is the best for new shooters. The revolver option is also fine. But revolvers are a tad harder to shoot well due to the da trigger pull. Reloading is also far more difficult and the Glock has three times the capacity of a 6 shot revolver.
Pat

19-3Ben
September 26, 2007, 12:13 AM
I'll give a hearty +1 and two thumbs up to everyone who recommended a .357 or .38 spl revolver. Cheap used, accurate, easy to handle, variety of ammo...

Deaf Smith
September 26, 2007, 12:18 AM
UZI pistol. Mount a Sure-fire light and a sling. Nice thing is, being in 9mm the blast ain't to bad inside a house. If you can't fine a UZI, then a Tec-9 will do.

Landlocked Pirate
September 26, 2007, 09:54 AM
I've seen numerous recommendations for the Glock 17 and for .357/.38 revolvers. I have both and keep them both loaded, but the revolvers are the ones I keep beside my bed for simplicity of operation for when being wakened suddenly. I keep the Glock stashed in the living room.

Hook686
September 26, 2007, 10:44 AM
Dynasty wrote:


What would be a good, reliable pistol to use for home protection? My dad is thinking about getting a pistol because we are moving to rural area and feels a lot safer having a pistol in the house at all times. The budget is under $600. He is fairly new to firearms in general so something that is reliable and easy to maintain is a must. Ammo must be cheap and readily available. From time to time he would like to take it to the range so an accurate guns is always a plus.

Thanks for your time.


I got my dad a Glock 19, 9mm pistol (semi-automatic). You asked about a pistol, some folks been bringing up revolvers. A revolver is my personal choice, but my dad had trouble loading cylinders, especiAlly in the dark. He did better with a magazine.

The 9mm is cheap ammo, readily available and a mild round to shoot. In other words my dad will go to the range and practice with 115 grain FMJ Blazers.

Good luck ... I think just about any hand gun has a "Feel more secure" attitude attached to it, but the one dad will actually buy ammunition for and practice with is the one that counts in my book.

kmrcstintn
September 26, 2007, 11:12 AM
You asked about a pistol, some folks been bringing up revolvers.

interchangable wording...

tomato vs tomatoe; potato vs potatoe; pistol vs handgun...:p

if you want to talk 'semiautomatic pistols' I withdraw my recommendation since I do not own of of those critters anymore ;)

mnw42
September 26, 2007, 12:03 PM
I use a S&W 22-4 .45 ACP. the .45 is a proven stopper without the penetration of a .357. Full moon-clips are a fast reload too.

IndianaBoy
September 26, 2007, 12:08 PM
CZ 75B


Accurate, easy to maintain, inexpensive (relatively) ammo (9mm), very reliable, good capacity, fits most people's hand well..... all around excellent pistol.

GRIZ22
September 26, 2007, 12:14 PM
My vote goes to a 4" 357 revolver, not in any particular order,S&W, Colt, Ruger, or Taurus. This is probably the best do it all handgun made. Power level from wadcutters to standard to +P to +P+ to full magnums. You pick what you're comfortable with. The manual of arms is also easier with a revolver vs any auto pistol.

The budget you mention buys one of these and has enough left over for a basic handgun class which is just as necessary as the gun. Unless you're a NRA, LE or CCW instructor it's best to get educated by someone who is certified to do so. Much better than "Charlie and I went down to the gravel pit to shoot and told me I can blast anyone who messes with my stuff".

D-Man
September 26, 2007, 12:50 PM
I didn't see a mention of this (and if it was, sorry I missed it), but look at getting something that has night sights. You'll probably have much more luck with a semi-auto for this, as they are readily available or can be installed easily. Yes, revolvers have them and can get them, but sometimes it may take a little more work.

Hokkmike
September 26, 2007, 12:53 PM
Let me answer generally.

In pistols get a 9mm. Very adequate for the job, cheap ammo, and accurate.

In revolvers buy a .357 magnum. More than sufficiently powerful, ubiquitous, accurate, and you can also use .38 special rounds for plinking and traget.

Get a barrel between at least 4 - 6 inches for sighting and accuracy.

As far as the particular weapon goes, select one based on simplicity, comfort of fit, reliability, and YOUR price limit!......I guess you just want to stay away from the really cheap models. (generally, there is a reason they are cheap)

If it was my FIRST handgun I probably would get a Ruger GP100 in .357 magnum. The 686's is a great weapon but a little more expensive.

Good luck!

glockman19
September 26, 2007, 01:10 PM
You asked about a pistol, some folks been bringing up revolvers.

This is why I recommended a Glock. Had he asked about Revolvers I would have recommended a S&W 686 or Ruger GP or SP Revolver.

.455_Hunter
September 26, 2007, 01:40 PM
The bedroom gun for my wife and I is a 1960's production Colt PPS .38 Special 4" that went to South America as a police duty gun and returned with a brown patina, holster wear, worn grips, and an action smoother than most Pythons (Thank you Mr. Nameless Police Armorer). My wife is not "into" guns, but she is totally familar with that weapon and shoots excellent groups with it. We keep it loaded with Winchester's 158 gr. LSWC (standard pressure) to acheive adequate penetration and tissue distruption with minimized muzzle blast and flash. I think any quality .38/.357 is an excellent choice, just make sure the user is well versed with its operation.

easyg
September 26, 2007, 01:55 PM
What would be a good, reliable pistol to use for home protection? My dad is thinking about getting a pistol because we are moving to rural area and feels a lot safer having a pistol in the house at all times. The budget is under $600. He is fairly new to firearms in general so something that is reliable and easy to maintain is a must. Ammo must be cheap and readily available. From time to time he would like to take it to the range so an accurate guns is always a plus.

Thanks for your time.
Since it will primarily be a home defense handgun, concealment is not a big deal, right?

So for an auto I would recommend either a CZ 75B SA (Single Action) .40 or a Glock 35 (also a .40 and with extended barrel and slide).
Both of these have outstanding accuracy and reliability.

For a revolver I would recommend either a Ruger GP100 with 4" or 6" barrel, or a S&W 686 4" or 6" barrel.

Good luck,
Easy

Alaskapopo
September 26, 2007, 02:00 PM
QUOTE
I've seen numerous recommendations for the Glock 17 and for .357/.38 revolvers. I have both and keep them both loaded, but the revolvers are the ones I keep beside my bed for simplicity of operation for when being wakened suddenly. I keep the Glock stashed in the living room.
END QUOTE

The glock is equally simple to a revolver to fire if you are woken up suddenly just point/aim and pull the trigger. Same thing goes for the revolver.
Pat

dodging230grainers
September 26, 2007, 06:19 PM
For a home defense pistol, nothing beats a 4" revolver IMO.

My suggestion would be a Smith and Wesson K-frame, and use the .38 Special "Chicago" load. Then practice alot...

10-Ring
September 26, 2007, 06:24 PM
If there are no other guns in the home, I would go w/ a 4" S&W model 19 -- practice w/ 38 special & load up w/ 357 mag for HD duty.

Warren
September 26, 2007, 06:33 PM
What about Taurus' "The Judge" (http://www.taurususa.com/video/taurus-theJudge-video.cfm)

jaydubya
September 26, 2007, 06:41 PM
Someone above suggested that your father take a self-defense course before choosing the weapon. Completely agree. Not only will he be able to handle several types/models, but he will be forced to consider whether he is willing to shoot for center of mass, rather than at the legs. The legs of a man running at you are very hard to hit. As in real estate, the three most important principles of self defense shooting are location, location, location.
Cordially, Jack

S&Wfan
September 27, 2007, 01:55 AM
For about $650, why not get TWO K-framed, S&W Model 10 police trade-in revolvers. They point so naturally and there's nothing to have to remember when you awake is a daze to the sound of a bad guy in the house.

WHY TWO? It never hurts to have more than one weapon . . . so you can secretly stash the second one somewhere else in the house where no one can find it easily (but that you can access REAL FAST if there's a problem)

For instance, one poster mentioned keeping a gun in his living room. Naturally it is surely so well hidden that no one would ever find it . . . but it is close enough to the front door to get quickly should someone attack your wife as she gets out of the car, a wild dog attacks a neighbor, a BG gets the jump on you outside and forces you inside, etc..

RELIABILITY . . .
You've got "six for sure" in a wheelgun . . . more than adequate and a .38 special is what I'd load for an INSIDE THE HOUSE gun anyway . . . even in a .357.

BARREL LENGTH . . .

Something fairly short, so the BG has very little to grab for if a struggle ensues. Two or three inches of fury is surely long enough. If the BG grabs the short barrel, the sharp front sight will not give him enough to hang onto probably, and a quick yank will probably cause the front sight to cut their hand, while you step back just enough to pull the trigger.

ALSO . . . get a good "tactical"-type flashlight. Mine is a Streamlight "Scorpion" with 111 lumen brightness that will totally blind a BG in the house and turn the tables in your favor!

I do NOT recommend an auto for a novice shooter. Too much can go wrong in the dark that a novice would not have the experience to overcome.

Third . . . at my house there's a rule, treat all guns as if they are loaded . . . because they ARE! An unloaded nighttime house gun . . . will get you killed. Naturally, those with young kids or lots of juveniles around cannot do this.

BigO01
September 27, 2007, 06:43 PM
I would go with a new Taurus 357 model 66 in stainless steel with a 4 inch barrel .

I bought a used model 669 for $250 a couple of years ago and it is every bit as good as the S&W 586 I owned years ago . Unfortunately prices even on these have risen so why buy used when new is just literally a few dollars more .

The new 66's come with a 7 shot cylinder and adjustable sights with red front and white outline rear .

If you want to spend $600 total I would augment the home armory with either a second revolver as S&Wfan suggests or go to Walmart and pick up either a Mossberg model 500 12 or 20 gauge shotgun or a Remington 870 .

I prefer the Mossberg as it's safety is a tang mounted one that is ambidextrous . At a later date when you get up a little more money replace the 28 inch barrel with one of the 18 or 20 inch ones for a little over $100 at any Bass Pro shop or Cabelas or order from their catalog .

mgregg85
September 27, 2007, 09:07 PM
Have him try an XD, preferably in .45 ACP. Its simple, rugged and reliable while still being safe.

PhrankKastle
September 27, 2007, 09:15 PM
If he's new to firearms I'd definitely go with a Ruger GP100 .357 with either a 3" or 4" barrel. .357 mag can't be beat for HD and if recoil is an issue there are many good .38 loads out there as well.

ACP
September 27, 2007, 09:41 PM
Any S&W revolver or 3rd Gen. semiauto in .45 or 9mm (i.e. 3913, 3953, 4586, etc.)

Edit: I have owned two different factory refurbished Glock 19's (2nd Gen.), purchased at local gun shops. Neither G19 was 100% reliable. My Smith & Wessons have been 100% reliable. YMMV.

Glockafella
September 27, 2007, 11:34 PM
Glock 19 if you want a semi-auto

Ruger GP100 if you want a wheelgun

jeff-10
September 28, 2007, 12:37 AM
Since you didn't say anything about it being concealable I would go with a Glock 17. Truth is there are plenty of handguns out there that would work especially if you were willing to buy used.

amper
September 28, 2007, 04:08 AM
Remember, this for home defense, which for most people is going to mean *inside* the house. For that purpose, other than my current fascination with the Taurus 4510TKR-3MAG, I'd have to say an all-stainless steel medium frame .357 Magnum 4" or less DA revolver loaded with .38 Special low flash rounds. Either a Smith & Wesson 686 or Ruger GP-100 will do the trick, or similar.

1. The medium frame gives you more weight, which will stabilize your aim in a stressful situation, and less recoil, compared to a smaller frame. Only use the smaller frames if your hands don't fit the medium. Remember, this isn't a CCW gun.

2. A revolver can be kept loaded with all springs at rest indefinitely.

3. A 4" or less barrel is more than accurate enough for short ranges, is more maneuverable in tight spaces, and gives less for someone to grab onto.

4. .38 Special, especially if low flash type, is going to have less recoil, less flash, less unintended penetration. Less blinding, less deafening, faster to retrain on target, and safer indoors than heavier loads. A person with less strength than you in your family may need to use the weapon.

5. Stainless generally requires less maintenance.

6. Revolvers are still more reliable than semi-autos.

7. Six or seven shots is more than enough unless you need to take on a group of BGs.

BikerRN
September 28, 2007, 06:06 AM
Remember, this for home defense, which for most people is going to mean *inside* the house. For that purpose, other than my current fascination with the Taurus 4510TKR-3MAG, I'd have to say an all-stainless steel medium frame .357 Magnum 4" or less DA revolver loaded with .38 Special low flash rounds. Either a Smith & Wesson 686 or Ruger GP-100 will do the trick, or similar.

1. The medium frame gives you more weight, which will stabilize your aim in a stressful situation, and less recoil, compared to a smaller frame. Only use the smaller frames if your hands don't fit the medium. Remember, this isn't a CCW gun.

2. A revolver can be kept loaded with all springs at rest indefinitely.

3. A 4" or less barrel is more than accurate enough for short ranges, is more maneuverable in tight spaces, and gives less for someone to grab onto.

4. .38 Special, especially if low flash type, is going to have less recoil, less flash, less unintended penetration. Less blinding, less deafening, faster to retrain on target, and safer indoors than heavier loads. A person with less strength than you in your family may need to use the weapon.

5. Stainless generally requires less maintenance.

6. Revolvers are still more reliable than semi-autos.

7. Six or seven shots is more than enough unless you need to take on a group of BGs.


This is the best advice given so far, besides getting competant instruction from a qualified Instructor.

Come on guys, chances are Dad is going to load the gun and stick it in a drawer and infrequently practice, if at all. Chances are Dad is not going to become a "gunny" and if he does he will select another gun when he's ready. I highly doubt that Dad will be able to do a "Tap Rack Bang Drill" sunconsciously, and that's what you need to be able to do if you are planning on using an autoloader for Home Defense or CCW. See Point #2, there is no need for me to repeat it.

There's nothing wrong with a good revolver. I carry a pair of them daily Off-Duty. :)

Biker

Deanimator
September 28, 2007, 09:41 AM
Glock 19 $450-$550
Shave $100 off of that for a good used Glock 19 from some place like Summit Gun Broker. I bought a used VA Beach Sheriff's Dept. gun from them last year for even less. It's 100% reliable, very accurate and now one of my favorite guns.

RustyHammer
September 28, 2007, 11:01 AM
Revolver: S & W Revolver, .357 Mag, 4" barrel ... several to choose from.

Semi-Auto: Colt 1911 with spare mags

Lots of other fine choices out there (and I have most of them), but these would be my top picks.

Let us know what you go with?

Rusty

possum
September 28, 2007, 05:36 PM
glockman19,
+1
i agree glock 19

Erik
September 30, 2007, 10:14 PM
Those folks recommending used S&W revolvers chambered in .38 and .357 magnum are giving awefully good advice. Especially those pointing out that newer shooters are recommended to shoot .30 special ammunition through them. :)

madcratebuilder
October 1, 2007, 10:18 AM
If your serious about home defense, you should start with a serious weapon.
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/madcratebuilder/crop1.jpg
modded Rem 870pm, backed up by a DA revolver of your choice, if you can handle the recoil, bigger is better.
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/madcratebuilder/PICT0001Medium-1.jpg
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/madcratebuilder/PICT0003Medium.jpg

Training and practice can not be over stated.

Neophyte1
October 1, 2007, 10:25 AM
First line of "home" defense: Shotgun: second line of "home" defense
revolver.
Remington 870
Ruger GP 100

Obiwan
October 1, 2007, 01:17 PM
Unless you are talking about a barricade position ,...as in behind cover with a door closed and all you need to do is shoot through that door when it opens

Then any long gun is at a disadvantage for HD

If you need to manuever through your house ....like to get kids to that safe place...a handgun is better

If you need to open/close doors, switch lights on and off or use a flashlight

a handgun is better

And please don't start in about the racking sound scaring away the bad guys or the "you don't need to aim" with a shotgun...(I said please)

"Come on guys, chances are Dad is going to load the gun and stick it in a drawer and infrequently practice, if at all"

Then Dad should stick with a louisville slugger:D

Deanimator
October 2, 2007, 02:16 PM
If you need to manuever through your house ....like to get kids to that safe place...a handgun is better
+1

Any long gun is a spectacularly bad choice of a primary defensive firearm in my home. The only thing worse would be a longbow or a cavalry lance.

A shotgun is OFTEN a good HD firearm, but not ALWAYS.

DonGlock26
October 3, 2007, 11:59 PM
I'd say Glock19. You can use it for HD, for walking around on the property, as a car gun, or a CCW pistol.

Geronimo45
October 4, 2007, 12:15 AM
PLR-16?

Seriously. It's a pistol by law, takes AR mags and whatever weird sights you want to mount. It sounds like the end of the world when it's fired, which it probably will be.

For cheapest ammo... 9mm or .38 Special take the cake. A revolver's always nice. A 4" barrel or longer would be my suggestion. Ruger and S&W have very low-priced used models around.
If semis are more to your liking, there's many, many good 9mms to chose from.

SgtKnuckles
October 8, 2007, 11:13 PM
As They Say ~ Theirs A New Sheriff In Town ~

_____________________________________________________________________________
1) Hanging "THE JUDGE" on a wall
Picture INFO: "THE JUDGE" & Thunder 5 Holster, with the The Ribber Grip Mod...
http://tinyurl.com/3csmp7
________________________________________________________________________________________
2) "THE JUDGE" has a Holster (full set of Pics)
WooHoo,... I bought the "Thunder 5 Holster" for The Judge, and it fits Perfect...<:-))
http://tinyurl.com/yt4dpp
________________________________________________________________________________________
3) Range Report~"THE JUDGE"
This Gun has a Medium Frame ~ It's just a Puppy ~ hehehe...<:-))
Ahhhhhh, the Smell of Black Powder Burning in the Morning... "S W E E T" ...<:-)) See Pics...
http://tinyurl.com/23le8h
________________________________________________________________________________________
4) Gun Cleaning "THE JUDGE" 101
After a Day at the Range, and a "PILE OF EMPTY CASES" We Gunner's know what happens when We get Home...<:-((
http://tinyurl.com/2qwx6v
________________________________________________________________________________________
5) MY Taurus Ribber Grip MOD...<:-))
Another follow on Report to a Day at the Range, with "THE JUDGE"
"RIBS"~You Say Ribs~I Don't Need No "S T I N K I N G" Middle Finger Ribs...!!!
http://tinyurl.com/yrfncj
________________________________________________________________________________________
6) Gunner's~See My Front Door...!!!
But,... I thought this to be Pertinent Information on a GUN Forum...<:-))
http://tinyurl.com/3yspv9
________________________________________________________________________________________
7) "S W E E T S T E E L"
Gunner's,... Here is My HOME case for "THE JUDGE"...<:-))
http://tinyurl.com/yvrpjq
________________________________________________________________________________________
8) As They Say ~ Theirs A New Sheriff In Town ~

"Theirs A New Frontline Self Defense Gun To Consider"
Tell Me at the end of this Clip, that the First Shot doesn't Lead to Total Incapacitation...!!! The other 4 shots are for Good Measure... Because Dead Men Tell No Tales...!!!...<:-))
The Judge infomercial
The Flick Has A Deadly Ending...!!! Range Action...!!!
A little Info, with some Range BLAST...!!!...<:-))
Please stand to the side, But Never In Front Of "THE JUDGE"
http://tinyurl.com/ypms4e

Personal Note: After taking My Judge to the range and shooting #4 Shot... I can say that 4's are devastating at a close range BLAST...!!! Just like in the Clip...

Also I think were talking Self-Defense here... So Don't Shoot anybody in the Back, or more than 25 Feet away from your Front... OR You May Have Trouble Explaining It To A JUDGE...!!!...<:-))

Good Target Pattern Report on different Loads...
http://tinyurl.com/2s27rs

How would you like having "THE JUDGE" pointed at you and seeing all them Red Winchester Ball Cartrages In That Wheel Looking Back At You... Just seeing a barrel with a 45 Cal. Hole, would normally have everybody running for cover...hehehe...<:-))
http://www.ammobank.com/images1/bucks.GIF
That "little .410" round in OOO Buckshot (3 balls) is roughly equivalent to three rounds of 9mm - simultaneously delivered... The .9mm pistol may be criticized for a lack of stopping power, but there's no doubt that three .360 caliber balls delivered simultaneously packs a serious wallop...<:-))

tbeb
October 10, 2007, 01:37 AM
I have three, one revolver and two pistols. The revolver is a 6-shot Ruger Speed Six .357 magnum with 2 3/4" barrel, and it is loaded with .38 special +P 125 gr. JHP's. One pistol is an 8-shot Springfield Armory .45 ACP with 5" barrel, and it is loaded with Federal Hydra-Shok 230 gr. JHP's. The other pistol is a 16-shot CZ 75 double action only 9mm, and it is loaded with Speer Gold Dot 124 gr. JHP +P. I like all 3. The revolver is for my wife. If it was for just me, then I would load it with more powerful ammunition. Which one would I grab to defend my life? Probably the .45 ACP.

22luvr
October 10, 2007, 10:46 AM
Any .357 mag in stainless steel with a capacity of 6 shots and a barrel length of at least 3 to 4 inches.

* Easy to handle, shoot, and maintain.
* Can shoot .38 spcls for practice and fun
* Good gun for the outdoors
* Anyone can pick it up, aim it at center of mass, and pull da trigger.
* .357 mag ammo is plentiful and about as effective a man-stopper there is

Sorry to respectfully disagree with all of you who are recommending semi-autos in this situation. :evil::fire:

tegemu
October 13, 2007, 10:39 AM
I currently use a 1911 .45 but I am seriously considering a Taurus Judge, .410/.45 Long Colt.

Lonestar49
October 13, 2007, 03:15 PM
Quote: The budget is under $600.
------------
...

They cost NIB 450 - 550 bucks..

They come in either 9mm or 40cal, same gun, as in pics below..

One of the easiest guns to disassemble, inspect, clean, and reassemble out there, bar none.

Reliability, dependability, accurate, unquestionable..

5300 rounds thru my 40cal, without one problem, just 100%

Forgiving gun, as "rotating barrel" absorbs recoil making it, if needed, a good one-hand shooter, making it a very forgiving shooter IMO.

Depending on your State Laws, can carry 10, 14, 17 rounds per magazine.

Mid-full-length gun in length, very narrow in width, and very balanced, comfy, in point to aim..

Comes with 3 back straps that one can change to fit grip to hands..



Only thing I would suggest adding is a Hogue Rubber-fingered slip-on sleeve (14 bucks) for secure grip, with plastic grips, and especially with wet conditions, as shown in pic 2.. Along with, F-models come with Safety-decocker, in-one, and many are coming with real Night Sights, a bonus to have on a new gun, out of the box.

Good luck,


LS


http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc306/Lonestar49/px4no5.jpg

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc306/Lonestar49/px4onegg02nj8.jpg

sb350hp
October 13, 2007, 05:03 PM
A couple questions need to be answered first. 1. How proficient is your dad with a pistol? 2. What is the threat in your rural area? Predators (animals or people?).

If your dad is not real proficient with a handgun but refuses to use something like a shotgun I would compromise and seriously consider the new Taurus "judge". A .410/45colt pistol. It is kind of the best of both worlds. I would not want to face as a home intruder a person armed with buckshot in a 410 since suddenly 5 rounds the really do not need accurate shot placement comes into play.

Any handgun 40,45,9mm,380,38,10mm etc are useless in the hands of a person who cannot fire accurately.

So consider what you are defending yourself from. Maybe a shotgun is the right choice.. Maybe not.

weregunner
October 13, 2007, 10:56 PM
There's been a plethora of excellent recommendations. Do agree with getting the dad to classes first and then go form there.

Revolvers do have simplicity of manual of arms and the ammo that can be tailored to the shooter going for them. Nothing to take apart, no safties to engage, and no levers except the cylinder latch release to manipulate.

Midsize or full size pistols have a lot going for them, too. Caliber may be an issue if this is an older gent. Racking a slide on .45ACP takes more effort than the smaller calibers. Heavier springs to overcome. 9mm. or lesser caliber may be need to be considered.

Granted the .380ACP is weaker than the other major calibers, but may be the compromise caliber for those with strength troubles to consider.

At least the Beretta Tomcat,a .32ACP caliber pistol, has a tip up barrel for easy loading and unloading.
Beretta made a almost full size.380ACP model 86 that has the tip up barrel as well, but this is a used gun guise as of now. Though the on-line auction gun sellers probably have them come through quite often.

magnolia
October 13, 2007, 11:21 PM
First find out what fits him. His learning curve on using it won't be as steep then.

Amen to what fits him. Last year when I decided to take a CHL course, I went out and bought a S&W 910 9mm to practice before taking the course and found that it really didnt fit my hand. I have since bought a Browning 9mm that fits like a glove and I shoot 100% better. That was $350 I could have put toward the Browning. Then I found out that at a nearby firing range, I could have tried out several pistols to see how they fit.

czbegenner
October 14, 2007, 02:11 AM
Glock 22,or kel-teck

obxned
October 14, 2007, 03:19 AM
Get a shotgun.

annielulu
October 14, 2007, 08:41 AM
I keep a Maverick 88 shotgun loaded with 00 buck and the Taurus "Judge" loaded with Corbon 200g JHP'S between my bed and nightstand.

I sleep on the 2nd floor so my 4 dogs will provide ample warning if my house is breached at night.

I carry a Khar PM9 loaded with GD 124+p whenever I am up and about .... ALWAYS.

I carry whenever I am dressed. I'm so used to it that I feel funny when I do not have my carry piece on me.

It's a good feeling.

weregunner
October 14, 2007, 03:50 PM
What we all can't know is the dad's ability to manipulate a weapon. Is he handicapped,are health concerns or problems going to escalate from where they are now if any,and does all that not matter? We have no way to know unless told so.

Advice as to why the revolver may be the way to go would take care of most of that.

For example, there have been a number of threads at various gun forums and this has been published in books and magazine articles that a .32H&R magnum caliber revolver be used for defense. Granted it is not normaly a great defense round,but it may be all the user can shoot realistically or not at all. It would be better than the .32ACP. It's close enough to the .380ACP and some of the .38 Special loads.

There are 12 loads in .32 magnum and 12 in .32 S&W Long that are shown in a 2008 gun buyers catalog.
Then again, if health factors creep in a .22lrf pistol or revolver may be all one can shoot.

Have relatives who can only shoot .22lrf and .32 caliber guns.
We'll see if any other details are forth coming

Phil DeGraves
October 19, 2007, 03:32 PM
The one you shoot the best with.

Dallas Jack
October 20, 2007, 03:55 PM
I would suggest a 12 gauge but if it has to be a pistol I like the CZ75 or EAA Witness in 9mm.
Dallas Jack

stormspotter
October 20, 2007, 06:57 PM
There is nothing wrong with a single action for home defense. They are simple to use, rugged, reliable and point naturally.

Find a Ruger that feels good in hand, either the regular Blackhawks or Vaqueros or the New Vaquero's that have come out and give them a try.

Autolycus
October 20, 2007, 08:25 PM
I would recommend a shotgun myself. In handguns I prefer a DAO or DA/SA so that there are no safeties or anything to remember.

NorCalAl
October 20, 2007, 09:37 PM
A lot of good ideas have been expressed here. Not sure if you said, but I didn't see how old nor how strong your pops is. I did see he wasn't terribly experienced.
I'd have to go with a 1911. You can pick up a decent example for the money you suggest. A 45 is really hard to beat. There's good arguments for revolvers (no safeties to worry about in the heat of battle, easy to use, etc), but there are, in my opinion, better arguments for automatics. The fact it has a safety is one. More shots is another.
I would hope that more than simply arming himself, that he'd spend the time to get to know his new gun and feel real comfortable with it. It's not like a lot of things in life where you can just buy a simple example and use it. I mean, you see some older folks getting simplified computers and cell phones and such. But those things aren't for self-defense and won't do damage if the folks don't REALLY learn how to use them.
I'm not suggesting that's the case here. But it does seem like some suggestions border on that. Like many have said, I'd certainly get down to a range for a while. Do some shooting at a place (if one's nearby) where you could rent a few guns and get a feel for what makes him feel comfortable. Depending on your dad, you might end up with a taser or pepper spray weapon. It's got to be more than just what will do the job - just about any handgun or tac shotgun will do that. It has to also be about the person using it.
Of course - I could be all wet. :D

gallo
October 21, 2007, 02:03 AM
I would suggest a 4" revolver such as Taurus, roughly $250; one Mossberg shotgun, approximately $170; and lastly, a .223 rifle, roughly another $250 - $300.

Definitely, take a gun handling class.

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