Scammed at the gun show


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tank mechanic
September 29, 2007, 01:40 AM
When I finally realized I was old enough to own a pistol, I got my behind down to a gunshow to buy my very first gun. I had three hundred dollars in my hand and my eyes were as big as saucers as I perused the various tables.

I eventually stumbled upon a gentleman who had a personal 1911 for sale for350 dollars. It was a essex slide on an ithaca reciever, (or maybe it was the other way around, it has been awhile) and he was eager to sell it. After consulting my compadres I decided I just had to have it. I borrowed 100 dollars from my friend and bought it from the seller, with fifty dollars left over for ammo and a cheap nylon holster.

The whole way home I was giddy with excitement. That is until the next day when I took it out shooting. A failure to feed, or a failure to extract every other round. It took forever to shoot two hundred rounds.

I took it to a smith who then charged me 250 dollars to fix my problems.

The gun worked fairly well up until 2000 rounds later when the barrel bushing flew off the gun while shooting it. I took it back to the same smith and he said the locking lugs were peening from the slide and the barrel. He said he the gun was officially dead and he could do nothing to help.

I was very upset to say the least. Especially when I realized I could have spent that six hundred dollars on a brand new pistol that I could still be shooting today.

I learned a costly lesson and have vowed to do my home work when it comes to buying guns.

If the gentleman who sold me the pistol reads this, please pm me so we can exchange some heated words.

If you have a similiar story of being hood winked, please share, it would make me feel better.:D

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Jackal
September 29, 2007, 02:01 AM
I hate to say this, but this is the exact reason I ask to do an inspection on any used handgun I get. If the seller wont let you take-down a tool-less takedown handgun, then run away.

MAX100
September 29, 2007, 02:19 AM
I had someone pay for a gun with a fake money order for gun I was selling out of the paper. I lost $350 that way.

Sometimes mistakes don't come cheap but those are the ones you usually don't repeat.

$700 total. Don't forget to pay your friend back his $100.




GC

buttrap
September 29, 2007, 04:23 AM
I think you need to find another smith.

El Hombre
September 29, 2007, 10:06 AM
I think you need to find another smith.

I agree.

What work was done that cost $250 that didn't address the locking lugs? New extractor, ejector, magazine, even a fitted barrel would have been less than $250 and should have solved 99% of your problems.

The gun worked fairly well up until 2000 rounds later when the barrel bushing flew off the gun while shooting it. I took it back to the same smith and he said the locking lugs were peening from the slide and the barrel. He said he the gun was officially dead and he could do nothing to help.


How about a new barrel bushing? The gun was shooting great untill that broke.

I bet this smith even gave you $20 for the junk gun for parts Right?

BlkHawk73
September 29, 2007, 10:45 AM
I hate to say this, but this is the exact reason I ask to do an inspection on any used handgun I get. If the seller wont let you take-down a tool-less takedown handgun, then run away.


Exactly right! Always inspect any used gun you're wanting to buy. Know what to look for. if not, you can't blame the seller 100%. It's that whole buyr beware thing all over again.

Texas Moon
September 29, 2007, 12:24 PM
Oooo where to start?!?!??!?!?!?!

Enfield No.1 Mk.III 1914 - All there, even the volley sight and mag cut-off.
Paid me moola and took it home. Ran a patch down the bore to clean it.
***????? Barrel had a BULGE in it!!!!! :what:
Now I know why the bore was left "dusty"!
:cuss::cuss::cuss::cuss:

Colt Python - reasonable deal on used one. Got it home and apart.
Insides were CAKED with rust. Had the incorrect hammer spring in it too! Which BROKE while I was fiddling with it! :what:
:cuss::cuss::cuss::cuss::cuss:

Italian made modern copy of an Enfield 3-band 1851 .58 muzzlelaoder.
Everything looked great on it. Clean outside. Bore looked good too(from what I could see).
Got it for a song. Got it home. Had a charge in the barrel!!!:what:
:eek::eek::eek::eek:

NEVER trust a gunshow gun.
Do your homework. Know what you're looking at and for.

wally
September 29, 2007, 12:46 PM
This is why I don't recommend buying used for your first gun, unless you can get to shoot it first to be sure it works correctly. The maker's warranty is worth a lot when you don't know what warning signs to look for in a used gun. But you always take a risk as some problems just don't show up untill you actually shoot the gun, but in my experience these have always ended up being magazine issues.

I agree something seems fishy with the "smith".

--wally.

Never No More
September 29, 2007, 01:23 PM
Before I knew the difference I bought 1500 rounds of the wrong ammo, it all got throw out.

Live and learn

Harley Quinn
September 29, 2007, 01:35 PM
Scammers are the rule and not the occasional, I have found at many a show.
To bad, really, many have had bad experience's. I believe that Glocks really helped the industry.
I can remember when every would-be gunsmith was working on the 1911's :rolleyes:

ArchAngelCD
September 29, 2007, 02:14 PM
Sorry I can't make you feel better by telling you I got beat but it hasn't happened. I try to look anything I buy used over very well before I buy and I make sure I get a business card from the salesman before we exchange money. I usually call the number from me cell phone to make sure there at least is a phone on the other end of the business card. Not fool-prof but better than nothing.

All that being said, the best protection is to look the gun over very well, do the standard checkouts for the type of gun you are buying and use your gut to tell you whether or not the seller is a thief or not.

Lonestar49
September 29, 2007, 02:25 PM
...

Seriously though, it never ceases to amaze me at how many do this for their living, basically, 24/7.. and I keep reminding myself, they give you a "out of sight guarantee" with any purchase. Good until you, or they, are out of sight.

Used stuff, guns, etc, usually means one of 2 things. Either it has given the owner grief, and they want to get rid of it. Or, they need the money.

That's the fine line one must deal with, IMHO, buying anything used, and sometimes the savings of money is good, and many times the savings of money is a money trap you just bought from a traveling gypsy, moving on, around this big country of ours, year round.


LS

alucard0822
September 29, 2007, 03:51 PM
I guess I have been lucky (rap of the knuckles on the brow:D). I have dealt with the automotive equivalent for years before I got deep into guns, Automobile, parts, and equipment auctions. I would have to look over a vehicle within a couple miutes or so, and decide on a maximum bid price that I was reasonably sure I could safely and reliably repair the car for, sell it and still make a profit. There are many things that you can look at, and a lot of things you can't, but often times judging the seller is more telling than judging the car. I always bring a little flashlight and a small electronic scale(reloading components), and a set of feeler gauges to look over anything of interest. You can usually tell if someone is on the level from the look on their face when you pull out the flashlight. I do remember people who have treated me right, have the good deals(not neccisarily the best price), and let others know.

tank mechanic
September 29, 2007, 06:39 PM
What work was done that cost $250 that didn't address the locking lugs?


I don't remember all that was done the fist time I took it to the gun smith. I do remember a big part of the bill was for a ramp and throat job.

I bet this smith even gave you $20 for the junk gun for parts Right?

No, I kept it and eventually gave it to my Dad, who uses it for a paper weight on his desk.

I hate to say this, but this is the exact reason I ask to do an inspection on any used handgun

I was just young and stupid. It was the first time I had even looked at a handgun. I was so happy that I could buy one that the logic and reason portion of my brain shut down.

Ever since that fateful experience I have mainly bought new guns and the few others that I bought used were scrutinized inside and out.

Sistema1927
September 29, 2007, 07:29 PM
I really don't know in which way the OP was scammed by the gun show seller.

Maybe by his "gunsmith", but certainly not by the seller. How about another slide and barrel assembly? The "firearm" part of the weapon should still be OK. It has been a long, long time since I purchased a 1911 lower for $350.

earplug
September 29, 2007, 11:41 PM
You really thought that you could buy A decent 1911 for under $400.00?

SigfanUSAF
September 29, 2007, 11:53 PM
Originally posted by Never No More
Before I knew the difference I bought 1500 rounds of the wrong ammo, it all got throw out.


You threw away 1500 rounds of ammo because you bought the wrong stuff:what:

That was a darn good reason to buy a new gun in that caliber


:neener:

2RCO
September 30, 2007, 12:01 AM
I think your smith scammed you!

I am guessing it was an Ithaca slide on an Essex Frame. Unless the frame is trashed you can replace every other piece on a 1911 for under $250 and that's using quality parts. I think you got a fair deal on the gun a year ago you could sell an Ithaca slide on ebay for $200 in decent shape.

tank mechanic
September 30, 2007, 01:03 AM
I felt scammed because the 1911 was a parts gun that I think the seller put together that morning to make a quick buck. And if he had shot the gun, he would have known it didn't work. But he assured me that the gun was a great shooter and would be a great first gun.

Earplug- I had no idea what a decent priced 1911 went for. I was a complete newb in the fire arms world at that time.

Elm Creek Smith
September 30, 2007, 01:38 AM
I was at a gun show, walking past a gun dealer's set-up when I heard one of the guys behind the table telling a couple looking at self-defense revolvers for the wife that Taurus made all of Smith & Wesson's revolvers and had since the Bangor Punta group owned both companies. I had to stop and listen for a moment to see if I heard what I thought I'd heard. When the moron behind the table repeated it, I asked him what Smith & Wesson built in those buildings in Springfield, MA, if Taurus was making their revolvers. I also asked him if he knew that Bangor Punta hadn't owned either company for decades. His mouth opened and closed a few times before hateful sounds emanated therefrom. I told the nice couple that there wasn't anything wrong with Taurus or Smith & Wesson revolvers but they weren't made in the same place.

The moron was still yelling at me as I walked away. I saw the couple at another dealer a while later buying a used Smith & Wesson Bodyguard Airweight with Pachmayr grips.

Not a scam, I guess.

ECS

MPanova
September 30, 2007, 07:14 AM
Not sure if this is a scam, maybe you guys can be the judge. At the last gun show I went to me and a buddy of mine were checking out prices on .50BMG rifles that we decided to go in halfs on, anyway we saw one guy selling one for $20,000 :what: I asked what was so special about it to justify the price tag and he said "This rifle was used in Iraq to kill a diplomat" or something to that effect. I just rolled my eyes and walked away.

Geno
September 30, 2007, 07:42 AM
In all seriousness this can happen with a NIB firearm. I got to the point that I developed a spreadsheet, simple check list, to assess all of the major components of a firearm prior to buying it. I take that checklist and I use it.

It has already been stated here that one should walk if the seller does not want you to break the firearm down and assess it. I suggest that you purchase a couple of inexpensive books about making repairs to your own firearms. There are sales rip-offs and repair rip-offs. Don't be one of the ripped-off.

jdomin
September 30, 2007, 09:31 AM
Looks like the smith ripped you off more than the seller, could be ammo brand!

alucard0822
September 30, 2007, 09:51 AM
The gun worked fairly well up until 2000 rounds later when the barrel bushing flew off the gun while shooting it. I took it back to the same smith and he said the locking lugs were peening from the slide and the barrel. He said he the gun was officially dead and he could do nothing to help.

I wonder if a longer barrel link was part of the original $250 job. A longer barrel link designed to "tighten things up" has ruined many a nice 1911 by peening the lugs (too long will jam the barrel into the slide with excessive force), and can eventually break the link mount clean off, break the slide stop, and as a result can cause the barrel to shift, bind and put the entire force of a round into the bushing, normally takes from a few to a couple thousand rounds for bad things to happen.

Clipper
September 30, 2007, 10:23 AM
So should he retreive the gun from his father and take it to another smith? Is it indeed salvageable, and it it worth it? It's not like the gun is gone forever, he still has access to it...

wally
September 30, 2007, 10:41 AM
You really thought that you could buy A decent 1911 for under $400.00? My RIA says you can do better than decent and get a factory Warranty.

Check out the Armscor/RIA forum over at forum.m1911.org where you can talk to factory reps, folks with great experiences out of the box and some with initial issues that were fixed under warranty.

--wally.

Majic
September 30, 2007, 11:10 AM
Find yourself a GOOD smith that understands the 1911. If the lugs are just peened they probably can be dressed and recut. Take the pistol apart and look for where the peening took place. Some barrels require cutting the lugs to function. It may need the barrel hood dressed. It sounds like at the most you may need the lugs in the slide dressed and a new barrel/bushing fitted.

MCgunner
September 30, 2007, 11:24 AM
This is why I cringe when someone posts about used M10s for 200 bucks on some auction site. :rolleyes: NEVER by sight unseen and ALWAYS thoroughly inspect before purchase. Let the buyer beware.

alucard0822
September 30, 2007, 11:30 AM
So should he retreive the gun from his father and take it to another smith? Is it indeed salvageable, and it it worth it? It's not like the gun is gone forever, he still has access to it...


This is about the same deal as an AR with a chewed up upper/bolt carrier, or a 10/22 with a busted trigger group. A 1911 is sort of the pistol equivalent, easy to build with plentiful parts by hundreds of manufacturers. But all in all, outside of a DIY project, or if you are not comfortable or enjoy gunsmithing in general, a new Rock Island 1911 just might be cheaper than a worst case complete rebuild, especially if someone might give you a couple bucks to take it off of your hands.

MisterPX
September 30, 2007, 04:27 PM
Being your first pistol, maybe ammo was an issue, or limp wristing. Something to consider..

Anyhow, what did you have your smith do? Tune it to be a racegun?;)

Gator
September 30, 2007, 06:19 PM
I'd say you overpaid for the gun in the first place (nothing most of us haven't done too:)), but the seller really didn't scam you. It is buyer beware all the way at gun shows. The "smith" on the other hand sounds either incompetent or dishonest. If it were my gun I'd get it fixed, if possible...Essex has had problems with soft frames, and chalk it up to a learning experience.

Cosmoline
September 30, 2007, 06:23 PM
who had a personal 1911 for sale for350 dollars

If the deal sounds too good, it probably is. This is one reason I favor buying used wheelguns. Easier to check function on those.

f4t9r
September 30, 2007, 06:33 PM
send that 1911 to me , I will not complain and have it up and running one way or another. I will even give you a couple dollars for it.

zeroskillz
October 1, 2007, 11:05 AM
It has already been stated here that one should walk if the seller does not want you to break the firearm down and assess it.

I'd only even consider letting someone do that on a used gun, and I'd break it down for them. Too many 'know-it-alls' that could really mess something up. (present company excepted, of course). There are jerks on both sides of the table, for sure.

Kestrel
October 1, 2007, 01:35 PM
Not sure if this is a scam, maybe you guys can be the judge. At the last gun show I went to me and a buddy of mine were checking out prices on .50BMG rifles that we decided to go in halfs on, anyway we saw one guy selling one for $20,000 I asked what was so special about it to justify the price tag and he said "This rifle was used in Iraq to kill a diplomat" or something to that effect. I just rolled my eyes and walked away.

That may be one of the funniest things I've heard said at a gun show or gun shop! It's funny - there are some great folks in the shooting industry, but the shows and shops seem to have a lot of the dregs in the industry. There are exceptions, but 99% of the time, you can't listen to anything they say. It's pitiful.

Maybe I should sell a Ruger MKII that was used to bring down a Scud missile in Gulf 1.... for $10,000

I could sell a S&W M10 .38 that was actually used to tame the shrew... for $6,500

Maybe I should sell a pocket knife that was used to peel an apple by the captain of the Titanic! $12,000?

What lunacy.

KMKeller
October 1, 2007, 02:35 PM
I think 'Tuner can probably give you some good advice.

PigPen
October 1, 2007, 02:46 PM
I have to say, the times that I have been skinned are minimal.

I have bought dozens of firearms through The Gun List, off the internet and at gun shows. I think in all, I have gotten a few guns that needed my local smith to file something or other but not anything serious.

Only twice, have I been seriously disappointed. Browning fixed both these problems for little charge.

All in all, the money that I saved buying Gun List guns or internet guns, etc. has way more than paid for fixing my blunders.

Gun show guns.....strangely, you just can't look at them too closely!

PigPen

rodregier
October 1, 2007, 06:57 PM
Good advice when shopping at a gun show is to bring along a friend who has experience with the model you're shopping for.

HiWayMan
October 1, 2007, 10:40 PM
Just remember that gunshows are where PITA guns go to find a new home. I send all my "problem children" to shows and leave them there with complete peace of mind. Buyer beware and all that jazz. The world of firearms trading is cruel like that.

Picknlittle
October 2, 2007, 08:35 AM
Gun shows are many things. They are a place for honest people to do business in heavier than off the street traffic. They are a place for the less than honorable to unload some junk. They are a place where an individual may find a buyer for a personal piece. They are also a place to meet, greet, network, meet people of similar interest and make long time friends.

I have a friend who has been going to shows for thirty years. He doesn't miss many. When he goes, he's there all day, spending much of his time socializing and visiting with other long time show goers. I'd recommend in the future, shake a few hands, meet a few people and make friends with some folks who are frequent attendees. They know who the scammers are. They know who is most likely to deal, and what their triggers are. Many of these guys are happy to assist a new attendee.

It also helps to learn which sellers are always at the show you're attending.

Better luck next time. The good news is that most sellers are on the up and up, and you have already uncovered one to stay away from.

novaDAK
November 24, 2007, 06:20 AM
Yeah I got screwed at the last gun show here...not as bad though...

I just bought a stainless 15rd mag for one of my 9mms but when I tried it out at home it wouldn't lock the slide back or drop free. So after I got over the feeling of being screwed, I just took one of my 10 round ban-era mags that I have never used (came with a few guns I bought over the past year) and just swapped out the followers. Problem fixed! :)
What the problem was is that the aftermarket follower didn't have the tab sticking far enough out to push the slide stop up, which in turn didn't put any spring tension on the mag while ejecting. Factory follower swapped in, problem solved :)

jeepmor
November 24, 2007, 08:27 AM
Not all used car salesmen sell cars.....

Hokkmike
November 24, 2007, 08:47 AM
I agree with the sentiment that the first gun should be new. You've got that warranty to give you peace of mind. Guns are a lot like running shoes, you don't know how good they are going to be until you have gone a few miles. But at least if there is a problem with structural integrity you can do something about it.

Z71
November 24, 2007, 09:53 AM
Just as easy to buy a turkey as it is to buy a good weapon. You just reach for your wallet!

I've been pretty fortunate, because with the number of guns I've bought have discovered most to be good servicable guns.

Not that I have not bought Turkeys! Just because a gun is brandnew is not a sign it's good. Also just because a gun looks beat-to-he11 it may be the best shooter you can find.

harmonic
November 24, 2007, 10:06 AM
You really thought that you could buy A decent 1911 for under $400.00?


The OP doesn't give the date of purchase, and his narrative is past tense, so indeed he could have been purchasing a decent 1911 for under $400.

My first 1911 was a 97% Colt National Match I bought from an acquaintence for $200 (circa 1975). I sold it (like the stupid person I was back then) for $200.

My first new 1911 was a Colt Mk 4/Series 70 for $234 from M&M Sporting Goods in Murray, KY. (I was a Murray State; circa 1978).

Just Jim
November 24, 2007, 11:06 AM
Most gun show sellers live by a couple of creeds. First "the gun isn't worth that much till I own it". Second "we will let the next owner worry about if the gun works or not". The world is buyer beware to all involved.

jj

MCgunner
November 24, 2007, 11:30 AM
I got rid of two 1911s (well, one got stolen) 20 years ago. I have owned a P90 about 16 years now and I've never had to "lift the hood." It always works, it's more rugged, it's more accurate, it's more reliable, it never jams, it has no bushing to fly off, it's simpler and better in design. I don't do 1911s anymore. There are Rugers, CZs, Sigs, etc out there if I want another auto. I don't need no stinkin' 1911, been there, done that, got sucked in by the hype and learned my lesson. Frankly, I prefer revolvers to autos anyway.

plexreticle
November 24, 2007, 11:34 AM
I've been burned a few times and I've had deals of a lifetime.

Chalk it up as a lesson. Don't try to burn anybody like that and karma will reward you later.

It all evens out.

Vonderek
November 24, 2007, 12:39 PM
How many times have you read on a forum "the gun never ran right or was a POS so I sold/traded it"? Where do you think these lemons end up? It's like a bad penny.
Caveat Emptor.

jakeswensonmt
November 24, 2007, 01:54 PM
How many times have you read on a forum "the gun never ran right or was a POS so I sold/traded it"?

That's where my PITA's have gone.
I told the guy who sold them what the actual problems were.
Think he told the customers that same info? Yeah, right.

He doesn't lose any sleep over it, he's that kind of guy, which I think is real typical for a used gun/car salesman.

P.S. Apologies for the above insult to all you honest used stuff salesman .

Koos Custodiet
November 24, 2007, 02:53 PM
P.S. Apologies for the above insult to all you honest used stuff salesman .

Both of us? :-)

Hey, a friend who emigrated to your part of the world sold his 1911 "Property of US Government" to me for... let's say 5 flats of beer equivalent. Work it out yourself. Whatever it costs you to not drink beer for two months or so :-)

I think it was a bargain.

He says he's not allowed to re-import it, or he's heard something to that effect, or something. Me, I don't care :-)

Dhelynn
November 25, 2007, 06:57 AM
In your opinions, it's pretty chancy, buying a used gun online then? I'm looking at a used Bersa .380 in Mn for a low price... You're thinking I should just buy new, to avoid taking chances?

wideym
November 25, 2007, 07:17 AM
The funny thing for me it when I sell a problem gun at a gun show I always tell them what the problems are, and they usually sell faster that way.

Happened with a Keltec .380 that had failure to feed problems and an Olympic Car15 that would shoot bursts at odd times even though it had semi only parts.

Dravur
November 25, 2007, 10:08 AM
I buy and sell alot of guns and am a fixture at the Tanner show in Denver. Sometimes I buy a gun for pure spec purposes. I picked up a Glock 31 the other day, as an example. It had a brand new .40 barrell with it as well and a few mags. It didnt trip my trigger for my collection, but the price was fantastic for an almost new gun.

Did i test fire it to make sure it worked and I got the greatest firing gun on the planet? Nope. I don't even have any .357 sig ammo. I placed it on the table, and built in a nice profit. I sold it the same day to a person who thought my deal was fair. and it was.

There is no way in heck I could test fire or really put through the paces every gun I acquire. I would be at the range every day and would be so sick of shooting, I would give it all up. Some guns I buy are mib or nib and I simply don't want to shoot them for fear of dropping value for the ones I am planning on reselling.

Now, the one thing I do is tell the customer about the flaws in a gun. I will point them out. I also know what I'm doing for the most part when it comes to buying guns. I know what guns I know and if something odd walks up to the table, I find someone who knows it. I had never seen a Steyr GB before, but I ended up trading a Glock 22 that I had $350 into. I think that worked out well.

joab
November 25, 2007, 10:24 AM
You really thought that you could buy A decent 1911 for under $400.00?In the time frame the OP is talking about it was quite common
It can still be done fairly easily

Within the last few months I sold three Norincos for $350 and two Sistemas for $250 and one for $300

I have also bought a nickle Norinco for $380 and another Sistema for $250

Just saw an Essex framed 1911 for $375 at the last show I went to

I occasionally sell at shows
I go out of my way top let the buyer know any and all deficiencies in the gun
I don't want him writing bad things about me years later
But I also have that out of sight warranty

19-3Ben
November 25, 2007, 12:41 PM
I ended up buying a sporterized (decently, but I wouldn't say "well") Mosin Nagant with a decent but not fantastic bore for $95 about 2.5 years ago.
it works, and works fairly well. But a big rip off given that perfectly original condition ones cost less than that. Didn't know that. It was my first one. Luckily though, a relatively inexpensive mistake.

tank mechanic
November 25, 2007, 12:50 PM
I bought the gun in the summer of 2000.


Quote:
You really thought that you could buy A decent 1911 for under $400.00?

I thought this quote was funny too. The highroad always has some one selling a 1911 for around 400 dollars. They usaully do not have names like Ed Brown or Nighthawk any where on them but they are decent pistols.
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=307523&highlight=1911+%24400

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=264400&highlight=%24400+1911

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=261075&highlight=%24400+1911

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=260365&highlight=%24400+1911

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=96397&highlight=%24400+1911

aufevermike
November 25, 2007, 07:28 PM
I once bought a Colt Mustang for $325 at a gun show. I was so excited to own a Colt. Bought some 380 and proceded to fire away.............bang, bang, stovepipe. Cleared the weapon inserted new mag ful..... bang, stovepipe......cleared bang, bang, stovepipe. I said to myself and I quote "***" Had it inpected. Guy told me the slide was worn out and for $300 hecould get me a new one. At the next Gunshow I walked up to the table of the guy who sold it to me and told him I wanted to trade this Mustange in on your new Defender. He gave me $375 for it and I gave him$175 more to cover his new price on the Colt Defender............. Don't get mad, get even!!!!!!!!!

jakeswensonmt
November 25, 2007, 10:34 PM
wideym: and an Olympic Car15 that would shoot bursts at odd times even though it had semi only parts.

I know guys (and a girl) who would pay extra for that.

22-rimfire
November 25, 2007, 10:53 PM
There are no guarantees when you buy a gun at a gunshow. It may be a great gun or it may be a problem gun. I have a number of Colt revolvers that I can not say if they work or not as I have not shot them nor do I intend to. Other than to check they aren't loaded, they pretty much don't get handled. Problem semi-auto pistols or rifles are one of the reasons I often suggest that someone new to guns not buy a used gun unless they know the owner and can trust what they say. If I buy a semi-auto and it does not work right, it gets sold. Someone else can figure out what is causing the problem. I'm not going to loose any sleep over it. They are often just another gun.

Okiecruffler
November 25, 2007, 11:31 PM
I buy alot of guns at shows that have a problem. I wish the folks would just be up front about the problem so I could either tell them how to fix it, or know what parts to order when I get home. I've lost count of how many Marlin mod60's I've bought for a song when the only thing wrong with them was they needed a good cleaning/degreasing. Spring gets weak, you start getting misfires, and you try to dump it at the gunshow. Easy fixes usually, I'll take that gamble. Been thinking of buying a table just so I could advertise "will buy your crumby broken gun."

goon
November 25, 2007, 11:50 PM
Actually, most of the guns I buy anymore have something wrong with them.
And the sad thing is that most of them are new and the problems that they have when I get them rarely get fixed.
The current one is a SIG P-226 CPO. It is failing to eject loaded rounds. I really am a magnet for the guns with the strangest and apparently most incurable problems. This one is on its way back to SIG a second time as we speak to get this fixed - they didn't fix it the first time they had it back, they just tweeked it until they thought they fixed it.

Really, I can't contribute any "gunshow" stories to this thread.
But I could add a half dozen in the past two years about the new guns I have had that didn't work right.
It sickens me and it kinda makes shooting not be fun anymore.
But I guess that's a different discussion.

tinygnat219
November 26, 2007, 10:13 AM
Shoot,

You can imagine how small the world can be! I was given a Kel-Tec P40 by a friend because he was fed up with the gun. Being as beggars can't be choosers, I accepted his generous offer.:D

I can see why he wanted to get rid of it. Uncomfortable trigger, hellacious recoil, magazines wouldn't feed correctly, etc.

Now, after 6 months of trying to get it to work, I decided to put it up for a consignment sale, 250 bucks, with a list of all the known issues and problems. My dealer thought I was nuts, and so did I when it didn't sell for 3 months. One day, I got a phone call from the dealer who said that the gun had sold, to a Kel-Tec collector of all people (didn't know they existed). The dealer told me the buyer was astonished at the list of "issues" and then stated it was because I didn't know how to fire the gun (common viewpoint of KT P-40 owners). Whatever, I thought to myself, as long as the check clears. Well, low and behold, at a slow gunshow the following month, I ran into this guy who worked at booth next to me. He was Open Carrying his P-40, and I asked how he liked it. Said it was the best compact .40 S&W he had ever owned, that he had also bought it for a song, and then started in about how odd it was that the previous owner listed the faults and issues of the gun. He swore that he had no such issues with it. Thinking Deja Vu, I asked him what the SN started with. He pulled it out and let me look at it. Lo and behold, this was the SAME gun I had put on consignment. Seeing the look on my face, he asked what was up. I told him this used to be my P-40. We both had a laugh, and he stated that he was very happy with the gun and appreciated the honesty with the "list" that I had given, and that he hadn't experienced any of the problems I had. I ended up buying an older Smith M&P revolver off of him at that show and have been happy ever since.

Seriously, I have found that it pays dividends to be honest about the used guns that you are selling. List known issues, etc, or mention them. I have found that most people don't really care, or say "I can fix that". I also state that the price reflects the issues and won't really dicker with them. Sometimes it gets a sale, sometimes it doesn't.

logical
November 27, 2007, 12:49 PM
..................... But he assured me that the gun was a great shooter and would be a great first gun
You sorta left that little tidbit out of the original post.

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