squirrel hunting


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jay43
October 3, 2007, 05:05 PM
Why? i'm from massachusetts and they are everywhere more or less a nuisence, almost like a mouse in the house. where i'm from when i think hunting i think deer bear turkey etc, not to belittle or make fun of anyone i'm just curious, due to an incident at my range last week, what do you do with squirrel after you shoot them?

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Red Tornado
October 3, 2007, 05:08 PM
If they're cooked right, they're delicious.

308win
October 3, 2007, 05:11 PM
Fry em and eat em. Gravy and fried potatos, sliced tomatos.

Ash
October 3, 2007, 05:16 PM
Skin and gut them, remove the head and claws, and fry them like fish. Eat the meat from the bones. They really are quite tasty. Some folks get a bit squiemish from looking at the fried squirrel, but once you get past that (nobody has a problem with a whole baked chicken or eating meat from pork ribs), squirrel is a light, tender meat.

Ash

rcmodel
October 3, 2007, 05:18 PM
Squirrel in Gravy:
*Skin & clean & place the squirrel inside a tightly closed zip-lock bag.
*Marinate in the refrigerator over-night in 1 qt. Black-Jack Daniels.
*The next day, microwave 5 seconds on low, and remove the zip-lock bag & squirrel.
*Throw the bagged squirrel away.
*Drink the gravy!

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

obxned
October 3, 2007, 05:39 PM
The only critters I can think of that have no dinner-potential are skunk and porcupine (tastes like Pine-Sol). Squirrel is very tasty, but not much meat on one. Better plan on 2 per person, or three if hungry.

spencerhut
October 3, 2007, 05:50 PM
You guys must have some pretty big squirrels where you live. The ones where I live are left where I shoot them for the buzzards. Rats with tails. :barf:

luckytexan
October 3, 2007, 05:52 PM
I grew up hunting squirrels with my dad in the Sam Houston Nat'l Forest in East Texas. Once grown, I married a pretty Canadian girl (18 yrs ago this month!). When I'd tell my in-laws from the Great White North that we eat squirrels in Texas, they'd always be shocked, asking, "Is there any meat on them?"

I'd remind them that we didn't have ground squirrels in East Texas; fox and grey squirrels get almost as large as a rabbit. They would shake their heads and mumble about things being bigger in Texas.

Then one fall I was up in Banff and saw a local tree squirrel.... Not any bigger than a ground squirrel, only with a bushy tail almost twice it's body size. Then I realized why the northerners were surprised squirrels had any meat on them!

mp510
October 3, 2007, 05:55 PM
Squirrels make great stew.

jerkface11
October 3, 2007, 06:05 PM
Clean them roll them in flour and fry them. Make flour gravy in the pan you cooked them in. Serve with biscuits and mashed potatoes. There's also squirrel potpie. As for them being small quail are small too and people eat them. You just need several of them to make a meal.

Ash
October 3, 2007, 06:05 PM
And, biologically, they are not as close to Rats and mice as they are to beavers. There's quite a bit of difference between them as critters. Also, squirrels are not carrion, their diets are much cleaner than vermin.

Ash

Slugless
October 3, 2007, 06:13 PM
If they're vermin, do whatever you want.

If you hunt them for sport you should eat them. Any animal hunted for sport should be eaten, it's one of the golden rules.

By vermin, I mean overpopulated, living in your attic, damaging trees, really irritating behavior. Not the purely biological definition.

jerkface11
October 3, 2007, 06:32 PM
Even if they are being a nuisance you should still eat them.

Ash
October 3, 2007, 06:37 PM
Cause they taste good. And if you are gonna kill them anyway, might as well make a meal and save some dough!

Ash

yesit'sloaded
October 3, 2007, 06:45 PM
According to Ted Nugent, bowhunting squirrels is one of the most challenging ways of hunting there is.

Ash
October 3, 2007, 06:47 PM
Heh, heh, heh. Gotta be good to do that!

Ash

achildofthesky
October 3, 2007, 07:09 PM
Bobcat. We both like them. Puddin gets them raw and I like roasted..


Patty

jpwilly
October 3, 2007, 09:23 PM
Squirrel is good but I got tired of all the prep.

gbran
October 3, 2007, 09:31 PM
I sure hope yer talkin about tree squirrels, not ground squirrels.
Yeah, I've hunted and eaten them for years. Fry the younger ones, stew or bake the old ones.

MCgunner
October 3, 2007, 09:38 PM
Fried squirrel, squirrel stew, squirrel dumplings, smothered squirrel, squirrel gumbo, at the risk of sounding like Forest's buddy, Bubba.

I hit the woods about every day I could from about 9 years old with my .22. I hunted squirrel with my benjamin pellet rifle before that. I still greatly enjoy squirrel hunting. I do it with a Contender pistol a lot now. My mom raised me on squirrel. Her squirrel dumplin's were out of this world!!!! Fried squirrel is just as good as fried cotton tail and down here in Texas, the fox squirrels are danged near as big! The cat squirrels (aka grey) are smaller.

You never heard of Daniel Boone? Back in his day, they had .31 caliber "squirrel rifles". In order to preserve the meat they'd "bark" the squirrel, shoot just under his head and the bark flying off the tree would stun the squirrel. No bullet hole. :D They were serious about their hunting back then.

It's hard for me to believe anyone never heard of squirrel hunting or eating squirrel, frankly. It's been an American tradition since the Cumberland Gap was discovered, probably before that.

I like to call 'em "tree rats", myself. :D

hank327
October 3, 2007, 09:58 PM
Squirrel & dumplings is very tasty. Fried squirrel tastes good but can be VERY tough so your teeth had better be in good shape. Cooking the meat in a crock pot in preparation to make squirrel & dumplings really does a great job tenderizing the squirrel.

In Texas we have fox squirrels and grey aka "cat" squirrels. The little cat squirrels are found mainly in East Texas and they are a tough target. They are nervous little buggers and they rarely sit still for long. You will really hone your rifle marksmanship hunting these guys. Fox squirrels are larger and much more sedate. If you are used to hunting cat squirres, the foxes are pretty easy.

I think squirrel hunting is where American frontiersmen learned the skills that earned them their reputation for being expert marksmen.

Logan5
October 3, 2007, 10:09 PM
Something about stewing with tomatoes tenderizes the meat. Up here in the land of little Squirrels, we generally try to get a few and stew them. They're kind of tiny, lean little suckers, and results are poor if you try to just roll in flour and fry. If you've got those cat sized Texas squirrels (or, say, D.C. squirrels, hand fed on tourist popcorn) your approach should probably be different.

MT GUNNY
October 3, 2007, 10:26 PM
Ive always seen on TV some guy sneaking throught the woods trying to find them, If you want to go on the squirrel hunt of a lifetime?? Call me They come down every third tree just to chirp at you!!!
Just a few weeks ago I called in two while coyote hunting Go Figure!!

Slugless
October 3, 2007, 10:37 PM
1953 Joy of Cooking. Grandma's cookbook, she took lots of squirrel.

Modern day hunters, care to comment on the skinning technique?

Ladies, check out those boots!

Cookbook gives a few recipes, mostly targeted towards rabbit. She says you can cook them like, yeah you got it....heck, I don't even need to say the word!

Ash
October 4, 2007, 12:05 AM
That technique works for me.

Ash

Deer Hunter
October 4, 2007, 12:50 AM
What? No squirrel jerky recipes?

U.S.SFC_RET
October 4, 2007, 05:34 AM
Squirrels are nothing but a menace in my neighborhood. They have learned to stay clear of all traps. If they even get close enough in my back yard they are toast. A man is not supposed to deep six 65 squirrels inside of 14 months. I had a neighbor just move in next to me telling me just how much he loves squirrels ever since the sixth grade. He complained to me that he has only seen one since moving in. :neener:. When I moved in the guy who had this house was feeding these tree rats. Never upset the balance of mother nature.
Those tree rats will get into your attic, chew wiring in your car. Their teeth continue to grow because they are a rodent.
I balanced them out now but I am on the verge of paying out a bounty.

Threejs
October 4, 2007, 07:59 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xy4i13HIjA
How to skin a squirrel (as posted before, but in live action)

308win
October 4, 2007, 08:33 AM
Try brining the squirrel in a mixture of salt water, vinegar, a little sugar and some pepper corns. This will moisten the meat, tenderize it slightly, and take some of the gaminess out of the older boars. Actually, brining works on any meat that tends to be dry.

hank327
October 4, 2007, 11:16 AM
If you've got those cat sized Texas squirrels (or, say, D.C. squirrels, hand fed on tourist popcorn) your approach should probably be different.

Our little grey "cat" squirrels are no where near cat sized. Unless you're talking about undernurished 4 month old kittens. :) I'm not sure why they are called "cat" squirrels but they are little scrawny things that have their hides superglued to their bodies and they are tougher than old boot leather when fried.

The fox squirrels are much larger (still considerably smaller than a cat) but just as tough to chew if fried.

MCgunner
October 4, 2007, 11:40 AM
When I moved in the guy who had this house was feeding these tree rats. Never upset the balance of mother nature.

I'd bait 'em, pick 'em off through a window with an accurate air rifle ands stock my freezer! :D

"cat" squirrels but they are little scrawny things that have their hides superglued to their bodies and they are tougher than old boot leather when fried.

Young ones fry up tender, though fox (red) squirrel have more meat on 'em. Older ones become stew or get smothered (with gravy) or put in dumplings. I can't make dumplin's like mom used to, so I cheat and use cheap biscuit dough. :D And, if you clean 'em before they cool off, you don't have to strain skinnin' 'em. Just bring along some plastic baggies for the meat. If not, cut the tail, skin up the hind legs, stand on the tail and pull on the feet. It'll come off fine. If you're too lazy for THAT, just go to the store and buy some meat. LOL!

Kimber1911_06238
October 4, 2007, 12:13 PM
new brunswick stew...mmmmm

Ash
October 4, 2007, 12:26 PM
Just don't eat the brains.

I have been told is is somewhat a cultural thing in the Carolinas to eat squirrel brains (like eating pork brains, I suppose). What ever you do, don't do that. In fact, avoid the spinal chord, too. The reason is that it is possible to get Mad Squirrel Disease. No cases have been reported that I know of, but it is possible all the same. Besides being a pretty disgusting thing to do, I can't imagine any good reason to eat it.

Ash

MCgunner
October 4, 2007, 12:58 PM
I have been told is is somewhat a cultural thing in the Carolinas to eat squirrel brains (like eating pork brains, I suppose).

I've heard that about Arkansas. Seems they think it'll improve their IQs and math scores on tests and such.:neener:

SaMx
October 4, 2007, 01:28 PM
oh, that's the tailbone. I thought it was the squirrel's butt, and couldn't stop giggling.
(comment directed at Joy of Cooking scan on previous page)

I'm not a hunter but I do like wild game. I have no interest in eating squirrel though, they're just too close to rats for me.

atblis
October 4, 2007, 01:32 PM
Squirrel gravy with biscuits and mashed taters. :)
Brunswick stew. Personal favorite.

The meat isn't gamier than any other wild game. If you had squirrel and it tasted awful, That person doesn't know how to care for and prepare their game. There's no special soaking or marinating required with squirrels. That's for people who do something wrong with the skinning, gutting, etc.

Fun to hunt.
Basically no limit.
Very Tasty (good lean meat)
What's not to like?

Cook them for a few hours covered, simmering in broth (I use canned chicken). The meat will fall of the bone.

There's a correct way to clean them. No need to field dress, just don't walk around all day with them. A few hours is fine. Make sure you remove the little glands under the armpits.

Here's my squirrel rig. Tempted to get a 17 HM2 barrel for it.
http://filebox.vt.edu/users/atblis/7722VBZ.JPG

MCgunner
October 4, 2007, 04:24 PM
Looks like a cheater rifle. :D Handguns are more fun. I have an old Remington 512X .22 bolt that's a tack driver, have been hunting with it since I got it for my 9th birth day, but not much anymore. I like handgunning 'em when I get the chance to do it.

.45Guy
October 4, 2007, 04:43 PM
Parboil the suckers in beer, then slather with your BBQ sauce of choice. Toss whole on the grill and enjoy!
And of course the gratuitous "tree demon" slayer pic:
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g27/aguy123/misc002.jpg

KFDiesel
October 5, 2007, 06:43 AM
I cut off their heads, cut offf their feet,hands above the joint. split em open and gut em. Then slit the skin down the back. work your finger down the side and under neath on each side. then just hold him like that (kinda hooked around his midsection and pull off the skin toward his head and feet. Hope this was clear. Then I quarter them and bread and fry if theyre not too old. Make a little gravy with the drippins and oh boy lets eat!

KFDiesel
October 5, 2007, 06:51 AM
I cut off their heads, cut offf their feet,hands above the joint. split em open and gut em. Then slit the skin down the back. work your finger down the side and under neath on each side. then just hold him like that (kinda hooked around his midsection and pull off the skin toward his head and feet. Hope this was clear. Then I quarter them and bread and fry if theyre not too old. Make a little gravy with the drippins and oh boy lets eat! Sorry posted twice couldnt delete.

308win
October 5, 2007, 09:40 AM
.45guy

What type of rifle is the top one in the picture. I looks just like an old one I had around that I am fixing up.

.45Guy
October 5, 2007, 03:37 PM
Glenfield 25

doc2rn
October 5, 2007, 04:56 PM
Squirrel Stew is the only way to go!

MrBorland
October 5, 2007, 05:19 PM
Glenfield 25

I knew it! I just re-finished the stock on mine with tung oil and it's a dead ringer. Surpisingly nice wood under that brown "stain". More like paint, really. Mine's minute-of-barn accurate, though. Hope yours is better. It's a project.

.45Guy
October 5, 2007, 06:35 PM
Yes sir, mine is a keeper. Aside from the fact it was my father's first anniversary present. She has never done me wrong.

jaysouth
October 5, 2007, 07:44 PM
I gather 6-8 dressed whole squirrels and rub them with olive oil and place them on a bed of mirapoux(mix of diced carrots, onions and celery) and place in a 500 degree oven for about 15 min. Then I add a bottle of red wine and a quart of chicken stock. Place bouquet garni (fresh herbs of your choice tied in cheesecloth) in the pan. Tightly cover with aluminum foil and cook in 300 degree oven for 3 hours.

Drain the liquid and reduce until it coats the back of a spoon. Serve the braised squirrels over rice or buttered noodles and nap with reduced sauce.

A nice dry Merlot served slightly chilled makes a good wine to pair with.

.45Guy
October 5, 2007, 07:55 PM
I hope you don't mind, but I'm saving that recipe for later use Jay!:D

chemist308
October 5, 2007, 09:31 PM
According to Ted Nugent, bowhunting squirrels is one of the most challenging ways of hunting there is.
Destroy or loose a $6+ arrow on an animal I need three or four of to make one meal?! They're almost not worth the shotgun shell I use. I do prefer 22 for them in areas where stray bullets making it to town are never an issue--much more economical that way.

That said, if deer tasted like squirrel they'd be nearly extinct.

308win
October 7, 2007, 10:13 AM
Jaysouth

You should contact the food channel about your own show.

doubleg
October 7, 2007, 10:31 AM
Do your best to ignore the semi auto rifle, and the gut shot:banghead:. While walking through the woods I spotted me a fat one. I pulled the rifle up to my shoulder, aimed, and of course I missed :rolleyes:. So he ran up the tree about three more feet and hid behind a branch. I had no choice but lean the rifle up against my hip and unload the magazine in his general direction, and I HIT HIM! True story, I don't know who was more surprised me or the squirrel.

http://i187.photobucket.com/albums/x318/dg14008/0710071809.jpg

jay43
October 7, 2007, 01:22 PM
what calibor,s are you all using? is 223 to big

308win
October 7, 2007, 01:31 PM
.223 is way plenty of gun. 40gr loaded hot would be ok if you can make head shots.

cpttango30
October 7, 2007, 01:37 PM
We shoot ground squirrels in CA can't eat them. plus there was never much left after taking a 52gr HP at 3800 fps out of my Swift.

havanatrader
October 7, 2007, 03:13 PM
Squirrel Brunswick stew is much better than the standard chicken recipe.

atblis
October 7, 2007, 03:33 PM
Squirrel Brunswick stew is much better than the standard chicken recipe.
Absofreakinglutely it's better. The squirrel adds an almost indescribable richer savory flavor.

Ed
October 7, 2007, 09:38 PM
I know people that eat the brains. None of them has contracted any disease.

Ash
October 8, 2007, 08:58 AM
I believe you. The story is really more for the Carolinas where evidenlty it isn't very safe.

What part of Mississippi are you (north, central, south?)

Ash

308win
October 8, 2007, 09:32 AM
A few years ago the practice of eating squirrel brains and contacting some fatal disease by Kentucky residents made the national news for a couple of days - Brittany hadn't made it big yet.

Ash
October 8, 2007, 10:02 AM
Yeah, it was a version of Mad Cow Disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob. It is caused by a bizarre, rogue protein that causes other proteins to become distorted merely by contact. It causes literal holes to develop in the victim's brain. The trouble is, because it is a protein and not technically alive, it cannot be cooked to death. In other words, because I like a well-done steak, I'll never, ever get e-coli. However, if that cow had mad-cow disease, you could char that sucker until it was ashes and still get the disease. Also because of that, it is not curable. There is neither a defense against getting it (other than not eating certain foods) nor is there a cure or treatment once you have it.

It is also known to occur in cannibalistic societies.

Ash

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