Missouri "Guns and kids _ a dangerous mix" (not as bad as it sounds)


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cuchulainn
July 11, 2003, 11:27 AM
All in all, a pretty good article.

from the Examiner (Independence/Blue Springs)

http://www.examiner.net/stories/071003/new_071003005.shtmlStory last updated at 3:27 p.m. Thursday, July 10, 2003

Guns and kids _ a dangerous mix
By Kelly Evenson
The Examiner

Amy Crump learned an important lessen this week at Cordill-Mason Elementary School.

The fifth grader, along with the rest of the summer school students, were taught gun safety and what not to do if they ever come across a gun.

"I learned not to touch a gun if an adult is not around," she said. "I thought everything he said was very educational."

Phil Philips, outdoor skills supervisor for the Missouri Conservation Department, presented several lessens to students about gun safety. He discussed the parts of the gun, how to carry a gun and safety rules.

"Always assume each and every gun you see out there is loaded," he said. "Most gun accidents involving kids take place in the summer because kids are curious. You can't tell by looking at a gun that it is loaded."

Philips also showed a video, "The Last Shot," which discussed information about safety and what happens if the rules are not followed. The story depicts two teenagers who go out by themselves, against a parent's wishes, for target practice. Because neither one of them was taught how to handle the gun properly, one of the teenagers was accidentally shot and later died from his injuries.

"I thought the video taught a very important lessen," Paul Menking, fifth grader, said. "You are not supposed to go out with a gun without supervision."

Philips said the number one rule when handling a gun is to point the muzzle in a safe direction. He said to never point the gun at anyone or anything that is not the intended target.

"If someone gets hurt, people blame the gun, but that's not correct. The person with the gun should also blame themselves," he said. "Does the gun have a brain? No. If it is picked up, where does its brain come from? It comes from the person who is holding the gun."

Philips also stressed that if a child were to come across a gun on the playground , at home or anywhere, that they are to "Stop, don't touch, leave the area and tell an adult."

"It is not your job to pick up the gun," he said. "If your mom is not at home, go to your room and leave it alone. You don't know if that gun is loaded."

Kelly Evenson can be reached at kevenson@examiner.net or at (816) 229-9161, Ext. 24.

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Standing Wolf
July 11, 2003, 09:28 PM
Most gun accidents involving kids take place in the summer because kids are curious

Ice cubes float because the moon revolves around the earth.

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