LeMat 2007


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cwmcgu2
October 9, 2007, 02:47 AM
Would a modern adaptation of the LeMat revolver be feasable or legal. I envision a modern LeMat utilizing a top-break system like the S&W Schofield. This would allow loading access to both the revolving pistol chambers and the central shot barrel. With the 9-shot cylinder chambered in .357 and the shot barrel chambered for 20 guage it would be a fearsome weapon. I would also prefer the weapon to be single action for more simplistic operation and due to the already neccesity of some sort of hammer mechanism to allow the switch of firing barrel.

However, I wonder if the short shot barrel would be legal. I know the Taurus Judge allows the use of .410, but I am unclear as to whether a larger shot shell would be possible for a pistol. Even if it required a $200 dollar tax stamp a modern variant as described above would be worth it to me.

Anyway I was just hoping yall would chime in on the possibility of my dream gun from merely a functional and legal standpoint, I know already it is a far-fetched idea with regard to its commercial possibility.

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cwmcgu2
October 9, 2007, 03:27 AM
Oops this should probably be better in the Revolver section, mods please move if neccessary.

buttrap
October 9, 2007, 03:32 AM
Easy cure on the .410 deal is just go with a .45 colt .410 combo rifled barrel. But I would think by the time you beefed the thing up to hack .357 it would be as convient as a ram on a ram on a Ageis cruiser.

cwmcgu2
October 9, 2007, 03:42 AM
What about a smaller version designed for .38 special and .410 for the second barrel? I know the Judge is a more efficient modern design, but I want to stick with the basic design of a cylinder revolving around a second shot-barrel.

Dan Forrester
October 9, 2007, 06:29 AM
As you describe the weapon it would fall into the AOW category and only be a $5 tax instead of $200. I wish companies like Taurus would offer their .410 revolvers in an NFA AOW smoothbore configuration.

Dan

hnk45acp
October 9, 2007, 03:13 PM
A top break revolver would probably not be strong enough to handle .357 mag loads

Deer Hunter
October 9, 2007, 03:23 PM
The russians made a top-break .357 that was half polymer. It can be done no problem.

Dan Forrester
October 9, 2007, 06:26 PM
Do a regular swing out cylinder 6 shot .44mag for added strength. The shotgun would be chambered for 20ga and would operate like a mini M203. It would transfer for a $5 stamp.

Dan

JesseL
October 9, 2007, 07:15 PM
Making a top break revolver that fires from the bottom of the cylinder (ala the Mateba) would help to improve the strength of the action as well. The force geometry would be comparable to what you see in break-action rifles and no one complains about their strength.

David S
October 9, 2007, 07:46 PM
Ive been thinking about this for a while too....
seeing Smiths 8 shot revolvers make it seem really possible.... i dont see why someone couldnt make it.
itd be pretty big like the old lemats, and therefore pretty useless in real life id think, but heckava lotta fun to shoot at the range

cwmcgu2
October 9, 2007, 07:58 PM
Ok if the top-break isn't strong enough what about a swing out cylinder like mentioned above. However in the case of this hypothetical gun, the second barrel swings out with the cylinder. I imagine this would require a pretty complicated mechanism to lock the cylinder and barrel in place. Is this doable? Since the second barrel is for close up shot only any accuracy problems from the swing out barrel would be of little importance.

Ed Ames
October 9, 2007, 08:22 PM
Hey, has anyone done any research on how different types of rifling affect shot pattern compared to straight rifling? I'm thinking specifically of polygonal rifling. Does it grab the shot cup and spin it just like standard rifling or does the slippery plastic get a pass from the edgeless polygonal rifling?

As I understand it, the rifling in the Taurus .410/45LC causes a significant donut pattern. Would polygonal rifling have the same level of impact on the pattern?

Dan Forrester
October 10, 2007, 01:40 AM
However in the case of this hypothetical gun, the second barrel swings out with the cylinder.

Why complicate it like this? Think of an M203 grenade launcher. Now shrink it down to 20ga and mount it in front of a Ruger .44 magnum.

I would think that any kind of rifling would screw up the patterns. Just pay the $5 AOW tax. Anyway if you did a rifled barreled 20ga it would become a destructive device and a $200 transfer. Not only that but it would give you messed up patterns Hell I think AOW are even legal in California.

Dan

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