Magna Trigger


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Seven High
October 11, 2007, 08:04 AM
Does anyone have experience with the magna trigger? I am considering having it installed on one of my revolvers. What is your opinion on the reliability of the system?

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Brian Williams
October 11, 2007, 10:56 AM
Nope, never heard of it, do you have a web site or other info?

Hawk
October 11, 2007, 11:01 AM
Hmmm.

Found this on Tarnhelm's site:

http://www.tarnhelm.com/magna-trigger/gun/safety/magna1.html

izmarkie
October 11, 2007, 11:02 AM
Seems like a total waste of money. Are you worried about someone grabbing your gun? Keep it concealed, and keep it locked up when it's not on you. Spend the $250 on a safe instead.

Hawk
October 11, 2007, 11:10 AM
This guy seems happy, but apparently one should watch that the magnet doesn't rust.

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=208271

On a less-than-serious note, it would seem to banish one from posting about "stone reliable" revolvers in our occasional "revolver vs semi-auto" cage matches.

foghornl
October 11, 2007, 12:17 PM
Good idea in theory...but what happens when things go Bump! in the night, and your magnetic ring is in the "jewelry box", on bathroom sink/vanity, etc, and Bad Guy(s) are running down the hall toward you?

mainmech48
October 11, 2007, 01:02 PM
I remember seeing a lot in the mags about it back in the mid-to-late '70s from Mas Ayoob and other LEO/writer-types. IIRC, it was first invented for police officers to protect them from being shot with their own weapon should a perp get it away from them. I seem to recall the caveat that the design was such that it could only be installed on 'K' and 'N' frame S&W revolvers. Not really surprising as that company pretty much owned the LE market at the time.

Until this post I wasn't even aware that it was still around. Personally, I'd pass as the only revolver that's kept loaded and stashed in my house is a 640-1 and the Magna outfit wouldn't work on it anyway. I'm also not keen on the idea of modifying a weapon that might be called on to protect myself and my family in such a way that it can only be fired if I'm holding it in the correct hand, that hand is actually wearing the correct ring on the correct finger, that ring is in exactly the right position, etc., etc. to too many decimals.

In its original role as an added 'safety' for an LEO given the time frame and their circumstances I can see some appeal. I'll bet that even back then most of the officers who did spring for it were counting on it to mainly give them time to deploy and use a 'back-up', and that that weapon wouldn't be 'Magna' ed.

Seven High
October 11, 2007, 07:05 PM
Thanks for the replys. I was wondering how this device would work for a security guard working at a hospital emergency room. Gun grabs are a real concern to the administrator of the hospital. Guards are now not armed but are requesting to be armed in the future. If this device works reliably, it might convince the administrator to allow the guards to be armed.

Ratshooter
October 12, 2007, 12:47 AM
You might want to look at the retension type holsters offered by Blackhawk and i think Serpa that have the button that has to be pushed in the release the gun. Most people don't know about these and might swing the boss toward allowing you to go armed.

earplug
October 12, 2007, 12:57 AM
Take your kid shooting at 3 years old, and don't act like A jerk.
Keep jerks out of your home. This trigger thing is BS, what about the shotgun in home etc. Its all about teaching people not to be stupid.

rbmcmjr
October 13, 2007, 12:52 AM
Thanks for the replys. I was wondering how this device would work for a security guard working at a hospital emergency room. Gun grabs are a real concern to the administrator of the hospital. Guards are now not armed but are requesting to be armed in the future. If this device works reliably, it might convince the administrator to allow the guards to be armed.

I'm the guy from that link in post #5. I think it has its uses, but it can't be the only element in your retention/safety plan.

Rick

Brian Williams
October 13, 2007, 10:42 AM
Now I remember it, I think it never really worked as well as planned, a level 3 retention holster has been the answer lately.

Brian D.
October 13, 2007, 11:11 AM
Seven High, just one more little thing to consider about the Magna Trigger: If you work in a hospital, aren't you exposed to some large magnets at various times? Seems like that could interfere with the ring and gizmo.

Reason I thought of that is because of taking a paramedic refresher class where they explained to us that the surgically implanted cardiac defibrillators of that time could be deactivated by exposure to magnets....you know, like the ones in MRI machines at so many medical facilities?

TimboKhan
October 13, 2007, 04:16 PM
Actually, Massad Ayoob mentioned once that he had a magna-trigger installed on one of his daughters guns. He evidently feels that they work OK. I remain somewhat ambivalent.

If your worried about gun snatches, it would seem to me that buying a quality anti-snatch holster would be the better (and far more easily justified to your adminstration) alternative. Magna-triggers might protect you from someone firing the gun, but that doesn't mean that someone theoretically couldn't snatch it and run off with it.

spwenger
October 13, 2007, 11:08 PM
...is that the magnet can wipe out magnetically stored information, such as that which is encoded in strips on credit cards and driver licenses, which would seem to limit the use of a Magna-Triggered gun to times when one is not carrying a wallet or working with things such as computer floppy disks.

As to the ring, you really need two, unless you're willing to bet your life that the gun would only be in your primary hand at the time you most need it. Also, the rings will most likely need to be worn on your middle, not your ring fingers, and, possibly, on the middle phalanx of the finger, as opposed to the usual location for a ring.

That said, if you're interesed in a Magna-Triggered 2 1/2" S&W M-66, with two jewelry-style rings, contact me.

kingpin008
October 14, 2007, 12:46 AM
is that the magnet can wipe out magnetically stored information, such as that which is encoded in strips on credit cards and driver licenses

That's really not that much of a concern. In reality, the magnetic field needed to wipe the data from cards with magnetic strips is much higher than what is used in this sort of system. Magnetic strips on cards and passkeys generally are much harder to corrupt than people think.

The Lone Haranguer
October 14, 2007, 11:13 AM
Originally posted by Brian Williams:
... a level 3 retention holster has been the answer lately.

If the gun is taken away after it has been drawn from the holster, this point becomes moot. ;)

Should someone try to take the gun away, since the time of of this device's development, studies have been done and techniques developed to help stop this.

rbmcmjr
October 14, 2007, 02:47 PM
Also, the rings will most likely need to be worn on your middle, not your ring fingers, and, possibly, on the middle phalanx of the finger, as opposed to the usual location for a ring.

Yes to the middle finger, no to the middle phalange. You wear it like any other ring, just on the middle fingers.

Rick

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