Chef's?


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Irwin
October 11, 2007, 01:54 PM
Hey I was wondering how many chefs here ccw? Though im only 17 the now im training to be a chef but would definetly like to move to america(been 3 times nows and love it:D) How easy is it to conseal a firearm on you when in your chef whites cause i find it hard enough for me Phone not to print. Also do any of you open carry? I rulled this out for meself cause id just ahve to clean it more and if you go out to greet customers it may alarm them. any help would be good Irwin.

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30 cal slob
October 11, 2007, 01:56 PM
thunderwear (smartcarry) won't print under your outfit.

CWL
October 11, 2007, 03:43 PM
I spent some time studying at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, at night, it can be a pretty rough area.

I carried a neck knife on me always.

Firearms carry is definitely going to be limited by the rules of the state & restaurant or venue where you will be working. I doubt if many places are going to want their chefs (especially when you are starting out as a line chef) to open carry any firearms.
A cruise ship? Resort hotel? Disneyland? -never.

If you need to, consider something designed for pocket carry. It will need to be light enough not drag your elastic pants down. It should also be polymer & stainless because of the sweat & humidity you will be slaving under.

Crunker1337
October 11, 2007, 04:20 PM
Hmm...

Try an ankle holster revolver, and a combat-esque knife around your neck (not too long, 4" or so should be perfect).
I wouldn't worry about printing so much, just pretend it's your phone.
Try OWB with a slim single-stack.

JAB
October 11, 2007, 04:39 PM
This reminds me of a great story that is absolutely true, told to me by my boss/mentor and confirmed by other execs at the company I work at, My boss is the owner(family owned multi million dollar hotel company). When my boss was younger running a hotel,south florida in the 80's he went into the kitchen and fired a chef for stealing, the guy got upset and pulled a gun on him, then, another cook pulled a gun on the first guy in defense of my boss. Long story short no shots fired and guy who pulled first gun left premise, 2nd guy stayed. My boss thanked him for the help, no leo called. Both of these men spoke very poor english, later that day my boss said to him something about the stove not working, the guy who saved him never came back to work after that day. My boss still still wonders if the guy may have misunderstood him talking about the stove and thought he was told not to come back. Great true story and confirms that chefs carry, atleast in FL.

Rembrandt
October 11, 2007, 07:23 PM
I would think a skilled chef could use other kitchen utensils just as effectively.....never knew a chef that wasn't a master with a knife, perhaps fling a meat cleaver while useing pots and pans as shields. When all else fails throw hot grease in the perps face then toss him into the Hobart mixer. If he still hasn't had enough hang him on a hook in the cooler till authorities arrive.

(P.S., thought I'd mention my son is a master chef at a very high end establishment, guns in a restaurant kitchen would create more problems than it would solve)

Bart Noir
October 11, 2007, 07:30 PM
It's called the Chef's Special.


Bart Noir

Chuck Perry
October 11, 2007, 08:33 PM
Steven Segal in "Under Seige" comes to mind. He killed like 14 terrorists with kitchen stuff before resorting to a gun. Get to a video store, rent and learn.:neener:

chefman
October 11, 2007, 08:47 PM
Hello Irwin, I have been trained as a pastry chef and I don't ccw because I am pretty handy with a 10 inch chef's knife. However, I would consider carrying a neckblade or small tactical blade in my pocket. Those chef pant's are usually held up by a string or elastic band and makes carrying a firearm difficult.

chefman
October 11, 2007, 08:54 PM
a frozen chicken at 100 feet per second can be painful

SeanSw
October 11, 2007, 09:17 PM
I cook for a living and considered this even though the state of Illinois doesn't allow CCW. A firearm would be difficult to reach beneath my apron and jacket at the front, and at the rear I have the apron strings and a pair of tight fitting checkered pants. I can't think of a good place to secure any kind of holster for fast action, and any protrusion would snag on kitchen equipment all day long. It's very close quarters with people and equipment.

I would pocket carry a very small semi-auto in the rear or side pockets, counting on the cell phone excuse. Last year I dropped my all metal spyderco on the kitchen floor and it skittered beneath a table, and most people thought I had dropped a pistol and tried to kick it out of sight! You would certainly want the smallest, slimmest, most unassuming firearm available.

Though I would not call myself a chef, or a master of the knife, there are plenty of objects that can be pressed into emergency service for self defense. I'd throw an apron over my arm and grab the biggest knife available, like a cloak and rapier duelist.

Irwin
October 12, 2007, 02:38 PM
well I am getting skilled with my knifes but only problem is a 10inch cooks knife is usless against a pistol at 10 feet. pots and pans as sheilds is sumit seagal can tryknife round the neck sound a good idea only prob is reaching it in time. Rembrandt what kind of kitchen has lots of hot grease to hand? macie d's? Also i dont tend to carry a meat cleaver around i have no use for one but i just got a new seki nakari knife which is like a cleaver except for veg and its smaller, but i recon i could take someones head ioff with it after a few hacks:evil: Also if anything i plan to ahve my own restraunt so carrying aint a prob its just how, cheers for the help so far guys Irwin

gandog56
October 15, 2007, 01:42 PM
I cook for a living and considered this even though the state of Illinois doesn't allow CCW.

Then stop considering it. It isn't worth the jail time you get busted.

Quiet
October 16, 2007, 01:44 AM
well I am getting skilled with my knifes but only problem is a 10inch cooks knife is usless against a pistol at 10 feet.
Not so.

Person with a knife within 21 feet is considered a threat even aganist someone with a gun.

Several law enforcement studies have shown a determined aggressor with a knife will be able to inflict multiple stab/slash wounds on a person who is armed with a gun within 21 feet. The aggressor will get shot, but will still be able to inflict mortal wounds aganist the person with the gun.

Use of deadly force is justifiable aganist an aggressor with a knife who is within 25 feet of you.

Jorg Nysgerrig
October 16, 2007, 01:51 AM
Try an ankle holster revolver, and a combat-esque knife around your neck (not too long, 4" or so should be perfect).
I wouldn't worry about printing so much, just pretend it's your phone.
Try OWB with a slim single-stack.

I'm curious about these suggestions. Have you carried an ankle holster in a kitchen enviroment before? Have you found that ankle holster is practical in an enviroment where one is commonly bending over? How about the OWB? That seems like that wouldn't work well with a traditional chef's jacket? What has been your experience with these methods of carry in a place that can be pretty crowded and involve much bending and reaching along with bumping into people?

The phone comment is also interesting. What happens when you're on your phone and it prints? Or perhaps you say it is your phone and your phone is clearly on the table next to you, what then?

foghornl
October 16, 2007, 10:23 AM
A 12" cast iron skillet, properly applied, works very well.

Never mind HOW I know, I just know...

Fisherman_48768
October 16, 2007, 12:51 PM
Irwin: Learn the trade, prepare a good meal and you won't need a gun on the line.

seeker_two
October 18, 2007, 11:57 AM
a frozen chicken at 100 feet per second can be painful

...especially if you use a Smartcarry holster. ;)


:D

Mr Kablammo
October 20, 2007, 12:49 AM
Irwin, the most practical advice is that about the different state laws in the U.S.A. Texas is very different from New York. The state law will determine when and where you can carry.

Also, the lethality of meat cleavers should NOT be underestimated. I asked some Chinese friends about cleavers and homicides in the PRC and I would rather be shot than 'cleaved'. Often after a shooting the perp will run after just one shot because his aggression has been discharged. Chances for recovery are good. But in 'cleaving' the aggressor doesn't stop until you are 'Chop Suey'.

mekender
October 20, 2007, 06:37 PM
having two former roomates that went to Le Cordon Bleu (OCA) i cant imagine them being able to carry easily... the only place practical would be the waist area, and in a kitchen you always have the risk of water and other liquids getting everywhere... not to mention that chefs pants dont normally have belt loops to support a holster.... an ankle holster would be impractical as getting to the gun would require bending over, which might result in a nasty slip in a bad situation...

now, if it were your own place, you could strategically position several firearms at locations throughout the kitchen... but as for carry on person, i dont see it being too effective... if you are worried about going to and from work, you could consider a bag with a carry pocket, those seem pretty effective

Euclidean
October 25, 2007, 02:47 PM
I'm lost. Assuming it was legal, why wouldn't something like a NAA mini, 642, or a P3AT be feasible? I can carry a PF9 in my pajama pants for crying out loud.

arthurcw
October 25, 2007, 03:22 PM
I agree with Euclidean. Where there is a will, there is a way. There are even neck holsters for the P3AT.

That said, I'm not a pro chef but I'm the cook in the home. And since I carry 24/7 (where legal gandog56) I can tell you some of my don'ts.

Center line carry = BAD. Hot pasta water on your gun flushes out a lot of the good lube needed to keep the smokewagon happy. Although it did divert the water and keep it from getting on other things. So you may want to think about Center Line anyway.

Carry a gun with a good finish. It's gonna get dinged, splashed, drenched, and dropped. And I'm not even moving at line cook speeds. Tomato sauce does a number on some metals. Kosher salt is NOT a gun finish’s friend. Oh, and blood is not a friend to bluing. But you are a pro so you've never cut your fingers. :p

My Hard Chrome P3AT is usually my Cooking gun (not to be confused with my Bar-b-que gun). It's small, cheaper than any of my others, and pretty tough. So when I screw it up (and as clumsy as I am, I will), it won't kill me to replace.

But I have to agree with others. You are in a professional kitchen with a lot of other hot angry line cooks. There are literally dozzens of better close quarters combat options hanging from the hooks in there. I pity anyone who bursts in on a bunch of cooks in a professional kitchen. He might wind up as the lunch special the next day without a single shot fired.

rcmodel
October 25, 2007, 03:44 PM
You could carry almost gun you wanted under those big white Chefs hats! :neener:

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

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