Interarms Luger OK?


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KrankyKraut
October 13, 2007, 08:21 PM
I'm thinking of buying an Interarms Luger (made by Mauser in the '70's). I'll be shooting it; it won't be a safe queen. Is that a useable, reliabe gun or will I be buying trouble?

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Hypnogator
October 13, 2007, 09:49 PM
Lugers tend to be finnicky, but they're extremely strong actions. They tend to like hot rounds, so you should have no problem with +P or +P+ ammo. If reliability is a major issue (you're buying it for a carry piece) I would pass for something more modern. If you're buying it for its look and feel, and are willing to do some experimenting with different loads, you should have a fine shooter.

alamo
October 13, 2007, 11:13 PM
I'm thinking of buying an Interarms Luger (made by Mauser in the '70's). I'll be shooting it; it won't be a safe queen. Is that a useable, reliabe gun or will I be buying trouble?

You're just buying it to have a 9MM to shoot for fun? There's plenty of better choices if that's your only requirement. Get one of the surplus P-1s instead if that's all it for.

dfariswheel
October 13, 2007, 11:53 PM
To your question "Is it a usable, reliable gun"?
The answer is, YES.

The Mauser Luger was a very high quality, high end pistol made pretty much like the old originals.
Mauser made Luger's originally and the company had that experience to guide them in the manufacturing of the new ones.

The guns were expensive back in the 70's, and are more so now.
Like all Luger's, they are ammo sensitive, and you may have to experiment to find a brand/type that particular gun "likes".
The Luger is a design that was obsolete by the 1930's, and can be troublesome as far as reliability goes.
However, once you figure out what it wants, it'll make a great shooter.

As far as usability goes, like all Luger's, the safety is awkward, and the trigger is almost always atrocious, just like the originals.
What you get for your trouble is a steel legend, and one of the finest quality guns ever produced.

BillinNH
October 14, 2007, 07:48 AM
<What you get for your trouble is a steel legend, and one of the finest quality guns ever produced.>

Not to mention one of the most beautiful. See thumbnail.

I find my double-dated DWM to be ergonomically perfect and a natural pointer. Mostly I feed it it WWB fmj or equivalent. My only complaint as a shooter is the miniscule rear sight.

Get the Luger, keep it forever. I can't imagine not owning a Luger.

Bill

Pilot
October 14, 2007, 08:28 AM
I bought a WWII reworked Mauser Luger when they came into the country in the mid 90's. As others have said yours was made in the 70's and is of high quality. Mine has been 100% reliable with WWB and UMC standard velocity ammo. Its accurate too. Maybe I just got lucky. My Walther P1/P38 will not shoot reliably however. :rolleyes:

KrankyKraut
November 17, 2007, 08:06 PM
Well, I got my Luger and took it to the range for the first time today. Man, did I have fun! It is the most accuarte automatic I have ever shot. It's neck on neck with my wheelgun, a 4" S&W Mod. 15-3. I shot about 200 rounds of WWB 115 gr. FMJ. They landed where I pointed the gun. The Luger's accuracy made this average shot look good. :) I also thought the ergonomics were outstanding. Hand position was very natural. In two handed shooting, it lent itself to natural hand and finger positioning which made the gun, to use a klischee, "an extension of my hand". On the downside, the sights were hard to see, especially against a black target. It got better when a gaping white ragged hole started to appear in it. Also on the downside, I had about ten, twelve FTF's with either magazine; the original Mauser mag that came with the gun and an aftermarket MecGar. It seems like the Luger prefers the mags loaded to half capacity; anytime I loaded 5 or less rounds, it was OK. More than that, and FTF's raised their ugly heads. I bought the gun slightly used; the bore looks pristine. I wonder if the FTF's will diminish or go away entirely with use.

The Luger got a lot of attention at the range. Most of the guys there had never seen one in the flesh. Its good looks and evident quality was a big hit.

I gotta try different ammo next time to find out what it likes best. So far, I am impressed with this true classic.

HisSoldier
November 17, 2007, 11:02 PM
Here's minehttp://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=67469&d=1195359123

Michael Zeleny
November 17, 2007, 11:28 PM
The Mauser Luger was a very high quality, high end pistol made pretty much like the old originals.Unlike the old forged originals, the post-WWII Mauser Parabellum was fabricated out of investment castings, with the exception of its barrel that was machined out of bar stock.

zeke707
November 18, 2007, 12:37 AM
In purchasing a Luger even post war guns like the 1970s Mauser, you have one fine pistol. Point and shoot is the best of *any* gun, current production and oldies. The Luger is one the finest machine tooled weapons ever (Stamping or plastic not allowed here)!. Only those who have spent time with a German Luger know of what I post here. "Shooters" go for $5/600. Entry level collectibles start around $1200.00. I'm biased as I own 4 Lugers, a 1902 American Eagle 30 cal, two 1917 DWMs and one 1938 DWM which are 9MMs.

They are an eye catcher at the range! Get one and try it.The only problem is, once you have one, watch out, you'll probably have more!;)

Michael Zeleny
November 18, 2007, 02:45 AM
As regards point shooting, the Luger is as good as an automatic gets. The SAA Colt has a slight edge in ergonomics. As a rule, European handguns are not configured for fast draw practice, and the safety lever design of the Luger bears witness to this oversight. The toggle action lends to cycle better with a heavier or longer top end, and feeds bottleneck cartridges somewhat more consistently. In 9x19mm my choice would be the LP08 Artillery model, not the least for being legal to use as a pistol carbine with its detachable board stock. In 7.65x21mm, the best shooting guns to have are the late Swiss variations, the more traditional 06/24 or the strengthened and simplified 1929 model. The Swiss guns are available in near mint condition for under $2,000. Pre-WWI DWM guns exhibit better workmanship, whereas Mauser gund made after 1937 are said to have better metallurgy. Either of the more common German issue P08 pistols will cost upwards of $3,000 in excellent original condition.

All of these guns should be 100% reliable with proper maintenance, new springs, and original spec ammunition. Contrary to popular rumor, its overall length and bullet configuration matter a lot more than chamber pressures and muzzle energy. The Luger magazine feed is designed like most .22 rimfire autoloaders, with cartridges located by riding the bullet nose on the forward slope inside the magazine body. The original German load used a truncated cone bullet set at 29.69mm (1.169") overall length. Winchester white box ammo is a good substitute.

The only downside of shooting a Luger is becoming harder to please with run of the mill bangers. The only service sidearm that can match its accuracy is the SIG P210 (http://larvatus.livejournal.com/33732.html).

Online resources for Luger collectors are second to none. Especially notable are Luger Gunboards operated by Jan C. Still (http://luger.gunboards.com/) and the Luger Forum.com/ (http://www.lugerforum.com/). For your first Luger, I recommend buying from a reputable dealer such as FGS (http://www.fgsinc.8m.com/) or Simpson (http://www.simpsonltd.com/index.php). It is a little harder to identify the products of Waffenfabrik U.S.A. But that information is out there for all who can read between the lines.

KrankyKraut
November 18, 2007, 10:51 AM
Here's a link to a picture I posted previously.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=3823112#post3823112

Michael Zeleny is right. It does spoil you for the "run-of-the-mill bangers"...

Vonderek
November 18, 2007, 11:13 AM
Thanks for dredging up bad memories guys. I had a beautiful '43 byf that I sold for $450 in 2002 after a job layoff. Who knows what I spent the $450 on afterwards. I've been pissed at myself ever since.

Lugers are awesome!

zeke707
November 18, 2007, 01:47 PM
Using +P or +P+ in older, especially pre_WWII Lugers is not recommended. Ball ammo such as Wal*Marts Winchester 115gr is a good choice. If your gun has problems cycling, it's better to look for the cause such as the magazine for resolution. Now for your Mauser 1970s Luger most of what I've posted does not apply, justing adding for those who may acquire an older Luger sometime in the future.:)

Starter52
November 18, 2007, 05:20 PM
KrankyKraut, do you find the "Swiss pattern" P08 that you own is a bit uncomfortable to shoot? I own one of those "grip safety" Mauser P08 pistols and I prefer the later style with a more rounded frame.

And you're correct about reliability. Even with el cheapo "mart" ammo my P08is flawless. I agree with BillinNG that the sights are not the Luger's best feature.

bannockburn
November 18, 2007, 06:38 PM
From Gun Digest 1976:

Browning Hi-Power- $254.50
Colt Government Model- $175.00
Mauser Swiss Pattern 1929 Luger- $299.00
Mauser P08 Pattern Luger- $399.00
There was also mention of another Mauser Luger, this one called the Sport model, as it featured a 4.4" bull barrel, adjustable rear sight, blade undercut front sight, and a certain amount of fine tuning done to the trigger. No price was listed.
The only "modern" day pistol that I can think of that comes close to the legendary Luger grip angle, was the Benelli Model B76. In some ways it even exhibited some other Luger like traits. It was a single stack 9mm. that was purpose built around using military ammuntion, used a fixed barrel design, utilized an unusual hesitation lock breach mechanism, and was almost entirely made using machined steel. Oh, and it also had checkered walnut stocks.

KrankyKraut
November 18, 2007, 07:36 PM
Starter52, yes, I do find them not as comfortable. I would have preferred the P-08 style, but couldn't find any when I was looking. It'll give me an excuse to buy a German-pattern Luger later. :)

Michael Zeleny
November 18, 2007, 07:52 PM
Benelli Model B76 [...] was almost entirely made using machined steel.With the exception of its stamped and welded frame and the chintzy self-cocking trigger linkage.

If you can live with its alloy frame, the Luger-like handgun you are looking for is the Pardini GT (http://hammerli-us.com/Products/Pardini-GT-9--9mm__PAR-spc-GT-9.aspx).

Michael Zeleny
November 19, 2007, 07:00 PM
There was also mention of another Mauser Luger, this one called the Sport model, as it featured a 4.4" bull barrel, adjustable rear sight, blade undercut front sight, and a certain amount of fine tuning done to the trigger. No price was listed.One such just sold (http://www.egun.de/market/item.php?id=1542294) on Egun.de for 1,890.00 EUR.

Jim Watson
November 19, 2007, 07:10 PM
I greatly admired a Mauser Parabellum Sport in 1986 for $1250; but my job was at risk and I was not buying any pistols at the time. Pity, the job lasted long enough for me to retire from and I could now be enjoying the Sport.

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