Handgun Rests


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Matt304
October 25, 2007, 12:02 PM
I just purchased a Lone Eagle pistol with a scope, and I would like a very solid and adjustable rest to sight it in at 200 yards.

I just want the rest to grip the gun very well, and have a stable platform. The ones I have seen so far are just a V that the gun sits in, and you aim. I was hoping to find something that actually straps the gun in tight, like a precision rifle rest - since this is a larger handgun.

Thanks.

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Canuck-IL
October 25, 2007, 02:43 PM
You want a Ransom Rest or equivalent product ... Caldwell recently came out with a less expensive model.

Either device uses model specific inserts that replace the guns grips and clamp the gun into a pivoting, steel housing...usually used with a heavy steel base of some sort. Commonly used for testing Bullseye or PPC guns, inserts are available for most popular pistols.

The original, good but pricey...
http://www.ransomrest.com/

Less expensive, new competition...
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=139272

You'll sometimes encounter a range or club that may have one to loan or rent...assuming you have the correct inserts.

/Bryan

Matt304
October 25, 2007, 05:52 PM
Those look very strong, I like the one from Midway for the price.

The only problem is that there is no frame on this gun. It has what is essentially a grip bolted to a barrel. The grip is all synthetic, and there would be nothing to hold it if the grip was removed. I also don't see a style made for the Lone Eagle pistol.

Is there possibly a mini version of a rifle rest that could strap the barrel in and hold the grip by the sides?

Canuck-IL
October 25, 2007, 06:27 PM
Sorry - never seen such an animal. Some (not enough!, it seems) 'smiths have barrel testers used to evaluate a naked barrel before using it a build but that wouldn't allow a scope to be setup on it...assuming the barrel could be made to fit.
/B

CWL
October 25, 2007, 07:00 PM
There is a customization kit for handguns on the Midway list. You essentially cast your own grip mount for the pistol -although I do not know whether this will work for pistols without grip scales.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=983063

If it were me, I'd use sandbags to securely wedge the pistol into position by having a friend build-up the sandbags around the pistol & my hands in order to sight solidly.

You can also use a bipod to sight-in, just place sandbags placed around the bipod and under gun in order to stabilize the entire pistol.

Matt304
October 25, 2007, 07:18 PM
Hmm, it would work assuming the gap is wide enough for the grip width. I wouldn't want to get the stock all messy though, I'm not quite sure how the mold system works.

Steve C
October 25, 2007, 07:26 PM
Anything that holds the muzzle of the gun down when its fired will not allow you to sight in the gun properly unless you are going to drag it around and use it every time you shoot. A good deal of where the bullet vertically impacts depends upon the recoil since the gun is under recoil before the bullet leaves the barrel. Find a range that has a table where you can rest your wrists but do not tie the barrel down if you are sighting in a handgun that you will normally shoot unsupported.

MrBorland
October 25, 2007, 07:34 PM
A good deal of where the bullet vertically impacts depends upon the recoil since the gun is under recoil before the bullet leaves the barrel.

Don't wanna hijack the thread, but I don't think this is true. A high speed movie of a pistol being fired would show the bullet leaving the barrel long before the slide, let alone the muzzle, even begins to move. Besides, if true, the accuracy of a gun, especially a rifle with a long barrel, would be inversely proportional to the caliber. You can get some pretty impressive accuracy from a .44mag. When recoil affects bullet trajectory, it's because the shooter is flinching.

Steve C
October 25, 2007, 07:48 PM
but I don't think this is true.

Sure its true. If it wasn't then explain why heavier bullets impact higher than lighter bullets even though the heavier bullet is slower and thus has more drop time between the gun and the target. As we know gravity accelerates down at the same rate of 32 fps/s for all objects. It also explains why the path of the bullet is in an arc that rises above the line of sight then drops to point of aim. A rifle or pistol sighted in at 100 yds will hit higher on a target at 50 yds using the same point of aim. Check any of the gun manufacturers ballistic charts and look at point of impact vrs point of aim at various distances short of sight in point and after.

MrBorland
October 25, 2007, 08:05 PM
A rifle or pistol sighted in at 100 yds will hit higher on a target at 50 yds using the same point of aim.


I don't think it has anything to do with recoil putting it there. The smaller faster round has a flatter trajectory, whereas the bigger, slower round has a rainbow trajectory; when the point of impact is before its "zero", the heavy would hit relatively high.

Canuck-IL
October 25, 2007, 10:48 PM
Continuing the hijack ... Tuner and others have laid that one to rest a number of times on this forum. The slide DOES move before the bullet exits ... a 1911 has about 1/10th inch of slide motion before the bullet is gone. Search around, there are at least 2 huge threads about it. Here's a pic - I'll find the 1911 shortly.


http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e346/Canuck-IL/Short/45acp-bullet_leaving.jpg


and here's a video link ... lots to see in this one besides the slide motion.
http://www.trippresearch.com/media/movement/hispeedgateway.html
/B

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