Of All Modern Produced Civi Available Handguns Which Would You Trust......


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cslinger
October 30, 2007, 07:49 PM
Of all modern pistols, revolvers (handguns) which would you trust to be in working shooting condition after say 150 years. Assume the weapon was stored with a modicum of care but not stored with the intent of making it an airtight capsule. You know your basic oiled heavily, placed in a plastic box or oil rags etc. and left in the basement, attic, safe or cabinet. Lets assume we are talking production guns as of this year.

Just musing.

Chris

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Jorg Nysgerrig
October 30, 2007, 07:51 PM
Just about any of them. Except a Glock.

If they are stored properly, what do you think is going to happen to them in the next 150 years that would render them unusable?

lamazza
October 30, 2007, 07:53 PM
Glock or S&W revolver.

cslinger
October 30, 2007, 07:54 PM
I am thinking rust, small part degradation etc. I am really just bored and thinking about what it would be like for somebody to find a Glock 17 200 years from now vs. say a Ruger GP100.

Chris

Geronimo45
October 30, 2007, 08:02 PM
I'd probably opt for an automatic. I think it'd be hell to get cosmoline out of the inner workings of a wheelgun. :D
I guess I'd take a SA 1911. A single-action trigger has less crevices for that dratted cosmoline to creep. DA triggers, though I love 'em, add an extra helping of complexity. As for Glocks - I have no idea. I don't think storage for a hundred-plus years in cosmoline would ruin 'em, but we have no data on the subject. We've had steel-framed autos surviving fine.
Steel has many natural enemies (most of which can be ixnay-ed with a liberal coating of grease), while polymer is more like Superman. The stuff that ruins steel doesn't seem to phase it, but it crumbles when exposed to kryptonite. Steel guns don't care about kryptonite. I couldn't say if the ingredients in cosmoline would turn the plastic to something resembling rubber or no, or if long-term storage in hot places would do it.

Chuhhuniban
October 30, 2007, 08:02 PM
On the basis of simplicity and quality of materials, something along the lines of a Ruger Vaquero or a reissue Colt SAA. I have seen a M1911 (not an A1), however, that was placed in an attic sometime after WWI here in Arizona, found in the 1980s when the house was demolished - the magazine was loaded (Condition 3 when found). After a very, very brief inspection and a little oil on the barrel hood, bushing and cocking ramp, the weapon fired (the old ammo) without a problem. Since that was fifty or sixty years, it was a decent test of your thesis.

MrTuffPaws
October 30, 2007, 08:10 PM
Any of them from the popular manufactures. Almost all designs these days are proven.

CWL
October 30, 2007, 08:16 PM
Colt 1911. There are enough early ones still working after almost 100 years... Seems like a modern copy using modern steels, lubes and protectants could easily last 150 years.

Mannlicher
October 30, 2007, 08:31 PM
any older Smith or Colt revolver.

modifiedbrowning
October 30, 2007, 09:23 PM
Walther P99.

U.S.SFC_RET
October 30, 2007, 09:51 PM
To me there is only one modern pistol out there the venerable M1911 milspec pistol. I trust it with my life. When that thumb safety is up and I mean up I know it is loaded when I look at it. From a couple of angles and from afar. Nothing beats a .45 1911. John moses Browning knew what he was doing even when the federal government wanted that thumb safety on there. No plastic guns for me. No 9mm, no nothing. I shoot those things like nobody's business. The one gun that come close is the XD and that is if there were no other decent 1911s left on earth.

Neo-Luddite
October 30, 2007, 10:15 PM
Really, almost anything made of steel or stainless if stored with minimum care.
A S&W revolver or well-made 1911. Stash extra critical parts--parts do wear out. Store stocks apart from the gun.

A better question--what brand of ammo will make the 150 year journey and still fire? THAT is a hard one.

jamz
October 30, 2007, 10:19 PM
Any decent metal gun. I don't know how the polymers would stand up after 100 years, but metallurgy has been around a while.

geekWithA.45
October 30, 2007, 10:26 PM
I would think that with reasonable but casual storage, your most vulnerable parts would be the springs. Therefore, I'd look for whatever design had the fewest springs in it, or alternately, whatever design had the springset that would be easiest to fabricate with hand tools.

Cosmoline
October 30, 2007, 10:34 PM
A stainless ruger revolver.

The Annoyed Man
October 30, 2007, 10:44 PM
I would think that with reasonable but casual storage, your most vulnerable parts would be the springs. Therefore, I'd look for whatever design had the fewest springs in it, or alternately, whatever design had the springset that would be easiest to fabricate with hand tools.Why not just remove the springs and store them along with the pistol, with no tension on them? I would think that, properly protected from the elements, a 150 year old spring without tension on it would work as well as new when put back in the gun.

czbegenner
October 30, 2007, 10:46 PM
I would trust my 357 security six ruger, my 40.cal Glock, and my 870 rem.

Oh also my k-9 trained police dog.

Jorg Nysgerrig
October 30, 2007, 10:49 PM
Oh also my k-9 trained police dog.

You trust your dog to be "working shooting condition after say 150 years"? :confused:

JesseL
October 30, 2007, 11:19 PM
Really, almost anything made of steel or stainless if stored with minimum care.
A S&W revolver or well-made 1911. Stash extra critical parts--parts do wear out. Store stocks apart from the gun.

A better question--what brand of ammo will make the 150 year journey and still fire? THAT is a hard one.

Nailed it.

I inherited a Colt 1862 Pocket Police 38 Rimfire conversion (145 years old?) that is still in 100% working order, though 38 rimfire cartridges are rarer than hen's teeth these days.

I've also got a Luger P08 and a Colt M1911, both from 1917 (90 years old), that are still working perfectly.

evan price
October 31, 2007, 04:34 AM
Ruger GP100 stainless revolver. Give it a squirt of Mobil One synthetic engine oil, wrap it in some oily rags, put it behind the drywall in your attic and let you great-great-grandkids find it someday.

czbegenner
October 31, 2007, 10:27 AM
HA,ha,ha. ok that was a joke.just the weapons,also got a bolt anchor(highpoint 9mm)

amper
October 31, 2007, 11:35 AM
Give it a squirt of Mobil One synthetic engine oil, wrap it in some oily rags, put it behind the drywall in your attic and let you great-great-grandkids find it someday.

That is, if it doesn't burn down the house with spontaneous combustion first...

Hokkmike
October 31, 2007, 12:17 PM
Any decently made revolver. S&W, Ruger, Colt, etc.

RPCVYemen
October 31, 2007, 12:27 PM
I would think that with reasonable but casual storage, your most vulnerable parts would be the springs.

What happens to springs over time? If untensioned, will they retain their "spring"?

I don't know how the polymers would stand up after 100 years, ...

Am I write in thinking that the major destructive force wrt polymers is UV radiation? I think that I read that the Egyptian mummification process used polymers, and inside a pyramid, they have lasted millennial.

Mike

SlamFire1
October 31, 2007, 12:31 PM
What's to break? Nothing. I would not trust thermoplastic framed stuff, but anything steel, just have to clean out the oil. That stuff will evaporate and turn into a sludge.

What wears a firearm out is use. Stress/strain, metal fatique. All that stuff.

I have an 130 year old Mauser M71/84 to prove that. No use, no wear.

Am I write in thinking that the major destructive force wrt polymers is UV radiation? I think that I read that the Egyptian mummification process used polymers, and inside a pyramid, they have lasted millennial

Sunlight, heat, and oil, is bad for polymers. As for mummies, the process was to keep the meat from being ate up by bacteria. They used salt to dry out the guy, wrapped him up, poured resin, and stuffed them in a hot dry environment. And now that they are unwrapped and in museums, those mummies are falling apart.

-terry
October 31, 2007, 02:18 PM
I've got a flintlock from the 1800's. THe striker spring still works fine.

CajunBass
October 31, 2007, 02:33 PM
I can't think of any I wouldn't trust. There are plenty of original weapons from the American Civil war, and even older that still work. I don't even KNOW of any particular reason that polymer guns wouldn't work.

RNB65
October 31, 2007, 02:44 PM
All of them. As long as there's enough oil that the steel doesn't rust away, they'll work as well a couple centuries down the road as they do now.

jonboynumba1
October 31, 2007, 02:53 PM
I've heard multiple accounts of 1911's left in nightstands or under beds or other hidy-holes for decades in condition 1 and still fired and functioned. We had a nice GI 1911 that was obviously well used since (I think it was 1926) and it still shot very well...after a few rounds of ball knocked to corrossion that wouldn't brush out of the bbl for me downrange (LOL) After the first couple mags it tightened up to about 2-3" groups at 15 yards. It looked like it was dragged behind a truck and used as a boat anchor! Revolvers sometimes have small parts bind or spring issues inside on DA's...a SA revolver would be mighty stout even left to time with regular oil on it...we know this because we've seen them 100 years old and still in working order. GLOCKs are might reliable but they've only been around aabout a quarter century...so who knows. If the guns break the frames would at least make nice Austrian doggie chew toys! (LOL) :rolleyes:

The Bushmaster
October 31, 2007, 04:38 PM
Most of them except Glock and Ron Paul...:evil:

Ghost Tracker
October 31, 2007, 05:16 PM
I have a Civil War era Colt Cap & Ball revolver that was found encased in a solid block of candle-wax previously poured molten into a long-since rusted-away metal tin. When the wax was warmed to temperature the Colt emerged in pristine working order & condition.

Any modern handgun secured from moisture, light & air should make the trip without issue

obxned
October 31, 2007, 06:03 PM
1911

goon
October 31, 2007, 10:29 PM
Any of them that worked.
There really isn't a whole lot that can go wrong with even just a minimal amount of care.
IIRC, the Brown Bess is the pre-1900 weapon with the most surviving examples.
And most of them saw HARD use.

Autolycus
October 31, 2007, 10:41 PM
An HK P2000 because it is my favorite gun. Though a Sig P22X would also be on my list.

Autolycus
October 31, 2007, 10:44 PM
An HK P2000 because it is my favorite gun. Though a Sig P226/228/229/220 would also be on my list. I prefer polymer myself.

I think most guns will last.

The question is will the 1911 be alive and well in another 100 years?

fearless leader
October 31, 2007, 11:54 PM
I don't think guns will exist in other than museums in 150 years.

Srigs
November 1, 2007, 01:45 AM
Easy one. A Smith and Wesson K-frame... my preference is a Model 15.

TimboKhan
November 1, 2007, 02:18 AM
I honestly can't think of a modern gun from a reputable manufacturer that I wouldn't trust in that amount of time. I obviously have my favorites like anyone else, but I think any handgun, provided a certain level of maintenance and care, will easily last that long. I don't really buy into the whole argument that polymer frames are going to be worthless, but I guess if I had to pick a group that would fail, that would be it. Time will tell on that one.

SDDL-UP
November 2, 2007, 12:49 PM
WAX - now there is a cool idea!

I've never even considered such a thing, but it's not a bad idea for real LONG TERM storage. Better yet, vacuum pack it in a couple layers of those vacuum bags, THEN wax it. If you only coated it in an inch or so of wax you could easily break it off in an emergency to retrieve the gun. Keep it in a protective box or ammo can so the wax won't get broken and it would be about ideal for long term storage.

Oily rags = big NO NO! Extreme fire hazard!

+1 on steel guns. It's not that I don't own polymer framed guns, I own plenty and like them, but for all of their development they can't simulate TIME! They can test for wear and tear, sunlight exposure, heat and cold, etc., but not time.

Dr.Rob
November 2, 2007, 04:11 PM
Have several Colts approaching 100 years old that I shoot regularly. Bet my Ruger Vaquero will last that long too.

I do NOT trust plastics to be around that long.

whited
November 2, 2007, 04:49 PM
Just about any of them. Except a Glock.

Glocks have fewer parts than most modern semi-autos.

It is also a proven design with standard parts and forgiving tolerances.

I would expect that of most modern semi-autos, the Glock would be among
the first I would choose from a box in 150 years, oil it up, load it, and
expect it to go bang just as it had from day 1.

My first choice would be a large frame revolver from any of the big
manufacturers, though.

VirgilCaine
November 2, 2007, 05:40 PM
I have a Civil War era Colt Cap & Ball revolver that was found encased in a solid block of candle-wax previously poured molten into a long-since rusted-away metal tin. When the wax was warmed to temperature the Colt emerged in pristine working order & condition.

That's a pretty cool idea, I like it.

whited
November 2, 2007, 06:40 PM
I don't think guns will exist in other than museums in 150 years.

They probably said that 150 years ago, too. :neener:

2ndamd
November 3, 2007, 01:26 PM
As many have said I'd take the SS GP100 over the Glock 17 in 150 years.

haybaler
November 3, 2007, 09:15 PM
My 1911 is 90 years old. I don't see any reason why it still won't be working 60 years from now. There's no finish left on it but it works just as it was designed to. Most of my rifles and shotguns are over 50 years old and function just fine. Any gun should last 150 years unless it's been shot out by hundreds of thousands of rounds.

doc2rn
November 4, 2007, 01:08 AM
+1 on Ruger

However my S&W Model 10 is older than I am and it will easily make it to the 100yr mark.

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