Tru-Tracer shotgun shells?


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Robert Hairless
November 21, 2007, 10:49 PM
Has anyone here used Tru-Tracer shells? If so, what has been your experience with them?

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Hoser
November 21, 2007, 11:16 PM
A novelty at best. Fun for kids.

Robert Hairless
November 22, 2007, 12:12 AM
Thanks, Hoser, but I'd hoped to get information and maybe come to my own conclusions.

Why are they "a novelty at best"? Is the tracing path diffuse or dispersed? Is the performance not typical of other ammunition? Does the ammunition function reliably? Does it foul the shotgun? Does it have severely limited range?

sargenv
November 22, 2007, 12:21 AM
If you can use them in your area, I've found that it helps highlight where you might be putting your pattern when shooting a clays game. It will confirm for you that, if you are not on target, where your center of pattern is and what you might need to do to correct it. A buddy of mine got some of these many years back and we fired them at night on a lighted skeet field and they light up the center of the pattern pretty well. Problem was, he was already on target so they were a novelty for us since he was already center of pattern with his hits.

Robert Hairless
November 22, 2007, 01:06 AM
That's part of what I was wondering about, sargenv: whether it could be helpful in instructing novices. Do you think that, say, a #8 Tru-Tracer would perform roughly the same as ordinary #8?

SDC
November 22, 2007, 07:40 AM
I've fired around half a dozen of these, and had so-so luck with them; sometimes, the tracer wouldn't ignite, or it was only visible out past the point where it was useful. I found that watching the wad turned out to be more useful, and if someone was to spray-paint a bunch of wads a bright fluorescent green colour and reload those, it would probably be more useful as a training aid.

Oldnamvet
November 22, 2007, 10:39 AM
Makes me wonder if coating the shot with some type of bright paint would be useful. I know some guys can see the shot pattern but most of us old guys no longer have the visual acuity for that.

Hoser
November 22, 2007, 10:50 AM
Lots of times the tracer part would not be where the shot was. I would shoot a fast crosser, break it hard and the tracer part would be 2-3 feet behind the bird. Thats assuming it would ignite at all.

For training, bad. For shooting tin cans with kids, good time.

Robert Hairless
November 25, 2007, 06:27 PM
Oh darn. Another bright idea bites the dust.

Thank you all for the information, though.

goon
November 25, 2007, 07:20 PM
I had some of them given to me once. They didn't light reliably. I'd just spend the extra $$ on another box of #6 low brass at Walmart and call it a day.

sargenv
November 25, 2007, 07:27 PM
I wonder if these aren't lighting mostly due to age. Do they even make them anymore? I think what some of the other people suggest are viable alternatives and probably cheaper. Load a bright colored wad, maybe load them like, say 1050 fps or 1100 fps as opposed to the standard 1200 fps 3 dram stuff. I generally judge where my patterns are by where the wad is located whether I'm ahead or behind targets. If you are chipping the clays, you can generally tell if you are hitting the front edge or the back edge depending on how it chips and breaks. I see using them as one training aid in an arsenal of ideas. Maybe mounting a hosercam on someone shooting clays that knows what they are doing is a good way to show a novice how it's done from the shooter's eye view.

Robert Hairless
November 25, 2007, 11:07 PM
Thanks, Sargenv, but my bright idea was to help real novices by letting them see exactly the path their shot was taking by using a couple of tracers as a quick and easy training aid.

I don't know if it would have helped even if the shells were reliable and performed exactly as regular shells, but I was willing to experiment.

Dionysusigma
November 26, 2007, 11:31 AM
There is still the aforementioned paint option regarding the shot itself in a regular #8. The human eye's attracted to lightly (and fluorescent) colored objects.

Ideal situation would be shot painted fluorescent yellow on a range lit with black lights, but failing that, white-painted shot on a sunny morning or afternoon with the sun behing the shooter might be a good way to go (if the smoke doesn't obscure).

Never tried it before, so I don't know.

Oldnamvet
November 26, 2007, 01:09 PM
I looked into spray painting some shot a bright color. Since the shot is so dark, a single coat does little. Multiple coats turn it into a gummy mess with the shot stuck together. Good thought but not practical.

Dionysusigma
November 27, 2007, 12:07 AM
Wouldn't it blast apart when fired? :confused:

Oldnamvet
November 27, 2007, 09:35 AM
Blast apart? Somewhat but I am sure the pattern would be patchy as clumps of shot stuck together. I have some other thoughts along that line but long shots until I check things out.

Wild Bill Kelso
November 30, 2007, 02:58 PM
The US military uses a dayglo orange talcum powder like substance as visual references with certain weaponry - perhaps it might make a good application with shotgun shells.

Have no idea where you'd get it, but, when reloading, adding it to a shot column would add minimal weight - it would ride up the barrel contained in the shot cup along with the shot, then disperse as the shot projected beyond the disacrded shot cup.

BridgeWalker
November 30, 2007, 03:13 PM
I'm probably way too inexpert to discuss this intelligently, but wouldn't encouraging a beginning to look for their shot column or wad take the focus off the bird and start ingraining some bad habits? If they are focusing on the target, then a misplaced shot is off on the periphery anyway. Would you want to pull that focus off the bird and out into the surrounding area just to take a look around?

Oldnamvet
November 30, 2007, 05:07 PM
The idea would be for their coach to tell them how to adjust their point. It is great when someone can tell you to increase/decrease the lead etc. With your head down on the stock, recoil, etc. it would be virtually impossible to tell what you are doing without lifting your head --bad habits to break later for sure.:(

PJR
November 30, 2007, 05:31 PM
I found that watching the wad turned out to be more useful, and if someone was to spray-paint a bunch of wads a bright fluorescent green colour and reload those, it would probably be more useful as a training aid.
The wad is not a reliable indicator of where your shot is going. Try it yourself at the patterning board. The wad can fly off in all directions.

Sometimes if conditions are right (at night under the lights or late in the day with the sun behind you can see the other guy's shot pattern).

I've used the tracer rounds and found them only average for knowing where your shot is going.

SDC
November 30, 2007, 05:43 PM
The wad is not a reliable indicator of where your shot is going.

For trap, I'd agree 100%, but for skeet (where I had the HARDEST time figuring out the leads), I found that the wad usually stayed on line with the shot charge until after the whole thing has passed the target anyway.

rero360
November 30, 2007, 07:59 PM
instead of paint, how about powder coating the shot? just to go a bit to the extreme

BridgeWalker
November 30, 2007, 08:59 PM
The idea would be for their coach to tell them how to adjust their point.

That makes more sense. Thank you for clarifying. :)

Robert Hairless
November 30, 2007, 11:17 PM
Oldnamvet explained exactly what I want to do, delta9. Could help to bring someone along more surely. Make sense?

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