Tenifer vs Melonite


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Slater
December 3, 2007, 02:49 PM
The "Tenifer" process is used by Glock to harden it's slides and barrels, and as far as I can tell, is proprietary to Glock. "Melonite" is used by companies such as Smith & Wesson for similar purposes.

I've heard that Tenifer cannot be used in the US because of (1) it's proprietary nature or (2) it's environmentally toxic.

Are these essentially the same process or are there significant differences?

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Josh Aston
December 3, 2007, 02:52 PM
From what I understand they are essentially the same thing.

hso
December 3, 2007, 02:55 PM
The process and results are the same, the names are changed.

Greenfurniture's Coal Creek Armory has melonite surface treatments done.

Jim Watson
December 3, 2007, 02:58 PM
It is all a family of processes (not one magic formula) for carbo-nitriding steel to harden the surface. The trade names are Tenifer in Europe, Melonite in the USA, and Tufftride in most of the rest of the world. But they are all part of the same series of products and processes from Durferrit GMBH.

In their own words: "...great efforts were devoted to the development and launching of the TENIFERŽ process, which is also known worldwide under the trade names of TUFFTRIDEŽ and MELONITEŽ."

http://www.durferrit.com/en/unternehmen/firmengeschichte.htm

mikec
December 3, 2007, 03:05 PM
Found this somewhere else:
But the original German formulation for the "Tennifer" carbonitriding salt bath used 60% sodium cyanide and cyanate and 40% potassium cyanide and cyanate.... That's why the EPA wouldn't let anyone do it here.
The process has to be cyanide free here.
As far as I can find out, some places in Europe are still using cyanide salts.

From what I have read, the process has been evolving.

Jim Watson
December 3, 2007, 03:18 PM
There are cyanide bath hardening and plating operations all over. Wastes are strictly regulated but the processes are not banned. Although there are a lot of cyanide-free chemistries being advertised on the basis of waste treatment cost reduction.

Rock
December 3, 2007, 05:56 PM
I've heard that Tenifer cannot be used in the US because of (1) it's proprietary nature or (2) it's environmentally toxic.

Another internet myth. Let me guess, you read it on Glock talk?:D

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