Primer Sealant


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Chiseler
December 17, 2007, 03:00 AM
Looking at the little ways to better my handloads, everything from leveling out the primer pocket to reaming flashholes. Stumbled across primer sealant while I was browsing about. I recall that our USMC ammo is all sealed, from 9mm up to 40mm HEDP. Does it help much in ammo not for machine guns? Do you have to crimp the primer pocket like military ammo? And do you have to use that asphalt-looking sealer on the actual bullet for it do anything? Thanks for any input you can give me.

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Ben Shepherd
December 17, 2007, 08:51 AM
It's not needed really. But if you want to, George & Roys primer sealant works well. I use it on my hunting ammo. Some folks use clear nail polish.

308win
December 17, 2007, 08:58 AM
I use a spray on baked clear-coat automotive finish on all of my ammunition as I store it in my water garden to keep it safe from prying eyes. Oh yes, and I spot weld my primers into the primer pocket (I have developed a proprietary process that doesn't cook off the primer or powder)

I used to epoxy the bullet into the case but stopped doing this when I encountered high pressure signs that I thought might be related to this step.

davidjblythe
December 17, 2007, 09:07 AM
lol :D

rcmodel
December 17, 2007, 01:11 PM
If you don't plan on setting in a water-filled foxhole for days on end, it is not needed.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

Winger Ed.
December 18, 2007, 12:40 AM
For practical use, sealing ammo like mil. spec. stuff is a solution to a problem that doesn't really exist.

I've had reloads, and civilian factory ammo go through the washing machine on several ocassions when I'd leave it in my pockets.
It all worked fine afterwards.

As a old Air Winger, with all my delicate sensativities:
My idea of 'roughing it' is only having a black & white TV/basic cable in the motel room.
So,,, I figure I wouldn't get any wetter than a ride in the washing machine on a hunting trip,,
so I don't bother to seal ammo any more.

.

AirplaneDoc
December 18, 2007, 12:55 AM
I've had reloads, and civilian factory ammo go through the washing machine on several ocassions when I'd leave it in my pockets.
It all worked fine afterwards

I bet that could cause a interesting mess in the house, and really pi$$ off the wife.

PO2Hammer
December 18, 2007, 02:30 PM
I had a box of CCI Blazer (aluminum) .40 cal spill on a wet shooting bench on a rainy day.

After a short range session I scooped al the remaining cartridges into a plastic bag and took everything home.

I forgot about the ammo 'till the next range session.

Half of the first twenty rounds failed to ignite in my Sig. Luckily there were no squibs, so evidently powder was staying dry, but some of the primer were ruined.

Not a biggy with practice ammo, but if I load anything for storage or hunting, I seal the primers.

goon
December 19, 2007, 12:41 AM
PO2Hammer - what product do you seal the primers with? I want to start doing this.
It's true that is probably isn't necessary but I still want to load the most reliable ammunition that I can.

DWARREN123
December 19, 2007, 01:53 AM
Basically used by the military for ammo that will see less than good conditions and long storage, not really needed for soon to be used reloads. The crimp for the primer is used to make sure a primer does not pop out in a combat situation, also not needed for reloads.

Winger Ed.
December 19, 2007, 03:23 AM
Doc:

That ain't nothing.........

A big event around here was 'the time before last' when I washed all the range brass I picked up after a day at the public pistol range.I normally washed all of it in the Kitchen sink, layed it out on the dinner table for a few days to dry, sorted it, then tumbled, and reloaded at my leisure.

In the 6-7 years after I 'unloaded' the first wife--- it was a good system, and worked real well.

However:
After I re-married,
I had to speed up my process of all the 'guy stuff' being in the Kitchen/dining room for weeks at a time.So,,,,,,,,
One day, I came in from the range, washed all the brass I'd scrounged in the sink,
then put it all in the new wife's cake and roasting pans........

Popped them all in the oven to dry real quick instead of laying it all out on the dinning room table for a few days...

I figured:
Water boils off at 212. I need dry brass- real quick.
--------Put brass in oven at 300,,,,
I (should) get 'dry' brass before new wife gets home from work, busts me,
and chews on my 'transom'.

Yep--- you guessed it,
A minute or so after she walks in: "BOOM",,,,,, a cook off in the oven.
It was kind of hard on her cake pans-- but I survived.....

Next time I came in from the range-------- same system, same timing,,,,,,,,,,,
And: "BOOM"!! another live .45ACP cooked off in the oven.........

Since none of it ever went off/detonated- (yet).
Live ammo in the washing machine is no big deal.
.

PO2Hammer
December 19, 2007, 05:18 AM
PO2Hammer - what product do you seal the primers with? I want to start doing this.
It's true that is probably isn't necessary but I still want to load the most reliable ammunition that I can.

I use the stuff from Midwayusa, but when that runs out I'll switch to a cheaper fingernail polish, probably red so I can see it better.

Seal after the round is loaded.

308win
December 19, 2007, 11:10 AM
Anything that isn't water soluable should work. A question arises: if the primer isn't tight fitting enough to be self-sealing won't the sealant itself or fumes etc. have the potential to cause primer failure?

PO2Hammer
December 19, 2007, 03:17 PM
Anything that isn't water soluable should work. A question arises: if the primer isn't tight fitting enough to be self-sealing won't the sealant itself or fumes etc. have the potential to cause primer failure?

I wondered about that myself. I think the laquer based sealants including fingernail polish dry/thicken quite quickly, preventing a problem.
I've never had a problem with sealed ammo, either factory or home brew.

rcmodel
December 19, 2007, 03:54 PM
Primers are sealed from the factory when they are made with a foil disk under the anvil, and a drop of Lacquer. That's why they are red, or green, or whatever.

Unless you are smashing them way too hard when you seat them, they are already sealed!

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

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