Anybody have a homemade gun?


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BigBlock
December 25, 2007, 03:56 AM
I've been wanting to build my own derringer from scratch for a while now...I finally just ordered the barrel. I'm curious, has anybody else here built their own gun? (not talking about kits here) I'd love to see some pics...;)

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herohog
December 25, 2007, 08:38 AM
I hope you checked with the Feds and got a Mfg. Liscence...

ptmmatssc
December 25, 2007, 08:47 AM
I hope you checked with the Feds and got a Mfg. Liscence...

I don't believe you need one unless your building to sell . Personal use should be OK .
Just my take on what I've read . There are threads about this very thing and a simple search query should bring them up .

Cannonball888
December 25, 2007, 08:49 AM
Ted Kaczynski's non-machined pistol

http://www.kk.org/streetuse/unabomber.jpg

SDC
December 25, 2007, 09:49 AM
Anyone on this planet who can get to a hardware store with $10 in their pocket can build a functioning firearm; do a search for "Richardson Guerilla Gun" for an example of how simple they can be.

mikec
December 25, 2007, 10:55 AM
I hope you checked with the Feds and got a Mfg. Liscence...

With the exception of California I do think every state allows a person to make a firearm for personal use. There are places that sell AK receiver flats, piece of metal with holes punched but not formed into a workable shape. After you bend it you have a functioning AK receiver.

CA doesn't allow the manufacture of handguns and since AKs are on some form of no no list I don't think you can build your own AK receiver there either.

mattsb2000
December 25, 2007, 12:37 PM
With the exception of California I do think every state allows a person to make a firearm for personal use. There are places that sell AK receiver flats, piece of metal with holes punched but not formed into a workable shape. After you bend it you have a functioning AK receiver.

CA doesn't allow the manufacture of handguns and since AKs are on some form of no no list I don't think you can build your own AK receiver there either.

Incorrect.

People build AK's in CA all the time.

ptmmatssc
December 25, 2007, 12:46 PM
With certain exceptions a firearm may be made by a non-licensee provided it is not for sale and the maker is not prohibited from possessing firearms. However, a person is prohibited from assembling a non-sporting semi-automatic rifle or non-sporting shotgun from imported parts. In addition, the making of an NFA firearm requires a tax payment and approval by ATF. An application to make a machine gun will not be approved unless documentation is submitted showing that the firearm is being made for a Federal or State agency.

http://www.atf.treas.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#a7

4v50 Gary
December 25, 2007, 12:50 PM
You'd think Ted being the woodworker that he was could make a better gun. Frankly, I'm disappointed with that gun of his.

doc2rn
December 25, 2007, 01:03 PM
I made one once for a friend who said he would never own a store bought gun. Didn't tell him where I got the parts to build it, and he thinks I am the greatest engineer without a degree. Built him a marlin 22 from 2nd hand parts on Ebay except for the heavy barrel I orderred so it wouldn't have writing on it.

mustanger98
December 25, 2007, 02:15 PM
No zip guns for me. If I were to build my own, I think I'd want to build a rolling block. It's a heavy, tough action with about three moving parts. I think I'd chamber it to .303British or .30-40Krag with a 10-24" medium weight barrel.

AirForceShooter
December 25, 2007, 04:07 PM
Sure did.
Someday I'd love to meet the genuis that figured out a car radio antenna is a perfect barrel for a .22.

It even worked.

AFS

TAB
December 25, 2007, 04:31 PM
You can make a gun out of thick walled PVC that will shoot( once) with black powder.

Geno
December 25, 2007, 04:34 PM
BigBlock:

You hittin' the eggnog again?! Or is it the rum-dipped fruitcake this year?

Doc2005

herohog
December 25, 2007, 04:45 PM
I would still advise extreme caution here given past actions of the BATF(E):

The weapon they're using is a really fine point...what is the definition of "manufacturing a firearm"? That phrase is NOT defined in any legislation and, since it's not a legally defined term, it's open to interpretation. Since the late 1990s, when the then ATF hit gunsmith Jim Clark Senior for "manufacturing a firearm" (which cost Jim more than $100,000 but alledgedly clarified the question) was "making or providing the controlled, or serial-numbered, part."

The new BATF definition of "manufacturing a firearm" is "making any substantive changes to a firearm."

Link (http://michaelbane.blogspot.com/2006/03/batf-jihad-against-custom-gunsmths.html)

GlowinPontiac
December 25, 2007, 04:48 PM
does a tripod mounted potato gun count?

if so then yes i did build a gun once when i was younger.

brentn
December 25, 2007, 05:06 PM
I've always thought of making my own muzzle loader completley from scratch. I'm not machinest or skilled in carpentry but I could whip one together with the right materials.

I've always wanted to make a 50BMG rifle out of a 1919 barrel, single shot with a nice wood stock, something with an internal firing pin and simple spring setup.

Macmac
December 25, 2007, 06:08 PM
I built the brass barrel flinter pistol in this pic from dead scratch, shop junk. The Nor West Gun was a rough kit, more like a barrel and a hunk of wood. The 1860 clone was a also a pretty rough kit.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mac_muz15/1515376059/in/set-72157602316185780/

I also sewwed the bags, and made the sliver on them, and the stone arrow heads.. Balmora hat too.. But I didn't grow those feathers...

goon
December 25, 2007, 07:17 PM
There isn't anything illegal about building a blackpowder gun from a kit.

mustanger98
December 25, 2007, 07:23 PM
I've always thought of making my own muzzle loader completley from scratch. I'm not machinest or skilled in carpentry but I could whip one together with the right materials.

brentn, That's me too. I've been watching the price of T/C Hawkens and I'm wanting a left-handed sidelock. To build it might be the ticket.

One thing... you test the barrel before you complete the rifle. The proof load as used by the Williamsburg riflesmiths is 4X the normal load of black powder. If you light that and you still have a barrel afterward, then you complete a rifle.

herohog
December 25, 2007, 07:25 PM
yes, I know the BP kits are out there, it's the metallic cartridge guns I wonder about. That bit about building an AK from a kit, making your receiver from a steel sheet, I am pretty sure will land ya in jail... so will the old grease gun kits minus the receiver where ya made the receiver from a piece of muffler tubing.

Ash
December 25, 2007, 07:28 PM
Dad made a BP pistol almost 100% from scratch, barrel, stock, lock, trigger, guard. The only thing he bought was the nipple. Did it just to see if he could. Loaded it to 44 caliber and called it the Riddle Model #2. #1 I suppose was a prototype as I never encountered it. As to making your own gun, if it is not fully automatic nor readily converted to auto, then it is legal to make it yourself. Guys build AK's from receiver flats all the time. You just can't sell it.

Ash

herohog
December 25, 2007, 07:33 PM
When I referred to the AK, I meant the full-auto version. I poked around and couldn't find anything saying it wasn't, as long as it doesn't violate the NFA and you never sell it... color me surprised!

razerface
December 25, 2007, 07:41 PM
no,no,no,,,,,you CANNOT build ANYTHING full auto without going to prison. To buy one that already exists,,you must pay the gov't $200 tax and fill out form 4.

herohog
December 25, 2007, 07:46 PM
I got that, see my NFA remark.

Pigspitter
December 25, 2007, 07:46 PM
I still think that building a gun out of pvc and whatever was left over from you last lawnmower sounds like a good way to lose your booger hook.

ShackleMeNot
December 25, 2007, 08:04 PM
I built my own 1919.

Ash
December 25, 2007, 08:05 PM
Heh, made a potato cannon that could cut spuds to proper diameter and then launch them with oh so reckless abandon. White Rain is the ideal propellant (better even than ether).

Ash

scrat
December 25, 2007, 08:10 PM
Now adays here in the peoples republic of **********. i would not dare to think about building a firearm. Unless black powder.

TAB
December 25, 2007, 08:24 PM
Well if i go back over 20 years ago. i made a firecracker gun. Basicly a small pipe with a cap. The cap had a hole drilled in it. You would remove the cap. Then place a firecracker in it. with the fuse hanging out. then you would put a lead projectile in it. After that it was all about aiming it when you lit the fuse. But thats all. Now adays here in the peoples republic of **********. i would not dare to think about building a firearm. Unless black powder.

you know you just admitted to a felony on the internet...


PS... I may or may not have made one of those as a teenager... I've also heard that cherry tomatos work really good as bullets...

akolleth
December 25, 2007, 08:24 PM
AK built from a parts kit,

Obviously not from scratch, but I sure get the feeling that its my own creation.
Would not sell her for any amount of money.

http://home.earthlink.net/~akolleth/ak.jpg

Roswell 1847
December 25, 2007, 08:33 PM
Quote:
Well if i go back over 20 years ago. i made a firecracker gun. Basicly a small pipe with a cap. The cap had a hole drilled in it. You would remove the cap. Then place a firecracker in it. with the fuse hanging out. then you would put a lead projectile in it. After that it was all about aiming it when you lit the fuse. But thats all. Now adays here in the peoples republic of **********. i would not dare to think about building a firearm. Unless black powder.

you know you just admitted to a felony on the internet...


PS... I may or may not have made one of those as a teenager... I've also heard that cherry tomatos work really good as bullets...

I built a fairly good representation of a French 75, wheeled carriage, gunshield, and all, when I was a kid.
I used the old style Cherry Bombs, the kind that really blew fingers off, to propel Black Walnuts still in the husks to amazing distances.
Now days I can look down range of my artillery experiments and see dozens of mighty Black Walnut Trees that sprang from those impromptu projectiles.

CypherNinja
December 25, 2007, 08:35 PM
I'm just finishing up my AK, after that it'll be a 22 after I get my lathe. :D

If you haven't already, stick your head in over at RCG (http://www.homegunsmith.com).

Bezoar
December 25, 2007, 09:25 PM
Few years ago you could still legally make a single rifle/shotgun per year that used metal cartridges. Although i found links on guys who did, it was always either a single/double barrel break open, or a rolling block. Still, go ask the ATF.
Although if your planning on selling a homebuilt cartridge gun, youll need a manufactureing FFL.

BigBlock
December 26, 2007, 12:34 AM
This was not meant to be a legal discussion; however, the law is, if you can legally own it, you can legally build it. You just can't sell it.

goon
December 26, 2007, 01:24 AM
Too bad we can't build NFA stuff because I think it cuts down on the great ideas/concepts that could go into military weapons.
I've have an idea for a great PDW/cartridge that would be awesome and inexpensive for the military for quite some time now but there isn't any point in even thinking about it because it's so difficult to do it legally.

But I digress.
When in doubt, call the ATF and ask them.
They are not always the kitten stomping ogres they're so often made out to be.

NeoSpud
December 26, 2007, 01:40 AM
Heh, made a potato cannon that could cut spuds to proper diameter and then launch them with oh so reckless abandon. White Rain is the ideal propellant (better even than ether).

Heck, you need to cut out the middle man and just use propane!

I'm a bit of a spudgun enthusiast, you might say. For example:
http://s31.photobucket.com/albums/c385/Spudtech/?action=view&current=side.jpg

or just anything on NeoSpud.com :D

As for real guns, I'm in the process of putting together a simple .22 single-shot. It's my first venture into building real firearms, so I figure that I should start small caliber :p

Ash
December 26, 2007, 08:01 AM
We did use propane, but cracked the breach on our first design and singed my brother-in-law's eye brows. We went back to the cruder but lower operating pressures of White Rain! The trouble with White Rain is it tends to foul the igniter.

Ash

CypherNinja
December 26, 2007, 08:20 AM
Too bad we can't build NFA stuff because I think it cuts down on the great ideas/concepts that could go into military weapons.
I've have an idea for a great PDW/cartridge that would be awesome and inexpensive for the military for quite some time now but there isn't any point in even thinking about it because it's so difficult to do it legally.


Actually, you can build any NFA items you want, except machineguns.

Just file your Form 1's, and don't build them specifically for sale. :D

shooting time
December 26, 2007, 09:03 AM
I built a blackpowder cannon that has a 1 3/4" bore from scratch

herohog
December 26, 2007, 09:25 AM
I understand cannon is ok (smooth bore) to build/own where as Howitzers (rifled bore) are not. Anyone know?

Cannonball888
December 26, 2007, 09:49 AM
I understand cannon is ok (smooth bore) to build/own where as Howitzers (rifled bore) are not.

Just a correction in your terminology. A howitzer isn't different from a cannon---it's a type of cannon and it isn't necessarily rifled. Howitzers may be rifled or smoothbore, but so can other cannon types. The real difference between the three cannon types (gun, howitzer, and mortar) has do with their relative trajectories which dictate their use.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/229/467611919_ea0e90b44f.jpg?v=0
Smooth bore 1837 US Mountain Howitzer 12-pounder



To answer your question---Anyone without a license can build a rifled cannon if it's a BP muzzleloader.

herohog
December 26, 2007, 10:02 AM
any restrictions on bore dia.?

Cannonball888
December 26, 2007, 10:09 AM
Nope. There are plenty of companies that make rifled cannons with a 3" diameter (Parrot and Ordinance rifles). It's BP and no license required.

herohog
December 26, 2007, 10:15 AM
must have...

Ash
December 26, 2007, 10:17 AM
Guns fire the lowest trajectory and are typically, but not always, line-of-sight. 16" cannons on battleships are excellent examples of guns.

Howitzers fire the medium trajectory and are the typical artillery piece. They are rarely line-of-sight.

Mortars fire the highest trajectory and are more often portable and with the shortest range. They were used in the Revolutionary War and progressively got bigger. The British used mortars on ships to bomb fortifications (Ft. St. Philip endured 9 days of mortar fire in 1814 prior to and during the Battle of New Orleans). Giant mortars were used in the War Between the States and even bigger ones were installed during the Endicott period. Following WWI they became smaller and smaller until now they are largely a portable, short range cannon.

Ash

Superlite27
December 26, 2007, 01:27 PM
You can make a gun out of thick walled PVC that will shoot( once) with black powder

I can make one out of styrofoam that will shoot once.

I can probably make a gun out of a pop-tart box that will shoot once.

They will probably blow up and kill whoever shoots them, but I can make a gun out of just about anything that will shoot once.

RTFM
December 26, 2007, 01:28 PM
Ibtl

Lucky
December 26, 2007, 01:43 PM
Ash, 16" cannons on battleships are excellent examples of guns.

I thought that too, but was strongly corrected, those are 16" rifles, boy.

Kruzr
December 26, 2007, 01:48 PM
Lots of people build their own guns from scratch.
Take a look:
http://www.homegunsmith.com/cgi-bin/ib3/ikonboard.cgi?;act=SF;f=30

Cannonball888
December 26, 2007, 01:52 PM
16" cannons on battleships are excellent examples of guns.

I thought that too, but was strongly corrected, those are 16" rifles, boy
They are indeed guns due to their trajectory. They happen to be rifled guns, aka rifles.

Ash
December 30, 2007, 08:19 PM
I have a good friend who served in the US Navy in WWII, went on to become a dentist and retired with a bunch of money. He had friends in the Navy who, upon his retirement, presented him with two 16" projectiles. They are giant, of course, and very heavy. Sure, I've seen them before on the USS Alabama and other ships which fired that projectile, but I have not met a man who actually owned two of them. He originally explained the Naval Gun to me.

One can argue semantics, but a good way to look at it is this. Those big cannons are Naval Rifles - but are also guns.

A Naval Rifle (16") is by definition a Gun. It is not a howitzer nor a mortar but a gun. A gun is not necessarily a Naval Rifle but a Naval Rifle is a Gun. A Chevy Silvarado is by definition a truck, but a truck is not necessarily a Silvarado.

Ash

biscuitninja
December 30, 2007, 08:45 PM
I've built guns before... just read my signature! Unfortuantely unless you want to completely oblerate ANY backdrop you have, they are not quite tactical. Also they aren't exactly cheap or easy to make. I did draw up some plans on a tester .50 cal weapon to use with specialized guided projectles, but again, its not cheap or easy to produce.

Anyways why would you want to? Anything of decent quality isn't going to be cheap or easy to produce.

good uck
-bix

Grizzly Adams
December 30, 2007, 08:59 PM
I've built rifles from actions (M96s & 98s, Rem 788), barrels, and stocks. Took a Super Blackhawk 44 Mag. and built a 45LC with a Douglas premium air gauged barrel.

renaissance
December 30, 2007, 10:59 PM
This "fella" I knew when I was Young...... :O)
built "Zip" Guns.

No One I knew ever used one to do harm
but we all thought we were "Cool Dudes" to have them around.

I'm sure the statute of limitations mjust have run out.
This was in Boston in the 1940s

"He" was inspired by "The Amboy Dukes"
and really got quite inventive.

Went so far as to "Convert" a standard "Cap Gun" of the day.
The kind that used "rolls" of caps - and had a "Top Break"

Jammed a brass tube (with 22 cal shell casing internal diameter)
into the cap gun barrel and reinforced it with wrapped copper wire.
Cut a slit into the "ramp" the the coll of caps slid up
(It served as a "breech block)
Drilled a hole in the hammer and inserted a nail for a firing pin.

You could actually got it to light off by pulling the capgun trigger.
You loaded it the same way you would insert a roll of caps

One such unit was known to fire a half dozen 22 short rounds
and still hang together for more.

Anybody out there old enough to remember those simpler days.
For all the rough edges, the world was a safer place then than it is now.

renaissance

dstark
December 30, 2007, 11:04 PM
There is a homeless guy in our town that my friends and I used to bs with every once in awhile, last time I saw him he only had three fingers on his right hand. I found out later he tried to make a homemade gun using a 12ga shotgun shell.

scalper
June 14, 2008, 11:44 AM
I built a pretty nice muzzle loading 20 gauge shotgun that is a real beauty.

I really find this topic fascinating, but unfortunately it always seem to draw a ton of criticism and misinformation. As I read the topic from the top, I see very little contribution to discussion to what the thread author intended, that is, discussion of homemade firearms. Please remember that most of the folks on this board are fine people - that is safe and responsible. They are not 12 year olds attempting to do something foolish.

My two cents. In most states, there is nothing illegal about manufacturing a firearm for personal use, provided it is one that you could otherwise buy. It is perfectly safe to do, as long as you are careful and complete testing prior to handling.

That said, I will post pictures of my beauty soon. It has been tested at double the normal charge prior to handling. It is a double-barreled, black powder muzzle loading shotgun that has two triggers which use an electrical ignition system (with 9 volt battery). I found this gave me a nice and light trigger pull and allowed me to implement some ideas I had been thinking about for some time. The stock is a bit "boxy" looking, owing to my lack of ability to shape the wood, but it does have a nice finish. With the barrels it uses, it is something between a 16 and 20 gauge, probably closer to the twenty. I had developed custom shells made for it as well. I hadn't thought about this topic for a while, but when I saw it, I figured I needed to chime in and let those with interest know that it is legal, and can be safe and fun. That said, just test the gun a good five times at a charge of twice the norm. Then inspect the weapon for signs of any damage. If it looks good, you are good to go.

Again, I will most likely induce a flame here nor do I mean any disrespect, but please remember what the author of the thread intended, a discussion of homemade firearms. If you find the thread ridiculous, repulsive, or uninteresting, please seek a thread more to your liking.

gym
June 15, 2008, 12:56 AM
I seen to remember about 50 years ago, zip guns were frequentlly made using a car antenna a piece of wood and a nail with a hinge and a rubber band. since most cars don't have antenna's and kids can usually get a real gun easy enough the demand has gone away.

230RN
June 15, 2008, 03:12 AM
I agree about the business of stifling possible arms and ammunition developments by civilians -- I have in mind "Carbine WIlliams," a convicted felon.

From:

http://faceprint.com/~walpd/gen/moore/carbine_williams.htm


Williams, David Marshall (Carbine), 1900-1975

Carbine Williams was born in Cumberland County, eldest of seven children. As a young boy, he worked on his family's farm. He dropped out of school after eighth grade and began work in a blacksmith shop, enjoyed a short stint in Navy, but was discharged because he was underage. After returning from the Navy, he spent one semester at Blackstone Military Academy before being expelled.

In 1918, he married Margaret Cook and they later had one child, David Marshall, Jr. Williams worked for Atlantic Coast Line railroad, but on the side he had an illegal distillery near Godwin, North Carolina. During a raid on this still in 1921, the Deputy Sheriff was shot to death, and Williams was charged with first degree murder. The trial ended in a hung jury, but Williams decided to plead guilty to a lesser charge of second degree murder. He was given a 20-30 year sentence.

While serving time at Caledonia State Prison in Halifax County, the superintendent began to observe in him a certain genius. As a child he had shown a talent for fashioning objects with his hands and as an adolescent had a special interest in guns.

In prison, he would save paper and pencils and stay up late at night drawing plans for various firearms. He was assigned to the prison's machine shop where he repaired the weapons for the guards. His extraordinary skills in the machine shop permitted him to stay ahead of his assignments and allowed him time for his own hobby. He began building lathes and other tools, and then parts for guns. His mother sent him technical data on guns and also provided him with contacts with patent attorneys. While in prison, he invented the short-stroke piston and the floating chamber principles that eventually revolutionized small-arms manufacture.

The family started a campaign to commute his sentence and they were joined by the sheriff to whom he had surrendered and the widow of the man he was accused of killing. Governor McLean reduced the sentence and in 1929 Williams left prison.

Back in Cumberland County, he set to work perfecting his inventions. After two years, he went to Washington, DC to show his work to the War Department. He got his first contract to modify the .30 caliber Brownings to fire .22 caliber smokeless ammunition.

It was the use of his short-stroke piston in the M-1 Carbine manufactured by Winchester and others, that brought his greatest fame and his nickname "Carbine Williams." General Douglas MacArthur called his light rapid-fire carbine "one of the strongest contributing factors in our victory in the Pacific."

In 1952 Jimmy Steward portrayed Carbine Williams in a movie of the same name. He spent his last years in Godwin after some time in Connecticut. He died in Godwin, North Carolina in 1975.

1999 ncstuff.com


If I am not mistaken, the Colt "Ace" .22 conversion unit for the 1911 (and similar .22 systems) are all derived from his floating chamber principle.

Can you imagine a felon being able to develop these systems today?

.cheese.
June 15, 2008, 11:06 AM
what about a zip gun? That would be classified as AOW though wouldn't it and therefore NFA?

akodo
June 15, 2008, 09:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkDf-mkZ4uk&feature=related

that is the techniue used in this weapon
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8458&d=1037641578

and the above gun just needs to be made with a long enough barrel and stock to not be a SBS or AOW

this is why gun control will never work

.cheese.
June 15, 2008, 09:37 PM
oh ok. For some reason I thought the lack of a stock or grip would make it an AOW. I need to reread the law obviously.

gym
June 16, 2008, 10:29 AM
I always wanted a walking stick, similar to that homemade shotgun in the utube shown. It would be a handy weapon, in certain situations. Perhaps with a swival on the handle so as to reload quicklly.

EShell
June 16, 2008, 10:39 AM
Some of you guys oughta be locked up just for being so crazy paranoid - with an attitude like that, I just KNOW you've gotta be up to something, LOL. :evil:

Bad enough to have to comply with the fourteen gazillion un-Constitutional laws out there, and their arbitrary enforcement, let alone invent your own imaginary constraints. :banghead:

I have built several of my own firearms (gasp!):
http://www.mdshooters.com/showthread.php?t=4197

jackstinson
June 16, 2008, 10:40 AM
Someday I'd love to meet the genius that figured out a car radio antenna is a perfect barrel for a .22.
Oil line from a 1955 BSA motorcycle works quite well also.
I built quite a few cartridge firearms (and black powder guns) from scratch many years ago. Just to see what I could make. I have no need to these days, but perhaps in the future? At least I know I can if the need arises. Basic firearms take very little by way of tools to make. And the standard guerrilla warfare pipe shotgun can be slapped together quicker than you can say "insurrection".

crushbup
June 16, 2008, 11:06 AM
Everyone here should be aware that you can sell guns you make for yourself. There are two requirements, however:
1) The gun must not have been made for sale, but for personal use
2) It has a serial number and other markings the ATF requires.

Basically, if you made a gun today and ten years from now you don't want it anymore, you can sell it as long as it is marked properly.

learn2shoot
June 16, 2008, 11:54 AM
Can you imagine a felon being able to develop these systems today?

...while IN prison!!

bogie
June 16, 2008, 01:11 PM
Well, I have three rifles where I know EVERYONE who had a hand in producing the components which went into their construction.

I could build one myself - just probably not as nice.

MD_Willington
June 16, 2008, 02:39 PM
When I was younger, and in a foreign country, we built all kinds of things.

Dravur
June 16, 2008, 04:34 PM
a working bazooka in high school. The rockets worked.... not terribly accurate, nor powerful, but tons of fun.

bnkrazy
June 16, 2008, 07:39 PM
I know someone that builds AK pistols. I'd like to get into it but lack the equipment to make it easy and have a decent final product.

230RN
June 16, 2008, 07:54 PM
I was interested in producing ammo from scratch and reloading brass and primers using commonly available materials (e.g., strike-anywhere matcheads.)

Worked, but poorly, and the cartridges stunk like heck.

I also made .243 bullets from .22Mag cases.

I've also made .357 bullets out of .30 Carbine cases.

SDC
June 16, 2008, 08:08 PM
The simplest "home-made" (actually PRISON-made) gun I've ever seen was made with:
a Coke can
a bag of Lays potato chips
a pack of matches
a scrap of wire about 3" long
a scrap of steel wool the size of your pinkie nail
and 2 AA batteries
When put together, this thing would blow a hole the size of your thumb through corrugated tin siding.

rickomatic
June 16, 2008, 11:57 PM
Everyone here should be aware that you can sell guns you make for yourself. There are two requirements, however:
1) The gun must not have been made for sale, but for personal use
2) It has a serial number and other markings the ATF requires.

Basically, if you made a gun today and ten years from now you don't want it anymore, you can sell it as long as it is marked properly.

Threads of this type come and go from time to time.
I am NOT a lawyer, and this is only my educated opinion. But my understanding is that the "serial number" and "marked properly" requirements apply to LICENSED MANUFACTURES only. It is SUGGESTED that you mark a homemade firearm should you decide to sell it, but is is not a requirement.
If I am mistaken then please show me chapter and verse in any Federal Law, or BATF edict or letter to the contrary, and I will stand corrected
The problem is that there are so many firearms laws, and they are all so confusing, that these kinds of misunderstandings are bound to happen.

1776 Rebel
June 17, 2008, 07:12 AM
I believe I read at some point that the courts found you could build a firearm for yourself but you can not transport across state lines without getting the ATF involved. If it stays in the state of manufacture its fine. But do check with a lawyer first, then the ATF.

scalper
July 3, 2008, 01:05 PM
You can make a gun out of thick walled PVC that will shoot( once) with black powder.

What an interesting idea. A disposable gun. Since we have diapers, pop bottles, cameras, and many other throw-away items, why not a gun. Then you don't have to even worry about cleaning the darn thing. :D

Reddbecca
July 3, 2008, 01:09 PM
Anybody have a homemade gun?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v444/hasanbeensober/Guns/Projects/Jackaljoshua.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v444/hasanbeensober/Guns/Projects/Mac10d.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v444/hasanbeensober/Guns/Projects/Raven3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v444/hasanbeensober/Guns/Projects/1911.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v444/hasanbeensober/Guns/Projects/P226F.jpg

Madison_ultralight
July 3, 2008, 01:23 PM
What's the dowel? an unfinished trigger lock?

Reddbecca
July 3, 2008, 02:00 PM
It's there for the same reason people put a live cartridge through the trigger guard; to prop the gun up at an angle.

NeoSpud
July 3, 2008, 02:08 PM
Reddbecca- are those first two handguns from Hellsing?

paintballdude902
July 3, 2008, 02:36 PM
made a potato howitzer last summer

a 5ft gas chamber and a 10ft barrel launched a potato half way accross the river which is about a mile

took alot of starter fluid though

Reddbecca
July 3, 2008, 02:37 PM
Yes they are, the Joshua and the Jackal. They're built just slightly bigger than scale.

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