How do you retrieve pistol brass at the range?


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archerben
December 27, 2007, 01:51 PM
I recently purchased a 9mm and and considering tooling up to reload it. My question is, how do you retrieve your brass when shooting in an indoor range? Or do you just leave it and buy more brass? Also, how many times can expect to be able to reload 9mm brass when shooting less than max loads?

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Snapping Twig
December 27, 2007, 01:58 PM
I don't have a 9mm, but I do have several brass flingers and I pick up the brass.

Typically there is a broom to help you retrieve relatively close brass beyond the firing line at indoor ranges.

You can mark the heads of your brass with a Sharpie if you like, makes it easy to segregate yours from range brass.

You can reload low pressure rounds in the same brass for years. You can reload high pressure rounds in the same brass for only slightly less time. When the case mouth cracks, toss it. Do not save brass fired in certain Glock models as the case head is not fully supported and it could lead to problems when reloaded and fired.

Walkalong
December 27, 2007, 02:33 PM
How do you retrieve pistol brass at the range?
One at at time on tired old knees and an aching back. :D

Dave P
December 27, 2007, 02:46 PM
extend arm
lean over
grab brass
place in container


repeat until back says "NO MORE"


Revolvers get more fun as you get older!

TexasSkyhawk
December 27, 2007, 02:48 PM
I bring a small bag with me in my gun bag and pick up my brass and put it in the bag. When shooting the wheelguns, I just put the spent brass back into the plastic reload boxes--easier to keep calibres separated that way.

When someone is shooting next to me, I'll ask them if they reload or if they're keeping their brass. When they (usually) answer "No," then I pick it up for them and put it in the bag.

Keeps the poor rangemaster from having to sweep up so much loose brass.

Jeff

mjrodney
December 27, 2007, 02:51 PM
With one of these....for catching my own brass.....

http://www.cm-machine.com/item.jhtml;$sessionid$JRJLDIYAABJ0RTZENUGXBMWPERWRJPX0?UCIDs=6006%7C6007&PRID=97882

armoredman
December 27, 2007, 02:52 PM
Way to be a good neighbor, Texas! Back when I worked at an indoor range, before we saved brass, I would go so far as to hand a plastic baggie to reloaders looking for brass, and tell 'em, "load up!"

K3
December 27, 2007, 03:19 PM
TexasSkyhawk, that IS very nice of you.

You have set an example that I shall follow in 2008. Our rangemaster looks tired, and I think he needs some help! :D

Guy B. Meredith
December 27, 2007, 03:32 PM
For the revolver it's a no brainer. For the M1 Garand it's another thing. This thread reminds me I need to check in on a brass catcher mentioned elsewhere.

K3
December 27, 2007, 03:40 PM
There's a guy that frequents the range I use that built himself a cool brass catcher for his ARs and other semi-autos. It's just some PVC and netting material. I think he spent $20 on materials. It looks like all that is needed is one length of pipe, a handful of elbows, and some cloth mesh type material. I don't even think he glued the joints together. Makes it easy to disassemble and store.

archerben
December 27, 2007, 03:41 PM
If you haven't gathered yet, I'm pretty new to the pistol sports, and mostly didn't know if it was common for the indoor ranges to allow you to retrieve brass. I would really like to become profficient with a handgun, so I'm trying to determine the costs of reloading vs. buying the cheap walmart stuff, as well value of the various membership fees at the local range. I currently load bottleneck cartridges via a single stage press. I will most likely buy a set of dies for the 9mm and start loading them with what I've got with the future option of upgrading to a progressive press if I shoot enough to warrant it. I must admit, a progressive press would be nice for the .223 as well.

By the way, thank you for all of the responses.

lee n. field
December 27, 2007, 03:56 PM
One at at time on tired old knees and an aching back.

Pick it up, put it in the bag. Rinse, lather, repeat.

Zeke/PA
December 27, 2007, 04:07 PM
A revolver shooter at our club is very extravagant.
Recently, in about a half hour, I picked up over 400 once fired Federal .38 special empties.
I guess there was some fast combat style shooting going on as the brass was less than 10 yards from the backstop on a particular range.
Zeke

AirplaneDoc
December 27, 2007, 04:28 PM
I take a 30 cal ammo can (the skinny one) to the range with me, I use it for range pickups. What I can sort out of my own, I place back in the container, I brought it in. Anyhing else I can find goes in the 30 cal can. I generallly shoot at a outdoor range, so I have a piece of bulk screen rolled around a pvc pipe that I clamp to the roof beams. Muzzle blast, and noise passes thru, brass stays more or less confined to my area.

bobaloo
December 27, 2007, 04:34 PM
I NEVER try to pick up 9mm brass, and yet I have 3 5-gallon buckets full of it. It just seems to magically appear when I'm picking up other brass.

Brass has been pretty thin at the range the last year or so, more scroungers and more reloaders. If you want brass look for a scheduled IPSC match or full-auto shoot and be there when it ends, or better yet police or security company training. Last year picked up 2000 Federal .45 +P nickle cases shortly after they were fired when a local security guard company did their annual qualifications.

herohog
December 27, 2007, 04:44 PM
I used to shoot at the Sheriff's range and I picked up the brass they left behind. I have more 9mm than I know what to do with now! .38spl too!

scrat
December 27, 2007, 05:30 PM
you need a brass catcher

possum
December 27, 2007, 05:34 PM
i bend down and pick it up. if i am at an indoor range the one near the house they have brooms and dust pan and i sweep it up, and i normally take all the brass that i use ie. 40, .45 etc even if i didn't shoot it it is no need for it to go to waste.

sometimes at out door ranges it isn't required and sometimes i leave it. there is a range back home where an old man comes aroud everyday and picksup all the brass from all the pits and sorts it out and sells it and thats his thng so i normally leave it for him. thats what he likes to do so i liketo help the guy out you know.

trickyasafox
December 27, 2007, 06:15 PM
I pick em up by hand, how else can you scour the brass that was previously left behind :)

i don't separate my brass until i tumble it, which is when i get the 5 gal bucket full, or run low enough on calibers to bother starting it up. I used to tumble after every range trip, but my lead levels got slightly elevated and i suspect that was the cause. (no evidence here, just a hunch)

so i've been cutting down on my tumbling this year to see if it helps.

evan price
December 27, 2007, 07:59 PM
I take an empty plastic 1-gallon bucket or else a shoulder bag with me to the range, and leave a 5-gallon bucket in the truck to dump into if there's a lot of brass.
Then, it's bend over and pick up one at a time in the outdoor range. Knee pads and advil are your friend.
The indoor range I use a push broom and a snow shovel and dump right into 5-gallon buckets.

.38 Special
December 27, 2007, 09:15 PM
A word of friendly advice, if you haven't already thought of it: make sure, if you're picking up brass that didn't come from your gun, that you aren't "stealing" brass from a fellow shooter who simply hasn't picked it up yet.

Black_Talon
December 27, 2007, 09:17 PM
I have a very bad back, and use one of these (http://www.arthritissupplies.com/site/371928/product/ADM1777). The one I have was about $7 from Harbor Freight Tools. It's got ridged rubber pads on the end which makes it super-easy to pickup brass, no matter what orientation you grab it in.

Rustynuts
December 27, 2007, 09:49 PM
Pick it up, put it in the bag. Rinse, lather, repeat.

I think you'll have better results if you lather BEFORE rinsing! :neener:

cmidkiff
December 28, 2007, 11:41 AM
Just grab your brass magnet and go to it ;)


That's why I only reload for revolver and bolt guns, but that's the majority of what I shoot. I shoot steel cased ammo from my .223 and .308 autoloader rifles. I do leave 50-100 once fired Winchester .45acp cases laying on the ground when I go to the range... I'm sure someone is happy to have it. My knees are back are worth far more to this gray bearded fatman than the brass is.

The Bushmaster
December 28, 2007, 02:04 PM
Like most people. I bend over and pick it up. The heavy ones I do get on my knees first. Or if I plan to be there a while I will get on my knees...I pick up all brass and sort it when I get home.

Eric F
December 28, 2007, 02:23 PM
try this shoot 38 super when every one else shoots 9mm. Now your having fun finding brass!

Jayb
December 28, 2007, 02:31 PM
I take a king sized sheet and lay it on the ground. The brass lands on the sheet, and I just shake it to the middle, then pour it onto a plastic bucket.

Luggernut
December 28, 2007, 10:32 PM
Interesting discussion. Just yesterday I went to the range to do some shooting with my 1911. Since I reload I usually inspect the spent brass to see how it looks. I shoot a little, then pick up (hands and knees), shoot a little more, pick up, etc. Well there were a bunch of older guys with some teenage girls shooting .22s. When they were finishing up the girls started sweeping away my .45 cases! :eek: I was surprised the guys didn't say anything but since I was the only other person at the range.. I just grabbed them from the brass bucket after when they left.

Anyways- I go on my hands and knees and will pick up all the decent 9mm, .40S&W and .45ACP brass I can find... occasionally others as well. I have piles of 9mm and .40... but not so much .45... seems like EVERYONE saves .45 brass these days. I'll take as much as I can get too... makes it less painful when I lose brass at a match.

jrou111
December 29, 2007, 02:23 AM
I paid for the ammo - brass case and all, so I'm taking it with me! Any brass that it left by shooters that don't cleanup - I take it. As long as it's not in the barrel. I even take .22 and steel cases. Even berdan primed.

If it's metal - then it has value. I have hundreds of 38, 9mm, 40, and 45acp, and I don't even own a gun in that caliber - but I know one day I probably will. I keep them all separated in plastice bags. Anything not reloadable I put into a "brass," "aluminium," or "steel" bucket because scrap brass is $1.50/lb, aluminium is $ .80/lb, and steel is $.05/lb (steel is also the heaviest, and I have scrap bins from welding and plasma cutting)

wworker
December 29, 2007, 04:59 AM
and I don't even own a gun in that caliber

I can relate to that. I've been picking up .45 ACP brass too, but don't have a pistol for it yet.

I guess I need to buy one. :)



In my Lyman reloading manual, there is a caution that says this:

"Never use cartridge cases from an unknown source, i.e. cases picked up at the range or sold as once fired brass. Use only new brass or cases obtained as the result of firing factory ammo in your firearm."


Is this a liability issue for this statement in their manual?

If a case is picked up at the range and upon inspection seems suitable for reloading, why not use it?

bl4ckd0g
December 29, 2007, 06:29 PM
It's a legalese CYA statement. Most of my .45 ACP ammo is loaded into once fired range pickups. It shouldn't be a big deal if you're handloading moderately-powered loads into inspected brass.

Brass for low pressure loads seems to last through quite a few reloadings.

On the other hand, beat up .223 Rem casings with sizing marks go into the scrap bin.

wworker
December 30, 2007, 07:28 AM
Yeah, it seems a common sense inspection is a good idea. :)

I noticed many .223 cases are slightly dented (but not punctured) on the body during ejection from semi autos, probably AR-15s or M4s.

Are slightly dented bodies an issue or will these spring back (fire form) upon firing after a reload?

Also, another general question on any caliber, are slightly bent necks an issue or will the resizing die take care of those too?

Darth Muffin
December 30, 2007, 02:52 PM
My indoor range doesn't let you go ahead of the firing line (don't blame them, I wouldn't want to anyhow!), but they do have brooms. I sweep all the previous brass as far out of the way as I can (including the neighboring stalls if unused) before I shoot, then sweep up all of mine that I can reach with the broom. That usually gets 75% of it, some will bounce downrange out of reach.

woodfiler
December 30, 2007, 03:02 PM
at my club its required you sweep up your brass and keep it, or put it in
one of the clubs 5 gallon pails, once in the pail you can take it.


wood

Rustynuts
December 30, 2007, 07:11 PM
I'm surprised some ranges don't try and prohibit it due to the scrap value. They could always come up with some "safety" regulation to prevent it. Have to read my range rules next time. I've never noticed anyone picking brass there.

herohog
December 30, 2007, 07:14 PM
Been at that range... refused to go back. That brass that I dropped belongs to ME.

ForneyRider
January 3, 2008, 04:28 PM
Make sure you ask before you pick it up.

The ranges I have been to here in Texas allow me to pick up any of the brass that is left.

I try to grab all I can. I figure I will find someone needing it eventually.

Weatherby's are cool looking. Okay, I am a dork.

There are brass catchers. I've seen the AR-15 guys use them. And appreciate when they do. It is better than it flying down my shirt. And I was 2 lanes over.

If you don't have one, get a nice range bag. Then put some bags in it for brass. That way you can get out of the way more quickly.

JohnMcD348
January 3, 2008, 11:02 PM
The range I frequent has a few brooms and dust pans available. I try to go in the early morning before to many shooters arrive. I'll just carry a few ziplocks with me and when I go to the range, I sweep it up and dump it in the baggies.

jmorris
January 4, 2008, 12:26 AM
http://www.baganut.com/ works pretty good if you have to cover a large area.

ARTJR338WM
January 5, 2008, 12:15 AM
Has anyone thought of giving as portable battery powerd vac a try? I am seeing these more and more now at places like Home Depot for job site use. I guess i will try one. With a long skinny solid tube attachment I doubt you would even have to bend over to do the work.

brickeyee
January 5, 2008, 03:19 PM
Carrying a vac would only decease the amount of ammo I can carry.

Of course I have carried CO2 cylinders to cool off barrels a tthe outdoor range.
luckily parking is very close.
About 20 feet.

longtooth
January 5, 2008, 03:38 PM
If you will ask about the brass policy at the range you shoot at most but not all will let you pick up your own brass.

I have had several tell me I can clean up all I want for it as long as I do not bother any shooter or get in front of the firing line.

jeepmor
January 5, 2008, 06:13 PM
Are slightly dented bodies an issue or will these spring back (fire form) upon firing after a reload?

Also, another general question on any caliber, are slightly bent necks an issue or will the resizing die take care of those too?

1. slightly dented will fireform fine, just make sure it's not a crease that could cause a split.

2. If the neck resizes fine, then use it, if not, then don't. I have had some necks stepped on where they would not fit into the resizer die. I used a small tool to work out the case mouth dent, then ran it through the FL resizing process and it looked fine, so I used it.

I bend over and pick it up. I have been really fortunate to find .223 shooters of late who don't mind leaving piles of Lake City brass laying around. Good stuff. I think I got 200 or 300 on one range trip alone. I always ask others if scrounging their brass is okay. And my neighbor doesn't reload so he saves oodles of .223 for me also. If they're not picking it up after a magazine or two, then I move in and ask if I can scrounge it.

hawkeye1
January 7, 2008, 08:52 AM
I hang up an old blanket on my right side from the rafter when I am at the range. Most of my brass hits the blanket and falls to the floor in a pile. That way it does not bounce and roll all over the line. Easy retrieval.

for my AR I picked up a brass catcher that fits under the carrying handle. It catches all brass and is completeely out of the way. It is the hard plastic type not the net. It is absolutely the best thing I have ever bought for that gun.

http://www.brasscatchers.com/store/brasscatcher.html

Check out this website. It is definitely worth look.

bertus
January 7, 2008, 09:05 AM
I made a brasscatcher out of a speer bullet box and attached it to my gun with velcro strips

offroaddiver
January 7, 2008, 11:12 PM
I have done alot of picking up by hand. I'm planning to buy some new knee pads... especially since i made a nice little circle bruise on my knee when kneeling straight down on a case. My range bag is more along the lines of a shotgunners bag. Has a mesh side that has a zipper so you can dump into a bucket. I'm also planning on getting a couple of small bags or using the spring up buckets.

jcwit
January 8, 2008, 12:22 PM
I made a simple brass catcher from a fish net with a 5 ft. handle. Cut about 16" from the handle and I put it length wise into the net, [holds it open] used a short of 2 X 4 with a hole in it to hold net with balance of handle attached. Saw cut with cross bolt & wing nut grips handle. C clamp holds whole assbly to bench, no chance of blowing over. Total cost $12. Wish I knew how to post pics, but this is pretty simple.

CoRoMo
January 8, 2008, 02:06 PM
...king sized sheet and lay it on the ground.

Good idea. that will have to be my new method.
I shoot at a range that is on public land and is nothing close to organized.
Everyone just picks a hill and shoots into it and leaves their brass, shot shells, broken beer bottles, shot-up targets, and unwanted furniture right out there on the prairie. Pathetic.

I was thinking about taking a rake out there, but it would have to have tight spaces between the tines to catch ever shell. I bet I could spend a day out there picking up brass and take it in to recycling and make enough money to buy my next gun.

Is there not a type of rake that would do that??

jarhead
January 8, 2008, 05:27 PM
I ordered a "nut-wizard" on Ebay, it's made for picking up acorns and such... rolling cage on the end of a broom handle and you just roll it over the ground and it picks up all the empty shell casings... it'll hold a couple of handfuls before I have to empty it in a bucket and then roll it over the ground again. Works well for me in short grass, on concrete or dirt lanes... my poor back couldn't handle the constant bending over...

evan price
January 8, 2008, 06:43 PM
Unfortunately the outdoor range at our club is gravelled so it won't work.

I have a large bar magnet screwed to a push broom and it works great for the Wolf steel case junk to keep it under control. Goes right into my scrap steel bin.

RyanM
January 8, 2008, 06:53 PM
I squat down, make wings with my arms, and quack like a duck as I waddle around picking up the brass. :D

Deavis
January 8, 2008, 07:24 PM
I got a net from a netting company and had them sew on a few loops at the top. I bought a few magnets with hooks on them. I attach the loops to the magnets and place the magnets on the steel supports at our range. I then lay out the excess netting near my ffet and shhot away. End of the day I sweep what didn't land on the netting onto the net, shake to remove dirt, pour into a bucket, fold up my net, and leave. Works great.

rondog
January 8, 2008, 07:25 PM
"I ordered a "nut-wizard" on Ebay, it's made for picking up acorns and such... rolling cage on the end of a broom handle and you just roll it over the ground and it picks up all the empty shell casings... it'll hold a couple of handfuls before I have to empty it in a bucket and then roll it over the ground again. Works well for me in short grass, on concrete or dirt lanes... my poor back couldn't handle the constant bending over..."

That thing work pretty good? What size do you have, I see there's three sizes of 'em..... I know of an outdoor public range where the brass on the ground is like gravel pavement. I've often wondered about the scrap value per pound of spent brass, if you can gather up enough of it.

BAT1
January 8, 2008, 11:15 PM
I do while the barrels cool. The guys don't have to sweep after me.

scout26
January 8, 2008, 11:24 PM
Kitty litter scoop also works well, but you still have to bend over, unless you attach it to a pole somehow.

wuchak
January 8, 2008, 11:27 PM
Open cylinder and push extractor over the coffee can.

hawkeye1
January 10, 2008, 02:50 PM
know what you mean wuchak. I am liking my revolvers more and more. much easier to police the area when I am done.

toughmandave
March 1, 2009, 03:47 PM
You can Google Brass Wizard or go to www.uniquetek.com Brass Wizard sells for $44.00. It's like a roller on a broom stick. You roll it across the ground in front of you and is picks up all the brass in its cage. Then you just dump out the brass into a container. Picks up most all brass, rifle and handgun. That's it. No dirty hands anymore or dusty knees. Uniquetek also has other unusual loading tools.

Hungry Seagull
March 1, 2009, 03:51 PM
I try to account for all ammuntion fired.

The Sharpie tip is a helpful one.

Knees, back and gather brass that I or spouse fired. It goes into the brass can or other container as directed by the RO.

But I try to clear my booth before firing, dont want to slip on the stuff.

The Bushmaster
March 1, 2009, 05:02 PM
I a regulation "Brass Rat"...You can't find it, I have it...I do ask the others if they are saving their brass. If not...You will find me on my hands and knees in amungst the other legs collecting brass. I have no pride...But I do have a lot of brass...

RustyFN
March 1, 2009, 07:19 PM
I shoot at a club I belong to and they have six outdoor pistol bays and a 300 yard rifle range. There is no easy way to get the brass at the pistol range because I end up shooting over a big area so even a tarp is way too small. I end up just having to walk around and pick it up.Here is a picture of one bay as an example.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9dc07b3127ccec6201510e05f00000040O00DZOGblm4Yg9vPhI/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

I a regulation "Brass Rat"...You can't find it, I have it...I do ask the others if they are saving their brass. If not...You will find me on my hands and knees in amungst the other legs collecting brass. I have no pride...But I do have a lot of brass...
:D I can relate to that Bushmaster.

Hungry Seagull
March 1, 2009, 07:24 PM
....edited....I will be happy to pile em up over time. Otherwise the range gets it for whatever I hope it will be a local reloader that can use em.

I have a sufficient number of PM's to support brass without sending too few...

Claude Clay
March 1, 2009, 07:36 PM
brass from my cz52 is often snagged by the pilots on approach

Jumping Frog
March 1, 2009, 08:46 PM
I bring my sons to the range.

They earn the privilege of shooting by picking up the brass.

That will last about another 5 years, and then I'll have to go back to hands and knees.

SciFiJim
March 1, 2009, 09:04 PM
At the outdoor range I shoot at you are allowed to pick up your own brass but must leave the rest. There is a guy that cleans the range once a week in exchange for the brass that he collects. Seems like a good trade to keep costs down for the range; but it makes it hard for us new reloaders to accumulate supplies on the cheap. However I do get the empty boxes and shell trays from the trash. I especially like the CCI and Blaser brand of boxes because they fit sideways in my 30 cal ammo box.

Black_Talon
March 3, 2009, 10:28 PM
In post #22 of this thread I posted a link to the grabber that I use, but the link is no longer alive after all these years, so here's a newer link:

http://www.arthritissupplies.com/site/371928/product/ADM177

Works great, and costs only around $7 at Harbor Freight Chinatools.

shaggy430
March 3, 2009, 10:58 PM
I pick up 9, 40, and 45 even though right now I only have a 9. I can justify to myself (and my wife) buying a 1911 and a .40 XD when I get 1000 rounds of each.

At our range there are not a lot of pistol reloaders so I get funny looks when I'm crawling around.

Most rifle shooters are more than happy to save their brass for you. All you have to do is ask.

WV_Vizsla
March 3, 2009, 11:35 PM
I have used a generator and shop vac twice after major IDPA shoots. Filled holes in the driveway with the gravel - LOL! Way better than bending over for 2+ hours or more. HAD TO buy a 45 last year to use some 45 brass
Will be ordering a brass wizard, wish the Ammo-up was not $395

RustyFN: Where is that WV range?
We shoot IDPA @ MDRC in morgantown first Saturdays, great folks

D. Manley
March 3, 2009, 11:44 PM
I usually carry 2-gallon zip lock bags. When possible, I scarf up the range pickings into one bag before ever firing a shot. I use the other bag to hold my fired brass. Retrieval on my range is a nasty affair...floor is literally covered with residue and when finished, hands are black. I sometimes use the facility's broom and dust-pan but to avoid all the other unwanted litter, I usually just do it the old fashioned way. I carry a little flat container of "wet-wipes" and usually go through quite a few. And FWIW, I am sick of processing brass...I just loaded about 500 or so using my "bottom feeder" brass to drop and leave next trip, I need a break.

luis7
March 4, 2009, 03:16 AM
Hello.
Of course I do.
I retrieve mines and shooter guys non reloaders.
I have a homemade brass catcher from a fish net for 10 $ and now I havenīt my blacks fingers to dusty floor.
I have around 4000 9mm brass in my garage all shiny, 2000 32 SW long and 300 357 magnun too.
I like to see a full brass range floor to caught its.
Greetings from Spain.

Walkalong
March 4, 2009, 08:42 AM
I usually carry 2-gallon zip lock bagsI have two little bags that hang off of my range bag, a big poly type bag with a tie on it, and a tape reinforced box I keep in the back seat. Sometimes I spend more time picking up brass than shooting. I am glad a lot of shooters are getting into reloading lately, and welcome them, but there will always be some who leave us their brass, thanks goodness.

oneounceload
March 4, 2009, 10:35 AM
You can reload low pressure rounds in the same brass for years. You can reload high pressure rounds in the same brass for only slightly less time. When the case mouth cracks, toss it. Do not save brass fired in certain Glock models as the case head is not fully supported and it could lead to problems when reloaded and fired.

I've been reloading my brass and range brass for years in my G17 with zero problems. In fact the reason I bought the 17 instead of the then-new 40S&W, was that I had buckets of 9mm. What problems are you talking about?

Yo2slick
March 4, 2009, 12:59 PM
The indoor range I shoot at allows you to pick up your brass but I dont think they want you to pick up anything else. They sell it in their "reloading dept." I will ask the other shooters if they save their brass and if they dont I ask if I can have it. Other than that, if no one is looking I grab whatever else is on the floor.

lgbloader
March 4, 2009, 01:03 PM
Open cylinder and push extractor over the coffee can.

Amen to that.

LGB

fourdollarbill
March 4, 2009, 02:16 PM
I hand the range master $30 bucks and take two five gallon buckets full of brass and sort them out while drinking a beverage in the back yard. The whole time I'm cussing and saying I will never do this again:banghead:. Then I go back to the range...:confused: and start all over again.

fitz47
March 4, 2009, 04:38 PM
Brass retrival no Problem.Promise your grandchild a trip to the range and put to work

jjohnson
March 5, 2009, 08:29 AM
Absoluteley. Bend over and pick it up.

There are other guys at my range that do the same. My ONLY gripe is that one old fart always brings a bag and never shoots - he just gathers brass. I've seen him downrange often when guys are waiting for him to get out of the lane:fire: so they may commence fire.

Worse, while you're trying to shoot, he'll rummage in the trash barrel right beside you. :cuss: like a raccoon in a garbage can. That's as rude as shooting pics of some guy while he's trying to tee off his golfball.:banghead:

Someday someone might plug him by mistake.

Anyway, I pick up my own brass and anything else that's lying about, but only when I'm the only one in a lane and somebody who collects his brass isn't trying to shoot while I go dumpster diving. If I pick up brass on a firing station, I use a broom and dustpan, so the other crud like .22 casings and cigarette butts are cleaned up.

Some commercial ranges claim any brass on the floor as their own. Others are happy to get the stuff off the floor to keep it clean. Ask whomever is running your range what their policy is. If they want it, they'll tell you so.

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