Ease of Accessing Slide Stop One Handed


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BigMike66
December 31, 2007, 08:25 PM
From my first post regarding 1911 components, I took to heart a posters recommendation and bought an in-expensive (as compared to the majority of 1911s) Kimber Pro Carry. $699 at Sportmans. I reckon I can learn on this, then move up ($$$) as necessary.

So the question:

How important is it to be able to actuate the slide release with the thumb of the right hand still firmly on the grip?

I'm not able to safely move the thumb to release the slide stop due to what I assume is my hand size. I have to rotate my hand to get my thumb on the lever. Is it bad practice to use the free hand to assist? Is there a mod I need to consider. Is there a technique I'm missing?

BTW, same thing with my CZ 75.

TIA

Mike

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Zak Smith
December 31, 2007, 08:32 PM
Of the tactical pistol classes I've taken, the technique taught to release the slide was either:

1. rack the slide overhand with the weak hand (ie, do not touch slide stop)

2. release the slide stop with the weak-side thumb just before achieving new firing grip

AK103K
December 31, 2007, 08:34 PM
Dont feel bad, I never was able to do it either.

You could always just "slingshot" the slide and not worry about it, or use your left thumb to do it.

I was recently told (by a 1911 shooter) that the stops on my SIG's were in the wrong place. Funny, I can drop the slide on any of them with my right thumb and never change my grip. :)

possum
December 31, 2007, 08:36 PM
rack the slide overhand with the weak hand (ie, do not touch slide stop)
thats the way that i train, the onlytime i use the slide stop is when clearing a gun and dissassembly.

Ed Ames
December 31, 2007, 09:02 PM
IMO... the important part is that you are able to engage the slide stop with your thumb. As in no magazine in the gun weak hand has the slide strong hand on the grip and you want to lock the gun open.

So long as you can do that comfortably you are in fine shape.

The Lone Haranguer
December 31, 2007, 09:30 PM
How important is it to be able to actuate the slide release with the thumb of the right hand still firmly on the grip?

Nice, but not critical.

I have a couple of 1911s and do find it somewhat difficult to release the slide with my shooting hand (right) thumb. Smith & Wesson DA pistols are the same way. I usually just rack the slide overhanded or trip the release with my support hand thumb. If I shift my grip quite a bit I can get my right thumb onto the slide stop, so I can do it in a pinch, e.g., if my left hand were injured. You can get extended slide stops for 1911s, but these have been known to bounce upward and engage the slide notch while firing - not good.

tegemu
January 1, 2008, 10:08 AM
I have to shift my grip slightly but very quickly the gun is back in my firing grip (Amost as quickly as the gun is back in battery) - no sweat.

shooter1
January 1, 2008, 10:56 AM
I don't know anyone who uses the thumb of the shooting hand to operate the slide stop. Most trainers now teach the overhand slingshot into battery. I know it goes against the "New" modern technique, but I operate the slide release with my non firing hand while resuming my firing grip after a slide lock reload. I have been beat over the head by trainers with the gross motor skills thing. They assure me that I will not be able to operate the slide stop under stress. Just doesn't make sense that I am expected to operate the mag release and the safety, but somehow won't be able to operate the slide stop. I've carried a 1911 for a lot of years as a LEO. Durring those years, I've been in more than a few stressful situtations, and I found that I disengaged the safety without problems when needed. I am confident I could perform a reload as well if needed, using the slide stop. Ooooops, got a little off topic, sorry.
str1

Double Naught Spy
January 1, 2008, 12:50 PM
Agree, nice but not critical. However, I found that by installing thin grips, I can do it without having to drastically change my grip. It always bothered me to see right-handed guys have to do a mag change by rotating the gun 45-90 degrees left and tilted about 45 degrees up so that they could insert the mag with the weak hand and drop the slide with the thumb of the right hand. Accomplishing this takes the strong hand completely out of its firing grip.

I have been in classes where this was taught. The idea is that the rotated left and up position speeds mag insertion by the off hand and dropping the slide by the strong hand. The problem is that the muzzle is no longer pointed toward the threat and everyone to the left is now down range of the muzzle, even if it is pointed somewhat skyward.

We also installed thin grips on the wife's gun because she could not ride the safety with full thickness grips because of her smaller hands.

So in general, thin grips reduce the grip circumference of the 1911 and generally make all the controls more accessible.

AndyC
January 1, 2008, 01:03 PM
I'm rather tired of "trainers" claiming that "You won't use the sights under stress" or "You won't be able to use the slide-stop", etc. Rubbish - you'll do it if you train properly to do so - you'll get out what you put into it.

Now, for the average, only semi-interested shooter, teach them the failure-free things - train students for the lowest common denominator by all means, but it gets right up my nose when some newly-minted shooter fresh from some arbitrary course does the whole "this is The Way" number on me. I'm a real friendly guy, but nothing will get me to growling faster than that.

For the orginal question of "How important is it to be able to actuate the slide release with the thumb of the right hand still firmly on the grip?" - it doesn't matter. Do what will work for you under stress.

DMK
January 1, 2008, 01:08 PM
I never use a slide catch except to manually lock a slide back. To release the slide I slingshot it.

One method to learn. Works with all guns.

I was recently told (by a 1911 shooter) that the stops on my SIG's were in the wrong place. Funny, I can drop the slide on any of them with my right thumb and never change my grip.I would much, much rather have the safety there, like on 1911s and CZs.

AK103K
January 1, 2008, 01:41 PM
Most of my pistols dont have safeties. :)

Big Boomer
January 1, 2008, 02:09 PM
That's not very safe :(

AK103K
January 1, 2008, 02:35 PM
Why's that?

DMK
January 1, 2008, 02:37 PM
Most of my pistols dont have safeties.Or that. ;)

That's not very safeMost double action guns don't have safeties (ever seen a revolver with a safety?). The long pull and heavier trigger spring prevents the gun from firing unless you deliberately squeeze the trigger.

weisse52
January 1, 2008, 04:32 PM
I use the slide release, cause that is what I have always done. I once in a blue moon rack the slide, but on my 1911's and Glocks I use the slide release.
I do it while a the range, and I do it while competing, and I look at my sights too!

Clipper
January 1, 2008, 05:19 PM
An extended slide release is inexpensive and simple to install, and very convenient. It's the first (and to me, the most appreciated) addition I made to my Ultra Carry. I too am one of those quaint guys who use the features the gun was designed with...

possum
January 2, 2008, 02:26 PM
Most of my pistols dont have safeties.
mine either
That's not very safe
i disagree

BlindJustice
January 2, 2008, 05:16 PM
Hey BigMIke66

I replaced the carbon steel Colt style Slide Lock/Release
on my SW1911 with the Wilson Combat Extended SLide L/R.
The WC Extd. SLide L/R extends out with a horizontal
surface of serrations parallel to the slide. The distance
rearward is just short of the rearward end of it being
directly vertical above the upper grip screw. The
top of the LH grip panel has to be relieved for
clearance. It provides easy operation with either
thumb & especially with the RH thumb without having
to shift my grip and I have long fingers ( 6'4" 190 lbs
and in the day I played hoops almost able to 'palm' a
basketball for a ref. point. )

The WC Extended Slide L/R is $ 30

CountGlockula
January 2, 2008, 05:20 PM
Buy an extended slide stop lever.

Aguila Blanca
January 4, 2008, 12:35 AM
I rack the slide -- because that's how I was taught to do it many years ago and it's now what I do automatically. I tried an extended slide stop on one 1911. Didn't like it. Yes, I could release it with just the shooting hand. But it got in the way, and it ate my holsters.

I think it was 1911Tuner who wrote something about folks who want to believe they can outsmart John Moses Browning ...

Double Naught Spy
January 4, 2008, 01:45 AM
I think it was 1911Tuner who wrote something about folks who want to believe they can outsmart John Moses Browning

This has nothing to do with outsmarting JMB. The 1911 wasn't a gun with features unique to JMB's master plan for a great gun. The gun was a pseudobastard stepchild creation between Browning and the Military. Neither of those entities were able to fully anticipate all of the potential future issues that might arise from the design and its limits.

If you look at the first 1911s, you will see that they were designed for right-handed shooters (left side controls) with very good eye sight (original 1911 sights were tiny, precise, but tiny and hugely difficult to use in lower light situations), not to be used by people with small hands, and that JMB and the military thought it was okay to make the shooters pay for shooting the 1911 with blood via hammerbites on the hand's web.

Nobody would consider changing over to non-corrosive ammo as an attempt to outsmart JMB, but JMB's original 1911s used corrosive ammo. Nor would folks consider better sights as outsmarting him either. Put another way, the 1911 was not a perfect design for everyone in all situations and situations have changed a lot since 1911.

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