Hog hunting: Backup sidearm.


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bg226
January 16, 2008, 09:56 PM
A rifle will be used as the primary, but I would like some advice on a backup sidearm. I've heard that .45s have a difficult time penetrating through hog skulls. :what:

I do not want to have to purchase a new weapon, so i'm limited to 9mm, .40 and .45. I'm not sure which one to take with.

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Tom Krein
January 16, 2008, 10:15 PM
IF a rifle is your primary weapon I think any of the below would work..

I would use FMJ heavy for caliber bullets. The 9mm or 40 S&W might be better as you really need to get some penetration on Hogs, especially the bigger ones!

Are there snakes where you hunt?? If so a .357mag, 41. Mag, .45 Colt, or .44 mag revolver would be perfect. Load up the first round under the hammer with snake shot and then heavy for caliber lead bullets with BIG meplats!!

I just purchased a Glock 20 in 10mm to use as a back up for Hog Hunting and EDC. I love the 10mm and the hotter 200+gr lead bullets will do the trick! Need to replace the barrel as a stock Glock isn't set up for lead bullets.

Now you just need to go on a Hog Knife hunt!! :D

Tom

retrieverman
January 17, 2008, 12:46 AM
I hunt hogs quite frequently and have never felt the need for a backup weapon.

If I can't kill one with a scoped high powered rifle, I would sure be pissing in the wind trying to hit one with a pistol.

Tom Krein
January 17, 2008, 12:50 AM
I agree, but it would be nice for EXTREME close range/heavy cover, snakes, feral dogs and finishing shots....

RIGHT?? maybe....

I just don't leave home without a sidearm anymore if I can help it.

Tom

oklahoma caveman
January 17, 2008, 01:09 AM
Now you just need to go on a Hog Knife hunt!!

im your huckleberry!:D
iv always wanted to do exactly that.

alsaqr
January 17, 2008, 09:07 AM
"I hunt hogs quite frequently and have never felt the need for a backup weapon."

Same here. Must say that I have felt a little naked a couple of times when it was necessary to go into a plum thicket after a wounded boar with a muzzleloader. A very big hog did come after me: He was shot and killed at about 12 feet from me.

MCgunner
January 17, 2008, 03:22 PM
I like a .45...but not ACP. I load a 300 grain XTP to just short of 1200 fps in my 4 5/8" stainless Blackhawk. I'd trust my 180 grain .357 load to most hogs, but on a really big one, I'd want a .41, .44, .45Colt. Not such a thing as overkill when you have to blood trail a hog in heavy cover. I know this for a fact.:what: Gets your blood pumpin' when they charge you, though.

Best idea is to make that rifle shot count. ;) But, everyone makes mistakes.

spencerhut
January 17, 2008, 03:46 PM
When I was a kid (12) I was chased up a tree by a hog I didn't quite shoot well enough. I emptied my 1911 (.45ACP) into the hog as it stomped on my 1940 German Mauser and ruined the scope. Not one round from the .45 made it though the hog at less than 10 feet. It died from the 8mm shot a minute or two later. Five of the seven hollow point slugs were recovered from the hog in non vital areas.

bdg146
January 17, 2008, 03:48 PM
I've never been hog hunting, but you guys sure do make it sound exciting.

Tom Krein
January 17, 2008, 03:51 PM
It really is a LOT of FUN! You should give it a try!

Tom

TehK1w1
January 17, 2008, 04:23 PM
I just hunt with a big-bore lever action rifle :) A 444 Marlin pushing 300 grain softpoints at 2150 FPS muzzle velocity will stop hogs pretty reliably. I also carry some 305 grain FMJs for those marauding rhinos :)

Pumpkinheaver
January 18, 2008, 12:13 AM
Use your .45 with a cast truncated cone bullet. Causes more efeect on target than a RN bullet.

MCgunner
January 18, 2008, 12:04 PM
I just hunt with a big-bore lever action rifle A 444 Marlin pushing 300 grain softpoints at 2150 FPS muzzle velocity will stop hogs pretty reliably. I also carry some 305 grain FMJs for those marauding rhinos

That's all fine and good unless you're trailing the trail though heavy brush on your hands and knees. The handgun is much handier for heavy cover. That's why I like to tote the big caliber revolver and, I mean, it's just nice to carry afield. I just don't wanna come face to face with a POed pig when I'm on my hands and knees and have to put a rifle into action. THAT hasn't happened, but being on my hands and knees through the rose hedge following blood has. Fortunately I was on my feet when I had to shoot, rifle slung across my back having just popped out of the rose hedge. I had hit that hog with 3300 ft lbs from my 7 mag, just didn't make a good shot, my fault, but no reason to die in the brush. LOL

Oh, btw, a hog's head isn't bullet proof. I've put down big barnyard hogs with a .22. It's just that big hogs in the wild have this armor plated (literally) shoulder area that takes some penetration and you might not get a clear shot at the head on a moving pig, small target.

T.R.
January 18, 2008, 04:11 PM
A 22 revolver or pistol is useful for making a finisher if needed. But I sure wouldn't drop my powerful rifle to attempt stopping a charge with a handgun. That is like bringing a knife to a gun fight as Sean Connery once said.

TR

Tom Krein
January 18, 2008, 07:51 PM
Bringing a knife to a gun fight is not as dumb as it sounds.... SERIOUSLY!

There are some times when a handgun will better serve you than a rifle!

Tom

MCgunner
January 18, 2008, 10:36 PM
Hogs like heavy cover, stick to it when danger is near. When wounded, 100 percent of the time, you can bet that's where they're goin'. If you're in a closet with a BG and he has a shotgun and you have a knife, advantage knife...... A big pig has a mouth full of 'em.

pernicus
January 18, 2008, 11:35 PM
i'm going to get flack for saying desert eagle but in all seriousness

.44magnum with 240 grain soft points...haven't shot a hog with it yet though but i like it alot mroe than any .44mag revolver i've shot...and i managed to hit a doe 3 times with it in a pinethicket once...there was deer in the trees lol :what:

alsaqr
January 19, 2008, 09:17 AM
Usually hunt hogs with a muzzleloader: After being chased several times, I do keep my Remington model 870 rifled barrel shotgun in the truck to take into thickets after hogs.

Katana8869
January 19, 2008, 10:29 AM
My hog gun is a Remington 870 loaded with 1 slug in the chamber, 2 more in the magazine followed by 2 00 buckshot rounds. I figure that if I'm being charged it's better to keep my primary gun in my hands and firing as long as possible.

I keep my .357 640 in my pocket when I hunt hogs, but like some folks have already said, there are may be situations where a knife would be the better option.

All considered, any of the calibers that the OP mentioned would do fine for a back up gun on a hog hunt, but if I were to chose the 9mm, I would not go with less than a 147gr bullet.

Ranger J
January 19, 2008, 11:14 AM
Let's see if I got this right: Rifle/shotgun backed up by a pistol. Pistol backed up by a knife. Knife backed up by what...a baseball bat maybe? Seems like we are are going kind of counter evolution here. What kind of back up do African big game hunters use?:rolleyes::):)

RJ

MCgunner
January 19, 2008, 11:18 AM
To each his own. If you don't mind tracking a wounded boar in heavy cover with a rifle, go for it. Right tool for the job, I say, and besides, do I really NEED a reason to carry my .45 Colt? Do they even HAVE rose hedge in Africa? I HAVE heard that the PHes there often carry shotguns for tracking wounded leopards. Not a lot of difference in application there, I'd think. Right tool for the job.

Browning
January 19, 2008, 11:41 AM
bg226 : I do not want to have to purchase a new weapon, so i'm limited to 9mm, .40 and .45. I'm not sure which one to take with.

Out of those three I'd use the .45 ACP and load it with some deep penetrating JHP load.

Maybe something like the Cor-Bon 185 grain DPX (Deep Penetrating X Round) would do the trick.
http://www.handgunsmag.com/ammunition/HGdpx_022305A.jpg

http://www.handgunsmag.com/ammunition/HGdpx_022305B.jpg

http://www.handgunsmag.com/ammunition/dpx_022305/

http://www.hipowersandhandguns.com/Corbon%20.45%20ACP.htm

http://www.ableammo.com/catalog/product_info.php?manufacturers_id=95&products_id=75028

It still expands some and it creates a large wound channel, but it'll hold together through alot of meat and bone instead of fragmenting inside of 8 or 9 inches. The 185 grain +P would probably be a little more suited towards hunting than the 165 grain +P CorBon load.

plumberroy
January 19, 2008, 12:58 PM
Make the first shot count and don't worry about a backup:D lol I know that is easier said than done. I carry a hand gun all most all the time, and in bear country a pistol on your belt is better than a rifle leaning over yonder . but about any modern rifle or 12ga slug has at least twice the M.E. than any handgun the average person can handle and 4 + times the M.E. of the autos mentioned It is kinda like backing up a f350 with a pinto to me.. I can maybe see it with a muzzleloader since it is about 20 seconds to reload with a speed loader. I tend to carry a 22 handgun when I'm carrying a heavy rifle or slug gun or a large bore handgun when hunting small game
Disclaimer : My hunting style is up close and personal so my primary guns are usually something short and and pointable with low power scopes or shotgun with brenneke slugs I you are using a long barreled long range rifle with high powered scope you are in a different boat, take this into consideration when reading my opinion
Roy

retrieverman
January 19, 2008, 08:07 PM
I would go with a 357 for a back up weapon.

retrieverman
January 19, 2008, 08:12 PM
Here is a boar that I killed this week. It is proven fact that a bullet from a 308 or similar caliber to the side of the head will eliminate the need for a back up weapon or even a back up shot.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/retrieverman/Picture218.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/retrieverman/Picture208.jpg

alsaqr
January 19, 2008, 08:45 PM
"Here is a boar that I killed this week. It is proven fact that a bullet from a 308 or similar caliber to the side of the head will eliminate the need for a back up weapon or even a back up shot."

Bingo!!! Bang Flop is the way to go.

rhubarb
January 20, 2008, 12:01 AM
Ah, the illustrious unkillable wild hog!

I carry the same sidearm with the same hollowpoint ammo in the woods that I carry in town - a Ruger P95 9mm with Remington Golden Saber 124g.

I've shot a hundred pound hog with it to finish him. It went through his forehead, down his neck, and exited midway down his front leg. Bulletproof, indeed. I've never seen one of those big bruisers and I wouldn't shoot one if I did. For me, nine is fine.

eastwood44mag
January 20, 2008, 12:38 AM
.44 or .45 will work for you. 9mm is known to make them angry, but not kill them, especially on the big ones.

jpwilly
January 21, 2008, 11:43 PM
As for the Auto's listed bullet selection will have more to do with success of said caliber. A hunting bullet like the solid-copper JHP Barnes X bullet should perform very well. I personally use my 1911 45acp or 400 Corbon bbl for my BUG.

3pairs12
January 21, 2008, 11:48 PM
I carry 40 cal for my side arm when hog hunting. I have never needed a side arm though, but hopefully someday I will.

kmrcstintn
January 22, 2008, 12:39 PM
for the niners out there, I thought that Sellier & Bellot loads a 115 gr jacketed soft point 9mm parabellum round...might be a good choice between fmj and hollowpoints...deeper penetration than hollowpoints, but expansion instead of fmj

mgregg85
January 22, 2008, 06:49 PM
If your worried about penetration, pick yourself up a cz-52 and some of the FMJ surplus ammo. If the 7.62x25mm round can punch through a kevlar helmet, I've gotta believe it will go through a pig skull.

bavarianbrit
March 5, 2008, 04:27 AM
I put 4 rounds of .44 special down behind the neck of a wounded 40 kilogram boar but it still carried on breathing and grunting its hate at me so it took another 7x57 to finish it off.
I reckon a sawnoff 12g double with slugs would be the best close range backup weapon. But where are they legal`?

Nathanael_Greene
March 5, 2008, 08:48 AM
I carry a .357 as a sidearm when I go hog hunting. I've never had to use it, but I've been glad to have it a couple of times when I've been heard big hogs growling around me (they were out of flash range in this photo, but definitely in hearing range):

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a248/NathanaelGreene/dozensofpiggies.jpg

qajaq59
March 5, 2008, 08:52 AM
I've never been hog hunting, but you guys sure do make it sound exciting. Oh, it definitely is that........

sniper5
March 5, 2008, 12:04 PM
I'll probably catch flak from the Rambo types, but I used to bowhunt pigs when I lived around Red Bluff while I was in my early 20's and never felt the need for a backup. Nor did any of the other bowhunters I hung out with. Pigs are potentially dangerous when cornered or wounded but they are not firebreathing dragons that fly and rain down destruction. Any animal can be dangerous when cornered or wounded. Deer, bear, pigs, mountain goats, buffalo, etc.

Had some minor adventures but still got all my body parts and so do those I know.

Had rifles and handguns, just never felt the need when I was out with a bow. Now at the time I was shooting FITA (look that one up) and hunting pheasant (yes it's possible with the right equipment and practice,practice,practice) and was using something high poundage with Zwickey Black Diamond Deltas (legend has it Howard Hill had them designed to bowhunt elephants-under the right conditions they will survive being shot through the side of an oil drum if you have enough bow to drive them). Point being I was thoroughly comfortable with my weapon and my abilities to handle what came up.

Sorry, no brag just fact.

I also hunted with handguns and rifles, never felt the I needed to carry one when I had the other.

If you don't feel like what you are carrying is adequate to control the situation, why are you carrying it? I never took anything into the field I didn't feel completely comfortable with. Not being a smartass, just wondering if maybe you shouldn't rethink your primary weapon .

mbt2001
March 5, 2008, 04:38 PM
I recommend carrying a sidearm when you go hunting, but frankly, if a rifle is your primary, then you are fine to use a .22 lr.

.45's do not have "trouble" penetrating hog skulls. The simple fact of the matter is that that Hog anatomy is a bit different than deer anatomy. So, please study it to learn WHERE the hog brain is. A .22lr close range on a wounded hog results in a dead hog, BUT ONLY IF the shot is on target.

nathan
March 5, 2008, 08:31 PM
I carried my Glock 23 when I went hunting. AT least I m ready in case one encounters two legged mofos.

tblt
March 5, 2008, 08:37 PM
learn to shoot your rifle better one shot one kill

mbt2001
March 6, 2008, 03:47 PM
learn to shoot your rifle better one shot one kill

Part of the reason for being "out" when you are hunting, hiking, exploring, camping is the romance of it all. If someone needs and excuse to carry a sidearm when that is what they want to do anyway, I am happy to give it to them.

Furthermore, the "one shot one kill" military machismo isn't exactly the way it goes down in the field. Many times, when I am deer hunting, I see a rabbit or ground squirrel and pop them for the camp skillet. A .30-30 isn't a small game gun. I always carry a .22 sidearm for those kind of occasions. Makes a handy partner for romping and / or finishing shots or really whatever the need is. A friend of mine hit a javelina and finished it with his .25-06 almost point blank, the bullet deflected and dad gum near got his dog...

Also, on many South Texas game ranches you might run into some scary situations with people running illegal contraband over the border. I here the same is true in other areas with Meth Labs and marijuana feilds.

Funderb
March 6, 2008, 03:55 PM
use a .45 and shoot the thing in the eye.

NWdude83
March 6, 2008, 05:22 PM
10mm

TCB in TN
March 7, 2008, 07:18 PM
I have shot and killed several boar over the years. Most have dropped after the first shot. A couple didn't! One particularly nasty individual took a couple of 30-06 rounds in the wheel house, and still went after the dogs and a buddy of mine. Close in range in heavy brush where getting a long gun around was often problematic. I happened to be carrying a short 30-30 marlin saddle gun that I was able to get it around and get a decent shot. My buddy who was trying to get out of the way AND shoot the thing couldn't get his Remmy 700 around in the thick stuff to protect himself. Ended up droppin his rifle and grabbin a branch just as it dropped. He always carries a pistol on his hip for thick stuff these days.

First hog I ever shot, was while squirrel huntin. Jumped it up and I had to climb to get away. A dozen .22lr to the skull just made him a little more mad than he was. Kept me up there for the better part of an hour when he finally lost interest and took off. (BTW I was 14) It scared the crap outta me!

nathan
March 9, 2008, 03:28 AM
Last deer season of 2004 my buddies and i were hunting somewhere in Llano , Tx. We didnt see any deer but one of my friends shot a bobcat. It lived towards the next day until we found it. Both legs were broken but very much alive. My buddy brought along his 9 mm SW and he pumped several rounds to it . The cat did nt die right away. Oh maybe he fired 9 rds to end it finally. As the saying goes, a cat has 9 lives , meant something that day to all of us. LOL

3pairs12
March 13, 2008, 12:27 PM
http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh175/steere12/2_DALE_WITH_HIS_BIG_CATCH_4_15_2007.jpg

Here is a little pig I killed with my knife and the farmer doesn't allow us to have a sidearm. When we cuaght this a BIG boar rushed us, got lucky because he changed his mind at like 6 feet. The place we hunt now we can have sidearms but still haven't needed it.

BroughtEnoughGun
March 14, 2008, 02:34 AM
I'll probably catch flak from the Rambo types, but I used to bowhunt pigs when I lived around Red Bluff while I was in my early 20's and never felt the need for a backup. Nor did any of the other bowhunters I hung out with. Pigs are potentially dangerous when cornered or wounded but they are not firebreathing dragons that fly and rain down destruction. Any animal can be dangerous when cornered or wounded. Deer, bear, pigs, mountain goats, buffalo, etc.

Had some minor adventures but still got all my body parts and so do those I know.

Had rifles and handguns, just never felt the need when I was out with a bow. Now at the time I was shooting FITA (look that one up) and hunting pheasant (yes it's possible with the right equipment and practice,practice,practice) and was using something high poundage with Zwickey Black Diamond Deltas (legend has it Howard Hill had them designed to bowhunt elephants-under the right conditions they will survive being shot through the side of an oil drum if you have enough bow to drive them). Point being I was thoroughly comfortable with my weapon and my abilities to handle what came up.

Sorry, no brag just fact.

I also hunted with handguns and rifles, never felt the I needed to carry one when I had the other.

If you don't feel like what you are carrying is adequate to control the situation, why are you carrying it? I never took anything into the field I didn't feel completely comfortable with. Not being a smartass, just wondering if maybe you shouldn't rethink your primary weapon .

Sniper5 , whered you go? I live in Redding, and Ive been going to Red Bluff here and there to look for some hogs and I havent found any, just signs that they were there.
Anything Helps.

-Gun

rr2241tx
March 18, 2008, 08:07 PM
Take the .45ACP, load it with the heaviest flat meplat hardcast bullet it will feed and aim very carefully with your rifle shot. Any hollowpoint handgun round is a waste of time when trying to stop a hog of any size large enough to be a danger to you. If a wounded hog runs into tight cover, first rule: give it time to die of its wounds before you start in after it. Rule #2: he isn't alone in there and his buddies will be as afraid of you as he is, so think it through carefully before you go where you shouldn't be. Rule#3: NEVER, EVER put snake shot in the gun you are counting on to save you from a p*ssed off hog, you might need the first one to count.

Hugo
October 25, 2011, 02:26 AM
Frankenstein thread just in case.

Noob to hunting but have read some books and websites. Always remember hogs have tough bones and skulls. Their hides get scarred up and tough fighting with other hogs and their dangerous tusks. Older ones have tougher hides and are likely just meaner.

For Hogs, hollow point bullets often just bounce off or slide along the bones. Probably not so much for .500 S&W but FMJ is the way to penetrate the skull. Hard, tough, and heavy bullet required. No soft bullets which bounce or get too deformed on bones.

Their tough hide and thickening (with age and fights) cartilage and scar tissue on neck and sides is a low-grade armor. Also shoot just behind the ear for a headshot from the side. From the front with a Hog coming at you.... in the Eye would be best but very small target.

If you were low enough already maybe shoot into mouth or up snout? Also really tough and unlikely. This is a case where the cliche "More power" is a good idea.

35 Whelen
October 25, 2011, 02:51 AM
Having raised LOTS of hogs as a kid and having hunted them for most of my life, I can tell you that they have crappy eyesight and likely most of the "charges" you read about on the internet were more a poor hog running in the wrong direction instead of attacking. That's probably what happened here:

"When we cuaght this a BIG boar rushed us, got lucky because he changed his mind at like 6 feet."

I 'spect the boar realized he'd run the wrong direction and simply reversed course.....who knows.

I worry more about sows with little ones than boars. When we used to clip the needle teeth and notch the ears on our piglets, the sows would go berserk at the sqealing.

I hunt hogs quite frequently and have never felt the need for a backup weapon.

If I can't kill one with a scoped high powered rifle, I would sure be pissing in the wind trying to hit one with a pistol.

This guy^ saved me alot of typing.


Five of the seven hollow point slugs were recovered from the hog in non vital areas.

Yep. Hollowpoints work best in magazine ads. The very reason I do not understand why people insist on using hollowpoints when hunting with handguns. Read up on Elmer Keith and Veral Smith.

35W

BBQLS1
October 25, 2011, 09:47 AM
Use a good hard cast bullet in your .45 and you should be fine.

AKElroy
October 25, 2011, 10:11 AM
I see no need for a back-up pistol in hog hunting. First, if the animal needs a follow-up, I am NOT walking up on it, so the rifle gets to place a second shot. Ditto for deer, as I view them equally dangerous when down but not out. (try to find examples of hunters killed by hogs, and it is largely a waist of google time; try it for deer, and you get lots of results). Second, if the cover is so heavy that I can't easily swing my .30-30 into action, I'M NOT GOING IN THERE. Getting carved up by mesquite and briar thorns is not my favorite activity. I have killed dozens of pigs in the last three years, had to shoot only one of them a second time, and have yet to take a charge. Of course, they will have a difficult time getting into my truck, the side window of which is my near exclusive shooting rest. I don't hide in the truck out of fear, just laziness. When I do occasionally venture out on foot, I have walked up on many bedded piggies, and so far they have all bolted in the opposite direction. The notion that they are ravenous killing machines is ridiculously overblown.

der Teufel
October 25, 2011, 06:06 PM
I reckon that if a hog 'charges' my direction, there's no way I'm going to be able to drop my rifle and pull out a pistol in time to do any good. Besides, I now hunt with an AR-10 ;) so if I need a fast follow-up shot, I'm ready. But I usually carry a 9mm anyway.

I developed the habit of hauling the 9mm along because I used to hunt with a bolt-action, and sometimes I'd shoot one that would run into some thick brush. In places it was difficult to get through the brush while carrying a rifle, so I started just taking a pistol to track them. That works pretty well -- I'm not talking about going after a slightly wounded, angry animal that's thrashing around, it's more like a dying but not quite dead hog that I simply need to finish off before I drag it out. A 9mm FMJ to the head at a range of two feet usually does the job, :cool: and the ammo is cheap.
--

Loosedhorse
October 26, 2011, 08:46 PM
In hunting, we can choose whether or not to take the shot. If the distance, or the presentation, or the lighting, or intervening obstacles, or anything else about the shot make us believe that wounding is more likely than killing, we don't take the shot.

Back-up is different. Back-up is like self-defense: I didn't ask to be here, with a wounded, angry boar charging at me through underbrush, but there he is.

The rule for SD is carry the most powerful gun you can shoot well, quickly. If that's a .357, that's fine. If that's a .500, better--but fewer can do that.

Up to you. Of your choices, I guess I'd go heavy: .45 hardball.

tahunua001
October 27, 2011, 05:05 PM
and of you three will work. one time we bought a little pig to butcher and my brother brought his 22lr to put it down, at point blank range right between the eyes all this thing did was knock the poor beast unconscious for a couple seconds and then it would hop up again and start squealing. we had a heckuva time putting the poor beast down but we finally just held it down nd slit it's throat.

about a month later we had an offer to butcher the things mother and we could keep half the meat for the trouble. not wanting to turn up a 200 pounds of free pork my brother borrowed a buddies 38sp and tried another between the eyes shot. he bullet went all the way through the skull and imbedded in the top of the neck near the base of the skull. if a 38sp will do it a 45ACP definitely will

Double Naught Spy
October 27, 2011, 05:41 PM
Let's see if I got this right: Rifle/shotgun backed up by a pistol. Pistol backed up by a knife. Knife backed up by what...a baseball bat maybe? Seems like we are are going kind of counter evolution here. What kind of back up do African big game hunters use?

Based on the videos, they are backed up by guides and others in the hunting party, all armed with various long guns and when they have to shoot to protect the hunter, there is all sorts of racket made, missed shots, and a lot of poor muzzle discipline.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CNgwZgoKFc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O85siV8DnIA
http://trophyroom.com/video/BIkAidNXYP

buckshoteer
October 27, 2011, 06:08 PM
I carry a concealed .357 snubnose. It's not that hard to pull out even with a coat on. I use a standard 158 grain bullet.

Dr.Rob
October 27, 2011, 07:00 PM
I had a buddy that took after a Russian Boar with a hot loaded 45 Colt.

Damn thing soaked up six rounds. I don't know if it was shot placement, bullet design, or just one mad boar. But it kept on going well past when everyone thought it was done for.


I carry a 44 mag as a back up gun for all my big game hunting, but understanding a really BIG pig might take a few shots.

alsaqr
October 27, 2011, 08:41 PM
i don't do backup guns. Much of my hunting is on federal property where the carry of a sidearm is prohibited; besides i've got too much junk to carry now. Most of my wild hog hunting is done with a muzzleloader. If a hog is wounded i reload and go after it ASAP: After i put on my kevlar chainsaw pants.

Had hogs come after me four times: Two were wounded boars, one big boar answered the distress call of a sow i wounded and a sow came after me when i got between her and her pigs. The big boar that answered the sows distress call came close to hitting me but died for his trouble.

FLAvalanche
October 28, 2011, 04:23 PM
You shouldn't need a backup firearm for hog hunting. I do carry my 1911 with me but the only time I use it is if I feel like shooting them with that instead of my rifle.

As for .45 not penetrating a hog...tell that to the picture.

CMC
October 28, 2011, 04:39 PM
I have killed them with bow , muzzleloader rifle and shotgun.
The only time I had to track one in the dark by myself was one I shot with the bow and I found myself sorrounded by a lot of pigs with only a 45, I gave up finding that one.
Nowadays If I shoot a hog with the bow and have to chase it I go back to my truck and get my shotgun and my sidearm is a fullsize 10 mm or a 454 Casull.
One year I shot two of them with the Muzzle loader and when I went to drag them out there were a lot of them around , one shot from my 454 scattered them around and never came back.

03Shadowbob
October 30, 2011, 09:26 AM
My back up is whatever I happen to be carrying that day in general. Might be my 38snub, 357 or 1911. I've never needed a back up gun when hunting.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
October 31, 2011, 04:32 PM
Man someone dug DEEP in the archives to find this thread! :scrutiny:

Having raised LOTS of hogs as a kid and having hunted them for most of my life, I can tell you that they have crappy eyesight and likely most of the "charges" you read about on the internet were more a poor hog running in the wrong direction instead of attacking. That's probably what happened here:

"When we cuaght this a BIG boar rushed us, got lucky because he changed his mind at like 6 feet."

I 'spect the boar realized he'd run the wrong direction and simply reversed course.....who knows.

I worry more about sows with little ones than boars. When we used to clip the needle teeth and notch the ears on our piglets, the sows would go berserk at the sqealing.

^^ sometimes true but not always. I've seen my share of boars that have just flat out had enough and turn around to "edumuhcate" the person trying to harm them. Every now and again you will get one that will turn on a pack of dogs as well even before being cornered or bayed up. They are sometimes VERY unpredictable. Yes they do have crappy eyesight but it's not as poor as some tend to believe. They are smarter than dogs (and a LOT of humans I know) and will fool you. It's always better to be safe and not sorry.

Grew up hunting the Russian strain and feral in Tennessee long before there was a serious problem. Boars are mean, nasty, unpredictable, and most of all intelligent. Sow's are another story entirely. In many cases I have seen the mean streak more from them than in boars. You just don't mess with "MAMMY" :what: I carry anything from a .357 Colt Python, .44mag Super Redhawk, or a .500 S&W. I am much more accurate with any of those 3 than I am with my 1911's. I guess it is a mental thing knowing that I will not have near as fast of a followup shot if needed. I don't typically need a backup as I am pretty quick with my levers that I generally hog hunt with. But I do hunt some with a TC pro hunter in 7mm.08 and feel a bit more comfortable with one of my "hog legs" on my thigh just in case I didn't do my part as well as I should with that single shot.

DammitBoy
October 31, 2011, 04:52 PM
I've hunted boar successfully with .223, .22, .45 colt, .243, 12 ga slugs and buckshot.

These days, I hunt them with my Ruger Blackhawk in 45 colt...

tx_pistolero
November 1, 2011, 03:01 PM
For the most part, a pistol for "protection" against hogs is just not necessary. The chances of one coming at you while you are walking to or from your hunting blind are too slim to even try to calculate. If you drop one but it is still moving, shoot him with your rifle again.

The exception to this are a few specific situations, if you are hunting with dogs (you usually use a knife, but sometimes the crap hits the fan) or spot and stalk bow hunting, or something along these lines.

By and large, a hog is going to leave the country without delay when he gets a whiff/sight of you. Really, the only time they will get you is if they can get you with a minimum of detour off their escape path, OR if you are standing where they intended to run anyway.

Another rare exception to this is a sow with pigs. Again, you would have to sneak up on them and surprise them. She will come out of her way to get you, should you get in the middle of them. Not going to happen unless you are stalking through their bedding areas or creeks where they are laying. Again, 1,000 to one chance of you coming on this situation walking to your average blind.

Bottom line, the chances of actually needing a pistol for protection hog hunting is SLIM. BUT, it does make a good excuse to buy guns :D
So I won't tell if you don't
haha

DammitBoy
November 1, 2011, 06:01 PM
I've had at least a dozen boar charge me over the years, it happens. It doesn't happen a lot, but don't think that it won't...

tx_pistolero
November 1, 2011, 09:59 PM
A dozen boar charges? You'll have to explain that. I have taken well over a thousand hogs, many of them big boars and I can count on one hand the times I have been charged. So outside of the scenarios/exceptions I named, how does one go about getting charged constantly by boar? It seems WAY outside the norms of what my experiences has shown.

P.S. I realize that a 1,000 hogs seems like a ridiculously high number, but I live in south texas and have worked as a hunting guide/and or doing feral hog control for the last 15 years. I can back this up if required.

DammitBoy
November 2, 2011, 12:58 AM
A dozen charges over 25 years of hawg hunting doesn't seem high or unusual to me. I wouldn't call that "constantly" either. I've averaged about 10 hogs/boar a year so my 250+/- doesn't come near your level of experience, but we live in vastly different areas.

I hunt boar in deep pine river bottom country in Alabama. You can surprise a hog at close distance pretty easily here. We also have a lot of russian boar and arkansas razorback mixed in with our local feral hogs. I don't know if that makes a difference, I'm no expert.

As an example, my ex-wife's family has a cotton farm and they get a pest control permit every year to cut down on the deer population out of season to protect their crops. We will take 4-5 guys in a pick-up truck and night shoot with lights and .22's - usually we take about 20 does and 10-15 pigs on a good night.

One such night, I spotted what was either a hog laying down or a huge dirt mound rutted up by the pigs about 30 feet from our truck. Just to check if it was a hog, I shot the highest point of the dirt mounds ridge. When my .22 hit the 'mound' it turned out to be a very angry 300lbs sow. She reared up squeeling and charged the truck incredibly fast. Several of us got off shots before she slammed into the truck and expired.

It happens now and then.

03Shadowbob
November 2, 2011, 10:05 AM
Damnitboy,
You are supposed to spray the estrus on the ground and trees not yourself. Maybe that's why you keep getting charged. :D
Just kidding!!

tx_pistolero
November 2, 2011, 01:24 PM
DammitBoy, it definitely sounds like into the category of 'exceptions' I made. Sounds like you do a lot of spot and stalking, in creek bottoms and such. Like I said in my post, that is an exception, because that is a good way to surprise them up close, and you never know what will happen in that case. Sounds like your method is sound, if it hasn't gotten you hurt in 25 years of hunting. ;)

I think most hunters, especially in Texas are hunting from box blinds and stands from 35+ yards away, and the hog never knows they are there. That is how 90% + of the folks hunt around here, I would say.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
November 2, 2011, 01:55 PM
tx_pistolero, Texas hog hunting is actually the exception. Most all other southern states, where hogs are prevalent, are swampy or heavily wooded. Most either spot and stalk or hunt hogs with dogs in most other places. In Texas, you are correct. Most hunt from blinds and stands over feeders or in known hog fields (which in Texas is pretty much any field).

As I said earlier, I have been hog hunting for 40+ years. They started hogs in Catoosa hunting preserve over 50 years ago. I cut my eye teeth on hog hunting and know the animals nature very well. They are a very ornery animal and have a very nasty mean streak. Of course if someone is out trying to kill me I guess I would have a mean streak as well. I too have been chased up a number of trees from surprising a hog or not sticking one well enough with an arrow. 2 really good things came out of those cases. 1, I learned better arrow placement, 2, I got REALLY good with a pistol :D A 250 pound ball of pissed off with teeth is a great teacher :rolleyes:

buckshoteer
November 2, 2011, 02:43 PM
A .357 2 inch is good for me.

tx_pistolero
November 2, 2011, 02:48 PM
Freedom_fighter_in_IL, funny you mention that, I hunt with dogs, as do a lot of people down here in south texas. People been doing it that way for generations down here as in the rest of the south. On a related note, the tradition of hunting deer with dogs has never caught on down here, for whatever reason. Not really a part of our culture. Always thought that was kind of odd.

Anyways, I have hunted hogs everywhere from the calcasieu river bottoms in Lousianna, to central florida - I still feel like by and large the vast majority are doing medium to long range shooting, and are worrying too much about needing a hog defense pistol...lol.

Bowhunters like you, again, fall into the exception categories I listed. Again, in my experience. When you stick a hog from 10 yards away, if he sees you, things can get hairy in a hurry! haha

DammitBoy
November 2, 2011, 03:12 PM
tx - you are correct, mostly stalking in deep heavy woods and creek bottoms and sloughs - usually in hip waders. Our brush is so heavy, 10 yards would be a long shot.

It does get hairy in a hurry for sure! That what I enjoy about it, it's the closest thing to lion country safari we have in the southeast.

Nothing like facing a charging angry 275lbs boar intent on doing you harm, knowing you better make that first shot count. Even more so with my 7.5" Ruger Blackhawk in .45 colt.

I used to use my Remington 1100, but that seemed like an unfair advantage...

hiker44
November 2, 2011, 03:54 PM
I carry my .357 revolver, but with two of the chambers loaded with CCI snake shot, just in case I encounter an uninvited rattler in the brush. Otherwise, it is seldom , if ever, necessary. If the snake appears, it's easy enough to rotate the cylinder and dispatch it. To make that easier, I paint the casings of the CCI aluminum ammo with a red Sharpie, so I can easily tell which chambers they're in. Just don't forget which direction the cylinder turns. It would be pointless to shoot a hog in the face with #12 shot, since it would just make it mad.

tx_pistolero
November 2, 2011, 05:09 PM
Hiker, keep in mind a .357 from a pistol, from what I have seen has a pretty good chance of pissing them off too. Out of a rifle, it is a different story, I guess the extra power makes a difference, or maybe it is the fact that rifle tends to give you a little better accuracy.

Don't get me wrong, a .357 pistol is damn sure better than throwing rocks, but if you are in one of those high risk scenarios (stalking/still hunting in bedding areas or creekbottoms, or bowhunting) it would be worth it getting some more power. If you are not in one of those what I am calling 'high risk' scenarios for back of better words, you'll probably be fine. You can drop a good boar with a .357 if all the stars align, and you get the right angle, but when they are coming at you fast not so much.

tx_pistolero
November 2, 2011, 05:20 PM
Figured with all this talking I have been doing, I should show some damn boars too...haha. So here you go, these are a few pics of some of the boars I have taken over the years.

Double Naught Spy
November 2, 2011, 06:59 PM
tx_pistolero, Texas hog hunting is actually the exception. Most all other southern states, where hogs are prevalent, are swampy or heavily wooded. Most either spot and stalk or hunt hogs with dogs in most other places. In Texas, you are correct. Most hunt from blinds and stands over feeders or in known hog fields (which in Texas is pretty much any field).

You haven't seen much of Texas, have you? We have a goodly amount of swamps and we have more forested area than Louisiana has total area, LOL.

MCgunner
November 2, 2011, 07:11 PM
Yeah, come on down to the coastal bend. I'll show you marshland and hogs. :D Texas habitats are VERY diverse sometimes even within a region. It's a big state.

GDWMA, a APH hunting area, is marsh/woods, no feeders, strictly spot and stalk/still hunting, and buckshot only. There's hogs out the wazz down there, but it's hard hunting. You have to be close with buckshot and with no corn, that ain't easy.

Freedom_fighter_in_IL
November 2, 2011, 07:58 PM
You haven't seen much of Texas, have you? We have a goodly amount of swamps and we have more forested area than Louisiana has total area, LOL.

I've hunted a pretty good bit of Texas and yes it is diversified but as I stated, the vast majority that hog hunt Texas tend to hunt over feeders and fields. Just as you do DNS. Granted you now are starting to get the eradication groups out there with the choppers and the dog hunters, but you still have to admit there are many more that hunt from blinds and stands over feeders than any other way in Texas.

MCgunner, I actually hunted in the area of which you speak several years ago. And boy you aren't kidding about it being rough hunting. With 5 of us for 5 days we only took 22 hogs (and yes for us that is a LOW number). As I said this was several years ago when the WMA was just starting to figure out that hogs were a serious problem and they allowed us, and several others over a period of 2 months, to come in and try to drop the numbers. They told us that our group was actually one of the more successful groups. Don't know if they still do that now or not but I would actually like to do it again. Them were some tasty hogs!

darrell walling
November 2, 2011, 09:03 PM
it aint what you shoot but where you shoot em--most times

tx_pistolero
November 2, 2011, 10:23 PM
starting to get the eradication groups out there with the choppers and the dog hunters
Folks have been hunting hogs with dogs down here for 50+ years.
I grew up in the coastal bend, and have hunted in east texas. In east texas they still use fire lanes and feeders, and I am willing to bet it is 90% that way and 10% any other. Same with the coastal bend. 90% feeders, 10% any other.

Been doing this a long time guys, I'm not pulling this out of my butt. I realize you might do it different, but understand how the vast majority hunts. Think of what I-10, or Highway 16, or I-37 looks like right before hunting season. How many trucks towing trailers with box blinds and bags and upon bags corn.

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