Novel Recommendations


PDA






WildeKurt
January 22, 2008, 10:38 AM
I wonder if anyone can recommend some authors/novels which are either firearm related or accurately depict their use as part of the story. I need some brain candy to keep me occupied in airports.

If you enjoyed reading about "Novel Recommendations" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
harmonic
January 22, 2008, 11:01 AM
I'm reading "Time To Hunt" by Stephen Hunter. He's very detailed at presenting a sniper's world. Even down to his descriptions of the sniper's ammo.

ilbob
January 22, 2008, 11:24 AM
His three Bob Lee Swaggert books are quite readable.

The best authors that have the most realistic stories often have very little gun play in them, since gun play is fairly rare. But they also do it right when they do it.

Some of the Clancy books have a small amount of well done shooting scenes. As do some of the WEB Griffin Brotherhood of War and Corps books. But mostly these books are not about guns, or shooters, so much as they are about people.

Unintended Consequences has good gun scenes as well, but its really not a gun play book either.

strat81
January 22, 2008, 11:29 AM
Unintended Consequences
Monster Hunter International

Jim Watson
January 22, 2008, 11:35 AM
Well, they are not a constant blaze of gunfire like more recent adventure thrillers (ilbob is right on that), but Donald Hamilton got nearly all of the gun stuff right in the Matt Helm stories. Do not confuse the books with the silly Dean Martin movies.

Hunter does not know as much about guns as he would have you think.

usp_fan
January 22, 2008, 11:35 AM
+1 for Monster Hunter International. Written by one of our own THR members. Just finished it last week, well written, good story line, an lots of accurate firearms usage. You can get it through Amazon or directly from the author Larry Correia (http://larrycorreia.wordpress.com/).

Phil DeGraves
January 22, 2008, 02:55 PM
Read mine. Please.

TX1911fan
January 22, 2008, 03:01 PM
Andy McNab was a soldier with the SAS and writes a pretty good book, with pretty accurate gun play (except he keeps up with the weak magazine spring thing. He advocates unloading magazines every couple of days to relieve the stress). He's British, so some of the terms are different, but I don't think I've ever seen him call a magazine a clip, so thank goodness for that.

tbone3
January 22, 2008, 05:19 PM
I'm also reading "Time to Hunt" by Stephen Hunter right now. I read the first in the series, "Point of Impact" but I haven't read the second yet. Freakin' Amazon seller never got it to me.:mad: They are both great reads.

cdrt
January 22, 2008, 05:29 PM
Hunter's new book The 47th Samurai is pretty good, though not as firearms related as his other Bob Lee Swagger books. There is more in this book on his father's time on Iwo Jima.

MK11
January 22, 2008, 05:30 PM
Marcus Wynne is pretty good. He's a former "operator" who's a halfway decent writer. The plots are pretty out there but the gun (and knife) stuff is spot-on.

Barry Eisler's "Rain" series is decent on the action and correct use of firearms.

John Sandford is a mystery writer who I highly recommend. Pretty good firearms knowledge (in his latest, the character makes a special trip home to get a .30-06 after someone takes a potshot at him with a rifle). He's also a good writer, rather than just gun guy turned writer.

Cougfan2
January 22, 2008, 05:39 PM
I forget the author, but if you want a good Historical read, "The Arms of Krup" about the Krup family dynasty in Germany is very interesting.

geim druth
January 22, 2008, 06:03 PM
I just read and enjoyed '1632' by Eric Flint.

There are a bunch of sequels, '1633', '1634', etc. I don't know if they're as much fun as the original.

sharkhunter2018
January 22, 2008, 06:25 PM
"Seven Roads to Hell: A Screaming Eagle at Bastogne" by Donald R. Burgett.
The author was just nineteen at the time he was at Bastogne. I would read it again in a heartbeat (coming from someone who does not like to read :))

Correia
January 22, 2008, 07:00 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Monster-Hunter-International-Larry-Correia/dp/0741444569/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201042768&sr=8-1

Correia
January 22, 2008, 07:02 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Monster-Hunter-International-Larry-Correia/dp/0741444569/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201042768&sr=8-1

jpr9954
January 22, 2008, 08:55 PM
A couple of names come to mind. First, Alan Furst who writes some of the best pre-WWII spy novels around. Usually centered around either Paris or Eastern Europe, he weaves guns like the Polish Radom and the Steyr Hahn into his stories. I don't anyone can touch him in creating that film noir feel of smokiness, a Paris cafe, and genteel shabbiness. See his website: http://www.alanfurst.net

The other name is Brad Thor. He was new to me but has made some best-seller lists. I heard him being interviewed on Gun Talk Radio and then read a couple of his books. "Lions of Lucerne" and "Path of the Assassin" are both very good. A bit lighter than Furst but still good. His website is http://www.bradthor.com/

John

Howard Roark
January 22, 2008, 10:08 PM
All of Vince Flynn's books.

Deer Hunter
January 22, 2008, 11:30 PM
The Zombie Survival Guide, or World War Z by Max Brooks. I love his work.

Also, if you want something stimulating, try The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. Not really gun-related, but something everyone should have to read at least twice.

Kentucky
January 22, 2008, 11:53 PM
1. Unintended Consequences. THE MUST READ for anyone who values firearms, freedom, and our heritage. Nothing else comes close IMO.

2. Molon Labe. Some gun play, not the main focus of the book though. THe author clearly knows a lot about firearms (he should :) )

3. EFAD and The Reconquista both have a lot of gunplay in them, again the author obviously knows quite a bit about guns.

4. Monster Hunter. I havent read it myself but I enjoy reading the author's contributions on here:D

What does it say about THR that the authors of all 4 of these books are THR members? What a resource for gun owners! You can probably get John Ross, Boston T Party, Matthew Bracken, or Larry Correia to answer questions personally about their books on here.

Coltdriver
January 23, 2008, 12:01 AM
Go get Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. Spectacular read. The man is hailed as Americas greatest living author. The book is about a kid who goes from Tennessee to Texas and joins a band of hunters paid by the people of Chihuahua to keep the indians at bay. It is historically accurate and one of the best books I have ever read. The authors use of the english language is something you have to experience to fully appreciate.

cobrian45
January 23, 2008, 12:03 AM
Thanks, all. This thread just cost me about $50.00. I went to the MHI site, read the sample chapter and ordered two copies, one for me and one for a friend. I've read Unintended Consequences, by the way. Great Book. I'm glad I'm supporting real gun owners and contributors instead of buying from someone that could use the money to take away something I hold dear.

Bellevance
January 23, 2008, 09:21 AM
THE FIFTH SEASON is a superb and suspenseful literary thriller written by a forum member! (Me.) Just read the reviews...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0609606883/002-3369408-2869648?v=glance&n=283155&v=glance

"I want to say that THE FIFTH SEASON is by far the best detective novel set in New England that I've read since Robert B. Parker's early Spenser novels. But there's a big difference between the two. Don Bredes sets his Hector Bellevance novels among the wild green hills of northern Vermont, in the small town of Tipton, hard by the Canadian border. Bredes's COLD COMFORT (2001) was the first book in what is shaping up to be a really fine series.

Hector Bellevance is Tipton's compassionate and reluctant town constable. He's also an ex-Boston PD homicide detective and Crimson hoops star who, after some serious reversals in the big bad city, has left the force and returned to his tranquil Vermont birthplace to grow vegetables for the local farmer's market.

This story begins on a Sunday at the height of mud season in April, the first morning in the previous 63 that it hasn't been snowing or raining. It's also Hector's 41st birthday, and as he walks around his farm in the early light opening his coldframes full of seedlings to the sun's rays, he feels completely content with his wholesome life. That doesn't last long. At noon, checking his messages, he learns that the town clerk wants him to serve a relief-from-abuse order on the crusty old town road foreman, Marcel Boisvert, a childhood friend of Hector's father. And Hector's girlfriend, Wilma, the number-one reporter for the local newspapaer, wants him to meet her in the high woods near the border, where the county sheriff has just found a headless, handless body. The sunny day, needless to say, quickly becomes a stressful and troubling one.

Then, early the next morning, Hector finds the sheriff and the town clerk shot dead, and the road foreman has disappeared..."

g.willikers
January 23, 2008, 10:13 AM
The Weapon, by Michael Z. Williamson
michaelzwilliamson.com

ilbob
January 23, 2008, 10:59 AM
The other name is Brad Thor. He was new to me but has made some best-seller lists. I heard him being interviewed on Gun Talk Radio and then read a couple of his books. "Lions of Lucerne" and "Path of the Assassin" are both very good. A bit lighter than Furst but still good.
I have read most of his novels in the series. There is a fair amount of gun play, and some of it is pretty interesting, BUT the protagonist is almost a cartoon superhero with powers far exceeding any real human being. The gun play sometimes reads that way too.

If you can get past how unrealistic much of the action and gun play really is, it is an interesting read. I have a hard time with stuff that just ain't real, and I kind of downgrade any fiction that fits in that category.

I don't believe in the lone wolf super agent concept. Those people just do not exist.

boomer1911a1
January 23, 2008, 11:06 AM
David Morrell.
From First Blood on up, he's done well with firearms (except for an early habit of calling gunpowder "Cordite," a habit he has since corrected.) He level of research really comes through.

WildeKurt
January 23, 2008, 11:08 AM
Wow, this'll keep me busy awhile! Thanks all.

tinygnat219
January 23, 2008, 11:15 AM
I just read and enjoyed '1632' by Eric Flint.

Yup! Damn good book. It's got 7-8 books in the series now.

There are a bunch of sequels, '1633', '1634', etc. I don't know if they're as much fun as the original.
1633 drags quite a bit, but 1634 the Galileo affair is a bit better.
If you go online to www.baen.com the earlier books in this series are available for free. The author, Eric Flint, is a big fan of it.

StopTheGrays
January 23, 2008, 11:20 AM
Guns of the South---Harry Turtledove. The one line summary of the book is...What would have happened if the South had been using AK-47s in the Civil War?

slow944
January 23, 2008, 12:10 PM
I like reading the "Ghost" series by John Ringo. As they are sequetial I'd start with the first and read all 4-5 books in the series.

doubleh
January 23, 2008, 12:25 PM
Lee Child does pretty good in the Jack Reacher novels. Even if there wasn't a gun in any of them they are excellent reads. Try Dean Ing's stuff also.

Intrepid Dad
January 23, 2008, 12:27 PM
I like Patriots by James Wesley Rawles.

ilbob
January 23, 2008, 12:53 PM
I like reading the "Ghost" series by John Ringo. As they are sequetial I'd start with the first and read all 4-5 books in the series.

All very good reads, and available from the baen website as ebooks for a very reasonable cost.

I will warn you that some of the books have a fair amount of SM sex scenes in them, so if that offends you, it might be a series you should leave alone.

This is another series of the lone wolf super agent genre, but it does not take itself real seriously, so it can be quite an enjoyable read if you suspend belief for a few hours.

ilbob
January 23, 2008, 12:58 PM
I like Patriots by James Wesley Rawles.
parts of the book read like obsolete commercials.

the first half of the book is quite good, both at telling a story, and laying out a survival path for an economic collapse that is both instructive and a good read. pretty hard to do, and the author did a fine job of it.

the second half is way out there. parts are OK, but no where near as good as the first half.

for those at THR that hate religion (and you know who you are), you will not like it one bit, as the author is quite preachy in spots.

Tamren
January 23, 2008, 04:00 PM
I've enjoyed all of the books I've read written by Richard Marcinko. I've picked up a few pointers for situations I'll almost certainly never be in, and his sense of humor is right in line with my own. Which may or may not say anything good about my psyche.... :p

Apple a Day
January 23, 2008, 05:56 PM
If you like to read online there's Lights Out by Halffast.
I did a zombie story here called Hurricane Flu. I could email you a copy or you could do a search and read it on THR.
Cheers,
Apple

huff.jeremy
January 23, 2008, 07:22 PM
I would recommend my favorite... "Without Remorse" by Tom Clancy.

It is about a Special Forces vet from Vienam who is horribly wronged by some bad dudes... so he takes care of his business with them, personally.

In the story he is a weapons & tactics expert, and thus it makes for a VERY enjoyable read.

ARK9mm
January 23, 2008, 07:56 PM
I just started Richard (Dick) Marcinko's first one. "Rogue Warrior". Interesting so far. It was highly recommended and is supposedly non-fiction. "Only the names have been changed...." kind of thing.

I'm at chapter three and it's good so far!
CH

Gator
January 23, 2008, 07:58 PM
If any of you are fans of the movie "The Rough Riders", you will LOVE the book "Outlaw" by Warren Keifer. The story lines are very similar. I don't know but I'd bet John Milius read "Outlaw" before making the movie.

txgho1911
January 23, 2008, 10:37 PM
Found several online novels. Started looking while I waited for Nightcrawler to continue with the 2nd story that Larry joined in creating.
Some stories I have found are written with tons of action and terms originating from the role games they are based on. You might try to organize a page by number of replies to find the big stories. Then check the last pages to be sure there is an ending.
Larry, Are you seriously needing to plug your book again? hehehe

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=123&t=483521
http://forums.worldofwar.net/forumdisplay.php?f=33
http://guildwars.incgamers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=398918
http://guildwars.incgamers.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=112
http://boards.theforce.net/fan_fiction/c10051
http://boards.theforce.net/board.asp?brd=10304
http://pff.swrebellion.com/
http://www.galacticsenate.com/showthread.php?t=10298
http://www.galacticsenate.com/showthread.php?t=10298&page=6&highlight=temple
http://www.starcraft.org/fanfiction/shortstories/A+Marine%27s+Story+%28Part+10%29
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=259444&page=5

Bellevance
January 24, 2008, 12:32 PM
...a list of recommendations by Stephanie Sane:

http://www.amazon.com/Spine-Tingling-Suspense/lm/R22PX91QQFLBML/ref=cm_lmt_dtpa_f_1_rdssss0?pf_rd_p=253462201&pf_rd_s=listmania-center&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0609606883&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0XE3SP15PN8TPTBC0YCV

PavePusher
January 24, 2008, 01:56 PM
Anything by W.E.B. Griffin.

Disclaimer: I haven't re-read his books since I got serious about firearms, thus I now hie meself to the bookcases to review... :)

ilbob
January 24, 2008, 02:13 PM
Anything by W.E.B. Griffin.
Brotherhood of War series - excellent reading. I have read them all several times. The Corps series. Also excellent reading, and I have read them all several times. These two series just immerse you into the world he weaves with his words. Its almost like you are there watching it unfold sometimes.

He also did several different OSS series. Not anywhere near as good. I have read them all, just once.

He did a police series, too. Have not read any of them.

His Presidential Agent series is readable, but neither the characters nor the stories are anywhere near as good as BOW or Corps, or even his OSS books. The main character is almost a comic book type hero with near magical abilities.

I have to either believe in the story, or the story has to be good enough to make me want to suspend disbelief for me to consider a book of this type really good.

cobrian45
January 26, 2008, 11:11 AM
I second the "Without Remorse" recommendation. I've always thought that would make an excellent movie. Especially with a good, hard heartless rock soundtrack. It's what everyone would want to be able to do if you messed with their family.

ilbob
January 26, 2008, 02:11 PM
Without Remorse
It is a fantastic read. Clancy has this wonderful way of creating believable characters that you care about, and a story that fits the characters.

DougDubya
January 26, 2008, 02:28 PM
I generally attempt to put as much reality with firearms as I can into a story, but considering I'm writing about characters who've appeared in nearly 500 novels and have faced at least 100,000 opponents in firearms encounters, being a stickler for reality kind of gets pushed to the wayside. Plus, my editor won't let me change out the hero's "main choice" of a Desert Eagle .44 Magnum for something more reliable and realistic, like a Smith and Wesson, Ruger or Taurus .44 Magnum revolver.

www.mackbolan.com

gggman
January 26, 2008, 02:30 PM
I like Brad Thor, as the gun related info is well researched. Yes, there is some farfetched action.
Avoid James Patterson, as the man is painfully ignorant about guns. In one of his Alex Cross novels, the character (Cross) clicks off the safety and cocks the hammer on his Glock revolver.:rolleyes:

jackmead
January 26, 2008, 02:32 PM
An oldie but a goodie- Twelve O'Clock High!
Without Remorse was good too

ilbob
January 26, 2008, 03:08 PM
I generally attempt to put as much reality with firearms as I can into a story, but considering I'm writing about characters who've appeared in nearly 500 novels and have faced at least 100,000 opponents in firearms encounters, being a stickler for reality kind of gets pushed to the wayside. Plus, my editor won't let me change out the hero's "main choice" of a Desert Eagle .44 Magnum for something more reliable and realistic, like a Smith and Wesson, Ruger or Taurus .44 Magnum revolver.
I can remember reading Mack Bolan books 25 or 30 years ago.haven't read any in quite a while. Did you do all of them, or do you have help? 500 novels is an incredible output for one author.

I liked his souped up RV with the rocket launcher.

ilbob
January 26, 2008, 03:16 PM
I like Brad Thor, as the gun related info is well researched. Yes, there is some farfetched action. Its hard for me to believe in a book that takes itself seriously while having a character who is a world class, skier, world class mountain climber, world class shooter, world class everything else to boot. I liked the books for the most part, but some times there were scenes that just made me cringe. Might as well have been a book about superman, except the book's main character is immune to kryptonite.
Avoid James Patterson, as the man is painfully ignorant about guns. In one of his Alex Cross novels, the character (Cross) clicks off the safety and cocks the hammer on his Glock revolver.I read one. Don't recall which one. Never went back for more.

45crittergitter
January 26, 2008, 05:16 PM
I agree pretty much anything by Stephen Hunter. My favorite is Point of Impact. I don't think anyone has mentioned Enemies Foreign and Domestic, and Domestic Enemies, by Matthew Bracken.

DougDubya
January 26, 2008, 05:31 PM
I can remember reading Mack Bolan books 25 or 30 years ago.haven't read any in quite a while. Did you do all of them, or do you have help? 500 novels is an incredible output for one author.

I liked his souped up RV with the rocket launcher.

I only started writing in 1999, and I've got 16 books on the shelf so far. There are a lot of fine writers working on the series, though. If you look on the copyright page, if you find the name Jon Guenther, Chuck Rogers, Nathan Meyer or Michael Linnaker, you'll have a fine, fine read.

Mike is also a good western author as well, writing under the pseudonyms Neil Hunter, Richard Wyler, and Daniel Rockfern.

Mike Newton's written over 200 of the books, as well as countless other novels, and he's got excellent firearms research.

Dan Schmidt is hit or miss. When he's good, he's one of the finest writers alive. When he's phoning it in, though, it can be disappointing.

Nick Polotta writes entertaining books, but his gun knowledge tends to incorporate too much vaporware.

As for the RV with the rocket launcher, it's been replaced, occasionally, with a high tech helicopter named Dragonslayer. We tend to avoid using it too much, because it can be deus ex machina (a .50 caliber GECAL machine gun can solve WAY too many problems too quickly for a good book).

DougDubya
January 26, 2008, 05:32 PM
I seriously have to recommend the Stephen Hunter Bob Lee Swagger books. Point of Impact was one of the most fun and exciting reads I'd ever experienced. Havana, about Bob Lee's father, has all forms of old school firearms goodness with BAR's, 1911's and such.

Geronimo45
January 26, 2008, 05:52 PM
Frederic Forsyth (Day of the Jackal, Dogs of War, Odessa File, others) is very accurate in firearms usage. Old guns are full of grease, and require lots of work to clean out. New rifles must be sighted in. Supressors exist to mask the location of the shot. Crew-served weapons are better than individual-served weapons... etc. Dogs of War is especially gun-related. A good bit of the book involves getting the weapons and ammunition purchased and shipped out of Europe.

sm
January 26, 2008, 09:10 PM
Great Replies.

Some other ideas for a variety if I maY:


The Old Man and The Boy - Robert Ruark
(everything by Ruark)

Plum Island
Up Country
The Lion's Game
The Charm School- Nelson DeMille
(everything by De-Mille

Anything by Louis LaMour.

Montana Sky - Nora Roberts
(don't laugh, one heck of a mystery!)

sm
January 26, 2008, 09:12 PM
Great Replies.

Some other ideas for a variety if I maY:


The Old Man and The Boy - Robert Ruark
(everything by Ruark)

Plum Island
Up Country
The Lion's Game
The Charm School- Nelson DeMille
(everything by De-Mille

http://www.nelsondemille.net/books/books.asp

Anything by Louis LaMour.

Montana Sky - Nora Roberts
(don't laugh, one heck of a mystery!)

Not really "gun" still of the best all time reads:

The Pillars of the Earth. - Ken Follett

Avenger
January 26, 2008, 09:30 PM
The "Island" series by S.M. Stirling. A neat sci-fi/fantasy/alternate history series. Basically, the island of Nantucket is transported back in time to about 1500B.C., plopping a high-tech society with little food and resources into a primitive world. It's a good read, but the continuation series is even better.

Baba Louie
January 26, 2008, 10:06 PM
Any and all of Bernard Cornwell's "Sharpe's Rifle" series. Actually, any of Cornwell's books are excellent reads. That's a couple dozen good books easily.

Radagast
January 27, 2008, 01:52 AM
Eric Flints Ring of fire series is good, they actually get better as you go along. Start with 1632.
Basic premise: The town of Grantville West Virginia gets dumped back in time and space into Thuringia germany during the 30 years war, the good old boys from the local coal mine then procede to remake europe to suit their ideals.
The anthologies with stories by other authors are particularly good, 'Curio & Relic' about a retired tunnel rat & C&R collector who ends up taking over the towns reloading work is excellent. It's the only story I've read with a realistic use of the .577 T-Rex in combat.

Flints "1812 The rivers of war" is shaping up to be a great series as well. Another what if, what if the Cherokee, instead of embarking on the trail of tears, had seen the writing on the wall and bugged out early, setting up their own republic on the other side of the mississippi and started making cannon?

John Ringos Ghost series. Basic premise: Mike Harmon, 'ghost' washed out SEAL & university student likes to stalk girls. While doig so he witnesses a kidnapping, jumps on the back of the perps vehicles, ends up in a major gun fight with the bad guys, but the girl gets moved, ended up in the wheelwell of a 727, ends up in the best gunfight I've ever read..... bugger it, I can't give you any spoilers, just buy the book. If you like it you'll buy the rest. It costs me $55.00 to buy them in hardback here in Australia and it's worth it not to wait for the paperback. *warning* There are some heavy sex scenes, including rape, bondage & S&M. Thankfully these are fairly self contained and I simply skip those chapters.

Ringos stand alone books, Through the Looking Glass & Princess of Wands are very accurate about their gun handling. TTLG is an aliens invade through a stargate that appears on earth. They get thrown back at great cost by a scratch militia. Then more gates start opening..... POW is about a hot christian MILF soccer mom (sorry but that's pretty much the way she is described) who believes in the jesus, no cussing, the sanctity of marriage,only saying nice things about people, that her husband is the head of the house hold and what he says goes. She also has a blackbelt and a H&K USP. Then real demons appear....

SM Stirlings Island series is good. His Dies The Fire series is even better.
In The Island In The Sea of Time, Nantucket is enveloped by a strange force field that sends it back in time, swapping positions in time with the Nantucket of 3000 BC. A coast guard square rigger, the Eagle is in port and provides a basis for exploration and trade with Mycean Greece. Unfortunately one of the coast guard officers is a psychpath with delusions of being the next Stalin and the technological base to carry it off......

In Dies The Fire, at the same time as Nantucket disappears, in our world the lights go out. Permanently. Electricity, gun powder, explosives and internal combustion engines cease to work. The great dieing begins as cities starve, with no way to move food or people other than on foot. In the bitterroot ranges a light plane crashes and the former ranger piloting it does what he can to save his passengers, gradually linking up with other survivors to form a band and restart civilisation again. Swords, cavalry, bows and arrows, norman castles and the roman phalanx return as the weapons of choice. Four books in the series and more to come, there are hints in book four that book five will hook up the two series.

Also by Stirling is Conquistador. If you've read anything by H Beam Piper, such as Gunpowder God, you will like this. It's the best alternate universe/cross time story I've read. It's a stand alone book, although I wish it was a series. The war is over. A former force recon marine is now a department of fish and game investigator on the trail of smugglers of protected species. In a raid on a warehouse he finds a live dodo...... It get's better from there. Blackhawk helicopters beside WWII mosquito fighter bombers. trecking across the west in a land where there really are wild indians. Real live Nazis. Incas who wear greatful dead T shirts while cutting out hearts... I've reread it several times.

akodo
January 27, 2008, 04:43 PM
Lee Child does pretty good in the Jack Reacher novels. Even if there wasn't a gun in any of them they are excellent reads. Try Dean Ing's stuff also.

I am going to strongly disagree here. Jack Reacher is some Chuck Norris type superbeing. When he was recovering from being wounded in Beruit, as a Lt, he was allowed to decide if the US military should go for the Glock 17 or the Beretta 92, he chose the Beretta because it's longer barrel made it much more powerful ???? He runs around with a Desert Eagle jammed in the waste of his pants, or in his jacket pocket??? The Ithica 10 gauge pumpgun is the criminal weapon of choice, because it is a deathray slaying anyone in the forward arc of the shooter for at least 100 yards, so because Reacher's love interest is always in that arc of death, you got to sneak up on em from behind rather than engage them with your desert eagle at long range.

He can walk up to a Barret .50 BMG and shoot a smiley face in a tree 1000 yards past the 1000 yard paper target he is supposedly unable to hit. He works with the government to bring down a militia, then has no qualms about helping the government hide it all from John Q Taxpayer.

whuffines
January 27, 2008, 08:08 PM
I second Michael Z. Williamson's "The Weapon" but also STRONGLY recommend his book "Freehold". Freehold is the best description of what a society would look like with a true Libertarian government. It also depicts the end result of encroaching government control on rights for another society.

Also " A State of Disobedience" by Tom Kratman. His bio is indicative of the quality of his books:

Kratman is a political refugee and defector from the People's Republic of Massachusetts. The mechanism of his defection was enlisting into the Army in 1974 at age 17, which deeply distressed his high school (Boston Latin, founded 1635) as they thought he had "higher and better things" ahead of him. He served two years as an enlisted grunt with the 101st Airborne and one and a half with the 193rd Infantry Brigade in Panama, getting 2 years of college done in the process (when he wasn't in the field he was taking courses). At that point the Army gave Kratman a scholarship and sent him off to Boston College to finish his degree and obtain a commission.

Tom graduated, cum laude, in 1980 and returned to the Army as an infantry officer. Tom served another three year tour in Panama, then more schooling at Benning, then 4+ years with the 24th Infantry Division near Savannah, Georgia. Fun times then ceased for a while while he did two years in Recruiting Command.

Saddam Hussein (PBUH) saved Tom from this by invading Kuwait. He has been told that he was the only captain to actually escape from USAREC for the war. Tom arranged a transfer to Special Operations Command and went through the active part of the campaign attached to¬ 5th Special Forces. He continued slurping at the Army trough until it became painfully clear that the bottom had dropped out of the militantly and violently aggressive anti-communism market and that he was not going to like the rather PC direction the Army (which was, arguably, the only thing he ever selflessly loved) was heading in.

Among other things, Tom earned a Combat Infantry Badge and the Ranger Tab.

Tom got out in 92 and went to law school. He hated it but was far too pig headed to quit. He became a lawyer in 95 and quickly realized that what he had felt about law school was but a pale shadow of true hate. Stayed in the Reserves and took every tour he could to avoid practicing law. And when the reserves had nothing interesting there was MPRI ("white collar mercenaries R us").

Saddam Hussein (PBUH) once again stepped to the fore and saved Tom from the continued practice of law. In February of 2003 the Army called him up to participate in the invasion of Iraq. Still, God has a sense of humor. While awaiting a flight over Tom was informed he had a 100% blockage in his right coronary artery (imagine his chagrin) and wasn't going anywhere fun anytime soon. Instead, he spent eight months stuck at Fort Bragg, then a few in the DC area, before finally being sent on to be on the faculty of the Army War College as Director, Rule of Law, for the US Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute. Keep in mind that divine sense of humor previously mentioned.

qwert65
January 27, 2008, 08:16 PM
Check out Rainbow six and teeth of the tiger by tom clancy also Word of Honor be DeMille

Millwright
January 27, 2008, 08:32 PM
Lots of Heinlein, A.E. Van Vought - The Weapons Shops - series, H. Beam Piper, Jerry Pournelle, David Drake and a slew of others.......All stress/pivot plots on personal ownership of arms... >MW

CypherNinja
January 27, 2008, 09:47 PM
The "STEN" series. Not entirely gun related, but good stuff for a gunny.

They're about a soldier (Sten) in ~4000AD. Sci-fi, but not 'hard sci-fi'.

I'm reading them on LawDog's recommendation, good stuff.

First of eight: http://www.amazon.com/Sten-Chris-Bunch/dp/1841490075/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201484786&sr=8-1

yhtomit
January 27, 2008, 09:53 PM
I think that Gordon Liddy's novels all have *some* gunplay, and I remember his portrayals as being quite accurate -- typical Liddy :)

timothy

serrano
January 28, 2008, 12:30 AM
How about Kingdom of Fear by Hunter S. Thompson?

Ho ho ho.

Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six might be up your alley.

If you enjoyed reading about "Novel Recommendations" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!