Practicality of a Lanyard


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CWL
January 23, 2008, 07:42 PM
Y'all,

Does anyone regularly use a lanyard for his sidearm? Except for Brittish Leftennants about to receive a Zulu charge, are there any practical needs for them anymore?

Given the fact that I own several pistols with lanyard holes, I finally made the effort and bought one.

Attached to pistol and my belt, it did not affect my draw in any way, nor did it affect my ability to change magazines. I did however, feel stupid to have one more thing attached to me.

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rero360
January 23, 2008, 08:08 PM
we were required to use them when I was over in Iraq, but given the types of individuals we had in the company (only a select few, but lord were they incompitent) it was probably a good idea. I had my pistol in a chest rig, tactical talior, and I found it would catch on stuff every now and then but I never cared if it broke, kind of hoped it would so i wouldn't have to use it any more.

Glockman17366
January 23, 2008, 08:13 PM
In the true chaos of a gunfight, when your body takes over and your thinking may not be as clear as it should be; you might appreciate having your pistol on a lanyard.

Blacksmoke
January 23, 2008, 08:20 PM
Oh, I don't know, a braided lanyard in gold attached to the but of a Royal Blue Colt Python with a 6 inch barrel and carried in a flap holster would make quite an impression. You would cut a handsome figure strolling through the mall;).

It is not a bad idea for a nightwatchman or a security guard in a public place (a simple lanyard, not something out of "The Student Prince"). These people are less likely to be involved in a hand-to-hand scuffle with a perp who could grab the lanyard or a necktie and use it to his advantage. I could see a Harbor Master or Harbor Patrolman using a lanyard. If he dropped his weapon, it might never be seen again.

The Lone Haranguer
January 23, 2008, 08:23 PM
It is better to have a lanyard attachment and not need it, than need it and not have it. I am not sure what need I have, but I think a lanyard would be a benefit to a mounted or motorcycle police officer.

takhtakaal
January 23, 2008, 08:26 PM
Sometimes we find ourselves rolling around trying to stay in a fight that hasn't gotten to guns yet, or we find ourselves suddenly in a strange position that may or may not have us halfway upside down. The advantage of a lanyard is that the pistol is never further away than its length.

TimM
January 23, 2008, 08:27 PM
Ok, I am gonna ask another dumb question. What is the proper way to use a lanyard? Does anyone have photos?

GlockamaniaŽ
January 23, 2008, 08:33 PM
For military, a necessity for combat factors.

For a civie, a cool factor.

Vern Humphrey
January 23, 2008, 08:35 PM
Ok, I am gonna ask another dumb question. What is the proper way to use a lanyard? Does anyone have photos?
The lanyard loop goes over the head, so the cord passes over the left shoulder and under the right arm. To put it around your neck invites someone to strangle you.

Lanyards were essential on horseback, and pretty critical for parachute operations.

junyo
January 23, 2008, 08:35 PM
Mossy rock, rotten log, a quick slip, head over tea kettle down a slope, strewing personal effects down a hill, face to face with a pissed off critter at the bottom. Canoe tipped over, supplies headed for the bottom, three day walk back to civilization.

Lanyard would be real handy two seconds after either. I never thought of a lanyard for modern combat, but consider it essential for the woods.

TimM
January 23, 2008, 08:57 PM
The lanyard loop goes over the head, so the cord passes over the left shoulder and under the right arm. To put it around your neck invites someone to strangle you.
Stupid question #2. How would this work with a concealed weapon or would it?

Bones11b
January 23, 2008, 09:16 PM
I used to think lanyards were silly. Then I went days on end with little or no rest and realized were it not for lanyards I would have lost most of the equipment that I depended on. Not to mention going head over heels down a mud slide in the jungle. Capsizing a zodiac in the ocean. Sliding on my butt down an ice covered slope. Wrestling a person into submission. As for how best to utilize a lanyard I tie mine just long enough so my gear doesn't hit the ground.

average_shooter
January 23, 2008, 09:23 PM
Most of the modern lanyards I've seen don't go over the head or anything, they just attach to the belt. For CCW it might work, if you feel it is necessary. Some lanyards are not much more than a length of paracord, others have "bungie"-like material in them so they act like a telephone cord, they coil up when at rest but allow for full extension when needed.

DoubleTapDrew
January 23, 2008, 10:13 PM
How would this work with a concealed weapon or would it?

You loop one end through the lanyard hole and the other end to your wallet. It adds to the "OMG!" factor if you lose your sidearm :neener:

peyton
January 24, 2008, 01:25 AM
As the Platoon Sergeant, I had the "Pleasure" of training new Lieutenants. One of the first things taught is when the pistol is checked out of the arms room, the lanyard is attached to the pistol and then to them. Rifles are easier to find if "Left Behind" or forgotten during a field exercise, Pistols are almost impossible to retrieve. Not wanting to have an embarrassed new leader, I explained that weapon and personnel accountability was the Platoon Leaders number one job. NOT said is everyone would try to take the pistol if unattended in order to make the new LT look like a dummy. In the sandbox here, I see a wide variety of pistol retention straps.

1911Tuner
January 24, 2008, 05:59 AM
All my carry pistols have lanyard loops, even though I rarely have need for a lanyard these days...since I gave up trampin' through the bush and 4-wheelin' and such. They're all still there. They don't weigh much, and they don't eat, so why not. I used a lanyard on a 4-wheeler even with the gun in a flapped holster. Overkill...but there it is.

My method was to use a length of parachute cord, long enough to bring the pistol to eye level in both hands, and just tuck the excess length into my pants, right behind or under the holster...between holster and belt.

Another good method is to carry a Commander in a military flapped holster with the lanyard coiled up and tucked into the bottom to take up the space left by the shorter slide.

Joe Demko
January 24, 2008, 08:22 AM
I like lanyards. The first one I ever used was the surplus leather one that came with my Makarov. I liked it so much I started using "field expedient" lanyards on my other pieces that have loops.
My wife is from Ukraine and grew up there during the Soviet-era. According to her lanyards are for "when moscali is drunk and drop pistolet, he not lose."

wheelgunslinger
January 24, 2008, 08:29 AM
I use one for hiking and backpacking. It's only a foot or two of paracord.

I don't do any tactical responses to anything, so I suppose that's all I need it for.

Though, this thread does have me thinking about a wrist lanyard for a nightstand weapon.

novaDAK
January 24, 2008, 08:35 AM
If I were on a ship, a harbor, on a bridge, rock climbing, on a moving train, shooting from a car, shooting on a roof, etc., I would want a lanyard.

I highly doubt I'd ever be doing any of the above, but I wouldn't mind if my gun had an attachment point on it just to be prepared :)

Onmilo
January 24, 2008, 08:41 AM
I use my lanyards when my buddy and I get in a canoe or flatbottom boat and go floating around his lake and the ajacent part of a certain river where asian flying carp are particularly abundent.
I won't admit what we do with the pistols but the lanyards are a great added safety feature that keeps the guns from going into the drink.
P.S. I like CCI shotshells. :)
http://www.fototime.com/A6FABDFBF6A0803/standard.jpg
http://www.fototime.com/798591FB058CC41/standard.jpg

AK103K
January 24, 2008, 08:51 AM
My method was to use a length of parachute cord, long enough to bring the pistol to eye level in both hands, and just tuck the excess length into my pants, right behind or under the holster...between holster and belt.
This is pretty much the way I do it too.

Pretty much any pistol I carry has a lanyard loop of some sort, or I rig one if possible

Anyone who canoes or kayaks, and especially on a river, knows their value. It will amaze you what the river will remove from your "secure" pockets.


Onmilo,

Those British 58 web holsters are one of the best all around field holsters going. They are cheap, very well made, easily adapted to many different uses, and provide great protection. They work well with a number of different pistols too, and not just the HP.

El Tejon
January 24, 2008, 08:52 AM
With a pistol, depends on what I'm doing. Unlike most THR members, I do not regularly jump out of helicopters and dispatch tangos with swift Judo chops, thus I do not use them.

I think for canoeing or backpacking (or jumping out of helicopters or tooling around on SF tinkertoy cars), the use of a lanyard makes a lot of sense to me.

I prefer to use a lanyard on a flashlight.

Bwana John
January 24, 2008, 09:55 AM
While I have a lanyard loop on my 1911, it does get in the way of putting a mag in, if the mag doesent have a bumper on the bottom.

With the bumper no problem, but without a bumper it kinda hurts the heal of the hand while seating the mag.

1911Tuner
January 24, 2008, 10:17 AM
With the bumper no problem, but without a bumper it kinda hurts the heal of the hand while seating the mag.

Don't place the heel of your hand so far to the rear. Once ya practice it a little, you can slam one in and never touch the loop.

ceetee
January 24, 2008, 10:18 AM
Unlike most THR members, I do not regularly jump out of helicopters and dispatch tangos with swift Judo chops, thus I do not use them.

Dang... we gotta get El T up to speed!:neener:

That said, the only time I've ever been armed and felt in danger of losing my CCW was on a lengthy (five-day) canoe trip. I though of rigging up something, but instead, just wound up stuffing it into a large (not made for CCW) fanny pack, and calling it good. Maybe the gods smiled upon me that trip, but it WAS good!

sixgunner455
January 24, 2008, 10:30 AM
I can see the sense in it, but I have no pistols that have attachment points for one.

230RN
January 24, 2008, 12:06 PM
Never used one, but I seem to recall reading somewhere that by tensioning it right, it can reduce wobble when brought to eye level for deliberate shots.

Anyone?

Futuristic
January 24, 2008, 12:19 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned this yet, other than the strangling comment. Most modern lanyards include a seriously necessary component: A BREAKAWAY.

This is just like the breakaway on neck lanyards like you hang your ID or a whistle on. It keeps you from being pulled along with your gun if it gets grabbed in a piece of machinery. Or, if someone strong tries to drag you by your gun.

Most of these Breakaways are tuned to not let go until they are under 85-100 pounds of tension, so they won't let go just because someone is struggling with you for your gun. Once they try to drag you off your feet by it...PING...the lanyard gives way. Same thing if your pistol gets caught in a vehicle that takes off and leaves you behind...

Safety, folks!

Futuristic

BTW, I am fond of lanyards for open carry, but I insist on a Breakaway.

ClarkEMyers
January 24, 2008, 01:11 PM
I like the idea perhaps more than the execution but I do have them. Guns and knives both. I agree that a breakaway is wise idea just as it is on a dog's collar or anything that might be hung up - be it on machinery or a fence; fishing line of appropriate test can be used to rig a breakaway on harness gear notice the actual breakaway will depend on knots and doubling the line and such so won't be even close to the rated strength most of the time whether more or less depends.

Similarly many fighting grips on a knife will loop a lanyard so it can be slipped from the thumb given that any tie might be used against the wearer - I hear a voice in the back of my head saying you can't pull it loose so give it back to him (hard and fast).

I like the Mars/Guncrafter style recessed lanyard loop better than the GI - S&A lanyard loop for the 1911 but then again these days it's poptops and twistoffs so bottle openers are obsolete.

Anybody make a case for lanyard loops on magazines?

CWL
January 25, 2008, 05:38 PM
Anybody make a case for lanyard loops on magazines?

I see the point for lanyards on a sidearm.

It would be a nightmare for magazines. Since mags are normally carried on the weak side and passed over, these'll cross-up on first use. When you do a mag reload, they'll twist-up.

Ever tried a tactical reload? Two mags in the same hand at the same time.
It'll never work. I'd rather have to buy new mags rather be killed because my gear is all tangled.

Vern Humphrey
January 25, 2008, 05:51 PM
I see the point for lanyards on a sidearm.

It would be a nightmare for magazines. Since mags are normally carried on the weak side and passed over, these'll cross-up on first use. When you do a mag reload, they'll twist-up.
The original M1911 magazines had a loop on the floorplate. The lanyard was Y-shaped, with one branch running to the lanyard loop on the pistol, the other to the magazine inserted in the magazine well.

The idea seemed to be that after a pistol attack, the trooper would still have at least one magazine in his possession. Good in theory, but in practice it was quickly abandoned.

rcmodel
January 25, 2008, 05:57 PM
Least you didn't have to get down off your horse if you dropped your mag.

The 1911 lanyards kind of went away with the horse cavalry it seems.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j219/rcmodel/KTOG/1224.gif
rcmodel

RoadkingLarry
January 25, 2008, 07:23 PM
They came in real handy for Topside Watches on Submarines. The 1911s had a lanyard, the 870s didn't guess which one went in the drink. La Madallena was so clear you could just make it out in about 50' water if the sun was right before they sent the diver after it.

Erik
January 25, 2008, 08:05 PM
As noted, they may be/are handy in the field, around water, and at heights. If that applies to you may want to consider one.

kir_kenix
January 25, 2008, 09:41 PM
i think that all "combat" handguns need to have a lanyard. its not like they take up any space/weight, so they might as well be present. i personally like the "hollowed out" flush type w/ a crosspin in the recess.

kd7nqb
January 26, 2008, 12:19 AM
Well it sounds like we have finally found something that the brilliant M&P is missing. However glocks are missing them too.

I think it would be a cool option for ATV riding and such.

Geronimo45
January 26, 2008, 01:14 AM
They're useful for me. One of the very nice things about my 1911.

You see, there is one way to split logs. Force. A big guy can put a lot of force into a swing without much motion. A smaller guy has to do more to get the same effect. I have had my 1911 jump out of the holster. Repeatedly. Yes, it's a GI-ish shoulder rig, not a retention rig... but I was moving enough to throw a full-sized Government Model clear out of the holster. The lanyard kept it from falling in the mud. Probably not too useful for most people... but it couldn't hurt to have it if you work or play close to the drink. If the gun leaves the holster, it won't leave you... of course, most folks here probably won't be moving enough to have that happen. Yes, it can be useful.

daniel (australia)
January 26, 2008, 07:35 AM
However glocks are missing them too.
No they aren't. The little hole in the rear of the butt, down near the bottom, is for the lanyard to clip into. They even make the lanyard:

http://www.glockfaq.com/images/pics/lanyard_attached.jpg

FWIW I like lanyards for many of the reasons set out above: if you are doing active stuff, perhaps on a vehicle, under stress or with distractions of various sorts they stop you losing the sidearm. It is easy enough to do, and embarrassing if not much worse to find the holster empty when you need it. FWIW I prefer to have it looped around the strong side shoulder, but you need an epaulette or something to hold it in place. Otherwise it loops around the head and strong-side arm. Tied to the belt it tends to snag on stuff.

Erik
January 26, 2008, 03:13 PM
Arguably the benchmark lanyard currently in use:

http://www.gem-tech.com/trl.html

ClarkEMyers
January 26, 2008, 08:07 PM
Jeff Cooper suggested a short wrist attachment for sleeping rough with a 1911. Myself I'd likely do that with an empty chamber.

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